Category: kmbmchox

Kwarteng: Social distancing in retail and hospitality could stay the year

first_imgA government review on social distancing will be published in June, but many establishments – particularly in the hospitality sector – are pushing for restrictions on social distancing to be eased as soon as possible.   Business minister Kwasi Kwarteng thinks social distancing in retail and hospitality could remain throughout 2021. (Getty Images) Also Read: Kwasi Kwarteng: Social distancing in retail and hospitality could stay the year Hannah Godfrey “I think there will be some degree of residential. In Staines high street, for example, in 2010 I can’t think of any flats whereas now I see lots of places being turned into flats which were originally retail outlets. “I think this year, there may well be still some social distancing. There’s also that whole thing of consumer behaviour. People will expect a certain degree of safeguards. We don’t know how people are going to react.” Last month Boris Johnson announced almost all Covid-19 restrictions could be lifted by June 21, so long as the battle against the coronavirus continues to go to plan. “You’ll see a bit more residential coming back. They [people] will be living on the high street.” Business minister Kwasi Kwarteng thinks social distancing in retail and hospitality could remain throughout 2021. (Getty Images) Also Read: Kwasi Kwarteng: Social distancing in retail and hospitality could stay the year Kwasi Kwarteng: Social distancing in retail and hospitality could stay the year In an interview with The Times he said: “When I speak to retailers and people in the hospitality industry they are quite ready to adapt their premises to social distancing. What they can’t stand is the idea of opening up and then plunging back into a lockdown. That’s what they really want to avoid. More From Our Partners A ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.org “One of the things I’m very keen that we get our heads around is the whole future of the high street,” he told The Times. Despite the planned ease in June, with even nightclubs set to be allowed to open, Kwarteng believes some social distancing could be here for the duration of the year. Show Comments ▼ Business minister Kwasi Kwarteng thinks social distancing in retail and hospitality could remain throughout 2021. (Getty Images) whatsapp Tags: Coronavirus whatsapp Business minister Kwasi Kwarteng believes social distancing in the retail and hospitality sectors could remain in some capacity for the rest of the year. Saturday 6 March 2021 9:22 am Elsewhere, the business minister said some degree of flexible working was likely to remain in the long-term, and that the future of the high street looks residential. Share last_img read more

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E. coli outbreak linked to Chipotle expands to 9 states

first_imgHealthE. coli outbreak linked to Chipotle expands to 9 states Associated Press About the Author Reprints An outbreak of E. coli linked to Chipotle has expanded to nine states. Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images Tags bacteriaCDCE. coli Earlier Friday, Chipotle said it was tightening its food safety standards.The Denver-based chain known for touting the quality of its ingredients said it hired IEH Laboratories in Seattle to help improve its procedures. It said it will implement testing of all produce before it is shipped to restaurants and enhance employee training for food safety and handling.Chipotle has not yet said how sales have been affected by the bad publicity from the outbreak, but plans to provide a financial update before a presentation for analysts and investors Tuesday. In October, the company had forecast sales at established locations would be up in the low- to mid-single digit percentages for 2015.The company’s shares fell 2.5 percent to $551.16 in trading Friday afternoon.Chipotle said it tested ingredients before, but that it is moving to testing smaller batches and a larger number of samples.“In testing for pathogens, in many ways you’re looking for needles in haystacks. Through this high resolution testing program, we are making the haystacks smaller by working with smaller lots,” the company said.It said that no ingredients that are likely to have been connected to the incident remain in its restaurants or supply system.Chris Arnold, a spokesman for Chipotle Mexican Grill Inc., said the company’s local produce suppliers may not all be able to meet the new standards. The company noted that its local produce program accounts for a “relatively small percentage” of the produce it uses, and only runs from around June through October in most parts of the country. By Associated Press Dec. 4, 2015 Reprints The CDC had said in late November that additional cases could be reported for illnesses that started after Oct. 31.Of the 52 people infected, the CDC says 47 reported eating at a Chipotle restaurant the week before the illness started. The agency has not yet determined the ingredient that made people sick.advertisement NEW YORK — An outbreak of E. coli linked to Chipotle has expanded to nine states, with a total of 52 people being sickened.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday there were seven additional illnesses, including in three more states — Illinois, Maryland and Pennsylvania. The most recent illness started on Nov. 13, it said.The majority of the illnesses have been in Oregon and Washington, where cases were initially reported at the end of October. Additional cases were later reported in California, Minnesota, New York and Ohio.advertisementlast_img read more

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Inspector Highlights Importance of Relationship Between Police and Citizens

first_imgRelatedInspector Highlights Importance of Relationship Between Police and Citizens RelatedInspector Highlights Importance of Relationship Between Police and Citizens RelatedInspector Highlights Importance of Relationship Between Police and Citizens FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The importance of a good relationship between the Police and citizens to reduce crime was emphasised at a Neighbourhood Watch meeting held in Bonny Gate, St. Mary on July 25.Giving the main address, Inspector Michael Garrick of the Port Maria Police, said members of the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) was fully committed to working with the citizens of the country to keep the various communities peaceful and safe.The meeting was convened to promote closer police/public co-operation in that community and to encourage the residents to be aggressive in their effort to keep criminal activities out of their area.Inspector Garrick said the Bonny Gate community was one of the calmest districts in St. Mary in relation to criminal activities, adding that it was excellent example for other communities to emulate.He noted that the Police has not received a report of any major crime occurring in Bonny Gate since the start of this year, and that this was commendable achievement which should be encouraged.Inspector Garrick reported that since the beginning of this year, there have been 18 murders, 19 cases of rape, 15 cases of robbery and 47 cases of break-ins throughout the parish.Congratulating the Bonny Gate Neighbourhood Watch for the commendable role it was playing to keep the community safe, he praised the young people of Bonny Gate for the recent step they took to form a Police Youth Club in the community, adding that such an initiative would only redound to overall improvement of security in the community.He encouraged the residents to always devise ways and methods to enhance their efforts at keeping criminal activities out of their community, and to make every effort to ensure that conflicts are resolved peacefully.center_img Inspector Highlights Importance of Relationship Between Police and Citizens UncategorizedJuly 30, 2007 Advertisementslast_img read more

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Transport Canada introduces additional requirements to allow for return to service of Boeing 737 MAX

first_imgTransport Canada introduces additional requirements to allow for return to service of Boeing 737 MAX From: Transport CanadaThe Government of Canada remains committed to keeping Canadians, the travelling public, and the transportation system safe and secure.The Government of Canada remains committed to keeping Canadians, the travelling public, and the transportation system safe and secure.Today, Transport Canada issued an Airworthiness Directive for the Boeing 737 MAX which outlines the required modifications to be made to the aircraft prior to a return to service in Canadian airspace. This concludes the department’s review of the aircraft.As part of Transport Canada’s independent review process, the department’s civil aviation certification and flight safety experts were instrumental in guiding the aircraft design changes. Additionally, the department has gone even farther by introducing unique Canadian measures to further enhance the safety of the aircraft.In addition to all reviews, and to provide additional assurances that all measures are in place, an Interim Order that clearly indicates Transport Canada’s expectations and requirements for additional training for crew members was also issued for operators. It is complementary to the design and maintenance requirements of the Airworthiness Directive.As a final step in this process, Transport Canada will lift the existing Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) which prohibits the commercial operation of the aircraft in Canadian airspace on January 20, 2021. This will allow for the return to service of the aircraft in Canada.Transport Canada has spent well over 15,000 review hours on the Boeing 737 MAX. This review has seen Canada take a significant leadership role in the overall project helping shape many decisions taken by the state of design authorities, the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). It has also resulted in Transport Canada issuing its own unique Airworthiness Directive as opposed to the adoption of the FAA Airworthiness Directive.Throughout the department’s independent review, it has worked extensively with the FAA and other key certifying authorities, including the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), the National Civil Aviation Agency of Brazil (ANAC), as well as Canadian airline operators, crews and union associations on the implementation of these measures.Through oversight activities, the department has confirmed that Canadian operators are implementing the required measures and will be ready for the return to service of the aircraft in the coming days and weeks. Canadian airline operators have also collaborated in the development of the new training program. In addition, since Transport Canada approved the revised training program for the three Canadian Operators on December 21, 2020, these airlines have been actively training their pilots.Quotes“Over the last 20 months, Transport Canada’s civil aviation safety experts, by their rigour and thoroughness, have ensured the safety concerns the department had identified have been addressed. Canadians and the airline industry can rest assured that Transport Canada has diligently addressed all safety issues prior to permitting this aircraft to return to service in Canadian airspace.”The Honourable Omar AlghabraMinister of Transport /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Aviation, Boeing, Brazil, Canada, civil aviation, Europe, european, European Union, Federal, Government, industry, leadership, Minister, operation, Transport, United Stateslast_img read more

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Boulder, Chicago graduate students launch forum to discuss 2020 election

first_imgTalking Politics: Anthropologists and Linguists Analyze the 2020 ElectionJoin language and politics experts across the United States as they discuss the 2020 election in this online forum. How is the 2020 U.S. Presidential Election affected by language and culture? Experience and learn how anthropologists and linguists decipher political messages, and examine the words, gestures, tone of voice, and unspoken meanings that implicitly affect who we vote for, and why. Talking Politics brings together anthropology and linguistics experts to share their distinctive analytic perspectives on political communication in the 2020 U.S. Presidential Election. Organized by graduate students in the University of Chicago Department of Anthropology and University of Colorado Boulder Program in Culture, Language, and Social Practice (CLASP), this interdisciplinary workshop series invites the public to experience and learn how language and culture shape real-world political communication.This online forum features a series of webinars and a closing colloquium. Each Talking Politics webinar will feature demonstrations of the types of data and methods of analysis that anthropologists and linguists use in studying political communication. Each featured scholar will also engage in a conversation with invited guest discussants and members of the public. The series will conclude in December with a final colloquium featuring all the series’ speakers, moderated by Kira Hall, Professor of Linguistics and Anthropology at University of Colorado Boulder and President of the Society for Linguistic Anthropology (SLA).All events are online, and are free and open to the public. Register here at Eventbrite to receive updates and news on all upcoming workshops, as well as more information on invited speakers.Speaker Events:“How Plausible is the Deniability?” | 9 Oct 2020, 6pm CTAdam Hodges, Adjunct Assistant Professor at the Department of Linguistics at University of Colorado Boulder. He is a sociocultural linguist with research interests in how language impacts contemporary social and political issues, such as the collective enactment of racism or the role language plays in politics.“Political Gesture in Presidential Debate” | 20 Oct 2020, 3pm CTMichael Lempert, Associate Professor of Anthropology at University of Michigan Ann Arbor. A linguistic anthropologist with cross-disciplinary interests, he has trained in several fields and written on a wide range of topics having to do with social interaction, featuring political gesture and embodied communication.“Communicating Crisis: Getting Back to Whose Normal?” | 30 Oct 2020, 5pm CTJonathan Rosa, Associate Professor at the Stanford Graduate School of Education. As a sociocultural and linguistic anthropologist, Jonathan Rosa’s research theorizes the co-naturalization of language and race as a key feature of modern governance.“Race and Gender Panics in the 2020 Trump Campaign” | 16 Nov 2020, 5pm CTJanet McIntosh, Professor of Anthropology at Brandeis University. She is a cultural anthropologist with wide-ranging interests, including linguistic anthropology, narrative and discourse, whiteness studies, nationalism, and East Africa.Norma Mendoza-Denton, Professor of Anthropology at University of California at Los Angeles. Her research focuses on youth, language, migration, politics, and identity.Final Colloquium | 11 Dec 2020, 5pm CTAll invited speakers, moderated by Kira Hall, Professor of Linguistics and Anthropology at University of Colorado Boulder. Kira Hall’s research focuses on language and social identity in India and the United States, particularly with respect to hierarchies of gender, sexuality, and socioeconomic class. Her recent work has turned to diverse topics, including the role of gesture in Donald Trump’s entertainment appeal.Talking Politics is proudly co-sponsored by the Society for Linguistic Anthropology (SLA), the Center for the Study of Communication and Society (CSCS) and Linguistic Anthropology Lab at the University of Chicago, and the Program in Culture, Language, and Social Practice (CLASP) at the University of Colorado BoulderRead the official Press release for Talking Politics here. Organizing CommitteeWee Yang Soh (Lead Organizer, UChicago), Velda Khoo (Lead Organizer, CU Boulder)Joshua Babcock (UChicago), Molly Hamm-Rodríguez (CU Boulder), Jacob Henry (CU Boulder), Maureen Kosse (CU Boulder), Rebecca Lee (CU Boulder), Maria Ruiz-Martinez (CU Boulder), Feng Ye (UChicago)For more information on the Talking Politics online forum, please contact Wee Yang Soh at [email protected], or Velda Khoo at [email protected] Persons with disabilities who require an accommodation in order to fully participate in this event should contact Velda Khoo at [email protected]last_img read more

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Case Study: VinAsset Produces Win-Win for Winery and Supplier

first_imgTwitter Linkedin TAGSvinasset Home Industry News Releases Case Study: VinAsset Produces Win-Win for Winery and SupplierIndustry News ReleasesCase Study: VinAsset Produces Win-Win for Winery and SupplierBy Press Release – March 7, 2014 44 0 AdvertisementSourcing Event Uncovers Significant Savings and New Supplier RelationshipSausalito, CA. March 5, 2014 – With increasing pressures on cost, VinAsset was asked to review a broader base of bottle suppliers that met all agreed upon requirements and to conduct a sourcing event to gauge the marketplace. Our member winery was able to forge a new relationship with a premium supplier and saved 28.7% on its 2014 bottle purchases.ChallengeTime-consuming process to research competitive prices for bottlesDifficult to identify new suppliers that match exact specificationsThe winery uses unique label requirements that impact bottle selectionObjectiveMember winery wanted to reduce costs and improve its purchasing process Source three different bottle typesAcquire a supplier with best-in-class quality and customer serviceSolutionVinAsset worked directly with winery to create an electronic RFQ that describes all necessary requirementsThrough the VinAsset platform, the RFQ was submitted to potential suppliers with one clickThe sourcing team was able to easily identify new suppliers that could produce bottles that matched all specificationsThe team received responses from nine qualified suppliersResultsProfessional electronic sourcing event was conducted by VinAssetTwo week durationTime-saving electronic responsesQuotes organized for easy side-by-side comparisonMember received timely samplesEase-of-use of the VinAsset platform made it quicker and easier for both winery and the supplierMember Winery saved 28.7% on its 2014 bottle buy with a new supplierABOUT VINASSET:VinAsset is a Hybrid Group Purchasing Organization (GPO) in the adult beverage industry created to connect breweries, wineries and distillers to the right suppliers.  We help our members and suppliers manage overall spend by reducing purchasing risk, conserving cash and improving productivity, all within our Vertically Integrated Network. Our cloud-based technology platform enables higher connectivity, visibility, compliance and profitability, simplifying procurement along the way. www.vinasset.comAdvertisement Share Email Pinterest Facebook ReddIt Previous articleAfternoon Brief, Mar. 6Next articleAfternoon Brief, Mar. 7 Press Releaselast_img read more

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Day 2 play washed out at LPGA Thailand

first_imgCHONBURI, Thailand – Unseasonal heavy rain forced LPGA Thailand organizers to suspend second-round play on Friday. Play was halted for hours, and 13 players didn’t start, including co-leaders Ariya Jutanugarn of Thailand and Amy Yang of South Korea. The second round will resume on Saturday. Jutanugarn and Yang are at 6 under. Cristie Kerr and Shanshan Feng, who each birdied the one hole they played on Friday, are part of a six-way tie at 5 under. Click here for the full-field scores.last_img read more

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The ’97 Masters, 20 years later

first_imgTwenty years later, as they all predicted, nothing is the same. Not the reach. Not the style. Not the culture. And certainly not the protagonist himself. Golf was changed in such profound ways April 13, 1997, that the sport was essentially divided into two time periods, B.T. and A.T. – Before and After Tiger. Sure, Woods, with help from Nike, his $8-million-a-year sponsor, had already scripted his introduction eight months earlier, at his PGA Tour pro debut in Milwaukee. But his record- and spirit-breaking performance at the ’97 Masters shook golf to its core, transforming not only the current landscape but also inspiring a future generation of Tiger wannabes. Athletes and media members are prone to hyperbole – after all, how many “eras” have come and gone in the past six years? – but in the wake of Woods’ game-changing victory, shell-shocked pros proved prophetic on the kid’s seismic impact. He indeed would launch a new, prosperous epoch. And he would validate the idea that golfers were athletes. And, most of all, he would enjoy such a dominant reign that he stunted his peers’ careers and rewrote records and created unrealistic expectations for himself and everyone who followed. “The 1997 Masters wasn’t so much a ‘Hello, world’ moment,” says former No. 1 David Duval. “It was more like, Watch out, world.’’ IN THE SPRING OF 1997, Greg Norman was in the midst of a 96-week run atop the Official World Golf Ranking. Most weeks, players competed for a $270,000 first-place check. TV ratings reflected the sport’s niche status. And the only guys with six-packs were those who stopped by the 7-Eleven near the course. At the time, the fastest riser in the rankings was Tiger Woods. Still just 21, the would-be junior at Stanford had won three of his first nine starts and entered the Masters, his first major as a pro, at No. 13 in the world. It was the realization of two decades of relentless hype and potential, ever since he charmed “Mike Douglas Show” viewers as a diaper-wearing prodigy. A prolific winner at every level, Woods became a source of fascination among Tour players. “Before he came out, [Woods’ swing coach] Butch Harmon said if this kid can control his distance, you won’t be able to beat him,” Davis Love III says. “But Butch always said outlandish stuff, and I was like, Come on, Butch.” Woods’ legend only grew once he captured an unprecedented six consecutive USGA amateur titles. During his final U.S. Amateur, at Pumpkin Ridge, he squared off against hotshot junior Charles Howell III in the quarterfinals. Howell, who has now earned more than $32 million on Tour, lost that match, 2 and 1. “I didn’t know all the golfing gods in history were against me that day,” he says. Woods clearly had distinguished himself, not just with his awesome talent but his appearance. He was a mixed-race kid – his father, Earl, was African-American, while his mother, Tida, is Thai – playing the least racially integrated of all the major American sports.   No club symbolized golf’s well-earned reputation of exclusivity like Augusta National. The club’s co-founder, Clifford Roberts, once infamously said, “as long as I’m alive, golfers will be white, and caddies will be black.” No black golfer played the Masters until Lee Elder in 1975. (Only Jim Thorpe and Calvin Peete followed in the next two decades, before Woods made his first appearance in ’95.) Until 1982, all of the caddies in the tournament were black. Ron Townsend, a TV executive, became the club’s first black member in 1990, and only after the Shoal Creek debacle. Woods, who encountered racism while growing up in Southern California, was hesitant to play the race card. In 1995, before playing in the U.S. Open, he released a statement to the media, saying that his ethnic background “should not make a difference” and that he hoped to be recognized as a “golfer and a human being.” Later, he would, controversially, refer to his ethnic makeup as “Cablinasian.” But even more than the color of his skin, Woods appealed to the masses because of his dynamic style. He was telegenic and well-spoken, athletic and demonstrative. He possessed a self-belief and confidence that belied his age. And, yes, he hit the ball unfathomable distances, as he wound up his sinewy frame and pounded drives into the stratosphere. Steve Stricker was paired with Woods in early 1997. Then 29, Stricker was coming off a solid season in which he won twice and finished fourth on the money list. But it was obvious Woods played a game with which Stricker was unfamiliar. “I played with him at Pebble,” Stricker says, “and I said, ‘I don’t have that.’ He’s hitting it 310 or 315 and hitting 3-wood past my driver, and he just had this intimidating look about him and this belief in himself.” It was the same look that Jack Nicklaus and Arnold Palmer had seen a year earlier, during a practice round with Woods at the 1996 Masters. Afterward, Nicklaus was asked about the 20-year-old, who was playing his second Masters as an amateur. “Arnold and I both agree,” Nicklaus said, “that you could take his Masters (four) and my Masters (six) and add them together and this kid should win more than that.” And yet, Woods headed into the ’97 Masters without breaking par in his previous six rounds at Augusta, where he was a combined 11 over par. Oddsmakers still listed him at 8-1 to win – the same odds as Norman, the world No. 1, and defending champion Nick Faldo. Mark O’Meara knew better, having played a match with Woods the week before the Masters, at Isleworth, their home club in Florida. Woods shot 59. The next day, he went 5 under on the front nine, birdied 10 and then made a hole-in-one on 11. “I looked at him and I got in my cart and drove back to my house,” O’Meara recalls. “I’m like, this is ridiculous. I’m not playing with you anymore. I’m done.” Photo gallery: Round-by-round of Tiger’s win in the ’97 Masters AND THEN WOODS OPENED the Masters with a 40. Loose with his driver, he made a few rookie mistakes early alongside the intimidating Faldo, dropping shots on the first, fourth, eighth and ninth holes. Fuming as he marched to the 10th tee, he astutely diagnosed that his backswing was too long and out of position at the top. With one 2-iron swing off the 10th tee, it clicked. Birdie. Then he chipped in from a devilish spot behind the 12th green. “That was basically the start of his career,” Faldo says now, “and I say jokingly, from then on, we didn’t see him for the next 12 years.” Woods birdied 13 and then made eagle on the 500-yard 15th, where a mammoth drive left him only a 151-yard wedge into the green. He tacked on a birdie at 17 for a back-nine, 6-under 30, his opening 70 putting him only three back of early leader John Huston. “Everyone was giving energy,” Faldo says. “If you’re thinking about somebody, you’re giving him a bit of your energy. I remember him walking onto the range at Augusta and he was like a freight train of aura, just going, Woompf!, and every eye goes, Woompf!, and every camera goes, Woompf!, and the whole world is on the outside looking in.” Only Woods was unfazed. Friday afternoon, while paired with Paul Azinger, Woods went eagle-birdie-birdie on Nos. 13-15 to take the lead. It was the first time that Azinger had seen Woods play in person. “When he hit it,” Azinger says, “I looked at my caddie and was like, Holy s—.” At 8-under 136, Woods moved three clear of Colin Montgomerie, the surly Scot who was impressed, but not intimidated, by Woods’ play. Not yet, at least. “The pressure is mounting now,” Montgomerie told reporters. “Things always get harder here on the weekend. I have more major-championship experience than he has. We’ll just have to see what happens.” Those dismissive comments made their way back to Woods, and what happened Saturday was that he overpowered the course (needing no more than a 9-iron for his seven birdies) and dusted Monty, 65-74. Woods led by nine, a shellacking so emphatic that it left little doubt about who would slip into the green jacket a day later. “There was an aura about him that I witnessed that round of golf that I hadn’t seen before,” Montgomerie says. “Then I realized something was awry, something was different with this fellow.” After the third round, Montgomerie memorably staggered into the media building and proclaimed the tournament over. “All I have to say is one brief comment,” he started. “There is no chance. We’re all human beings here. There’s no chance humanly possible that Tiger is going to lose this tournament. No way.” But what about Norman’s collapse, only a year ago? “This is very different,” Montgomerie said. “Faldo’s not lying second, for a start. And Greg Norman’s not Tiger Woods.” Monty wasn’t the only player waving the white flag. Costantino Rocca rode shotgun in Sunday’s final pairing but conceded that he couldn’t catch Woods. “It’s too far,” he said. “Maybe if I play nine holes [and turn in my score].” Paul Stankowski held no illusions about making up a 10-shot deficit, either: “If I can make five, six, seven birdies early, like in the first three holes, then I definitely can put some heat on him.” Sensing the magnitude of the moment, CBS came on the air early Sunday, with Woods and Rocca on the fifth hole. Lance Barrow, directing the network’s Masters coverage for the first time, instructed his crew to show all of Woods’ shots live and to walk with him as he crossed all of Augusta National’s historic landmarks. “If that’s all the golf we show today,” he said, “then that’s all the golf we’re going to show.” The competition lacked suspense – Woods never led by fewer than eight – but the final round was no less captivating. It drew the highest rating ever for a golf telecast, with 14.1 percent of households tuning in, and produced two iconic highlights: Woods’ uppercut celebration and his emotional embrace with father Earl, still weak from triple-bypass surgery two months earlier, behind the 18th green. Tiger’s watershed victory was, as CBS’ Jim Nantz famously called, a “win for the ages.” Says Montgomerie: “We weren’t ready – I don’t think the world was quite aware – of what was to transpire.” Nearly 50 years to the day that Jackie Robinson shattered baseball’s color barrier, and with two dozen of the club’s black employees gathered outside the clubhouse, and with Elder following outside the ropes, Woods completed a masterpiece that was equal parts inspiring and demoralizing. Not only did his 18-under 270 total break Nicklaus’ Masters record, but his 12-stroke margin of victory was the largest in any major since 1862. “I beat all the mortals,” says runner-up Tom Kite. Even with a 43 1/2-inch steel-shafted driver, Woods led the field in driving distance – at 323 yards, he was 25 yards farther than the next-longest player – and bludgeoned the par 5s, playing them in 13 under for the week. Relying on a tip from his father and mental notes from his visit to the Golf Channel video library, he escaped without a three-putt on Augusta’s treacherous greens. And after that horrid start – the worst opening nine by a Masters winner, by two – he played his last 63 holes in 22 under. “It was the start of all of us being in awe,” Love says. “It was a clinic for all of us,” says Nick Price. “We were amazed. We knew that this was a whole new ballgame now.” “Power and distance is always an advantage,” Duval says, “but we saw precision and short game and putting and imagination – we saw all of it folded into one young man. It was the combination of what we thought a golfer could be.” Even the assembled media – increasingly skeptical of the Next Big Thing in sports – thought so, too. “Woods Launches New Era” declared The Augusta Chronicle. “The New Master” blasted the cover of the April 21, 1997, issue of Sports Illustrated. “Woods Tears Up Augusta and Tears Down Barriers” wrote The New York Times. In the winner’s news conference, Woods paid homage to the pioneers who had come before him – to Charlie Sifford and Ted Rhodes and Elder, who had driven over from Atlanta that Sunday and was in tears near Butler Cabin. “All night I was thinking about them,” Woods said, “what they’ve done for me and the game of golf. Coming up 18, I said a little prayer of thanks to those guys. Those guys are the ones who did it.” After all of his obligations, Woods retired to his rental house with family and friends. After a while, attendees noticed that Woods was no longer amid the revelry. They found him alone in his room – passed out on his bed, with his red sweater and black slacks still on, clutching the green jacket like a blanket. “That’s the image that remains in my mind of what that meant to him,” says close friend and former Stanford teammate Notah Begay III, “that he didn’t want to ever let go of that feeling because he has touched a place that no one has ever touched. The way that he did it, the way that he impacted our game, the way that he carried the game to new heights, I don’t know if we will see that for some time.” Tiger Woods, ’97 Masters (*= record) Score Overall Position Round 1 2-under 70 2 under (70) T-4, 4 back Round 2 6-under 66 8 under (136) 1st, 3 ahead Round 3 7-under 65 15 under (201)* 1st, 9 ahead* Round 4 3-under 69 18 under (270)* Won by 12* MANY ASPECTS OF THE PGA Tour changed after the ’97 Masters, but initially there remained a sense that Woods did not yet belong. That was apparent when CNN aired a clip of off-color remarks made by fellow competitor Fuzzy Zoeller, in which he called Woods “that little boy” and urged him not to serve fried chicken and collard greens at the Champions Dinner the following year. Vacationing in Cancun after the Masters, Woods didn’t respond for a few days, prolonging the controversy, and Zoeller lost endorsements and fans. (Woods also received flak for skipping a ceremony to honor Jackie Robinson at Shea Stadium.) Woods addressed the Zoeller situation in a statement to the press, not a phone call, calling the remarks “unfortunate” and “out of bounds.” They later cleared the air over lunch at Colonial. It was the lone rift during an otherwise blissful period for the PGA Tour. Six weeks after the Masters drew the highest rating ever for a major, commissioner Tim Finchem met with his three network partners (NBC, CBS and ABC) to renew their four-year deal that would go into effect in 1999. Never had he enjoyed so much negotiating power. Even though Woods would hold the No. 1 ranking for only 10 total weeks in ’97, he was the undisputed biggest star in the game. Tournament directors tried to entice him. Viewers tuned in to watch him. Whatever resentment existed toward Woods and his new celebrity soon dissipated, because his mere presence on Tour meant one thing for the rank and file: They were all about to become fabulously wealthy. In 1996, Tour purses were a combined $71 million. Over the next decade, thanks in large part to Woods, who attracted more corporate sponsorships and sparked higher TV rights fees, Tour pros competed for nearly $279 million in 2008. (Viewed another way: In 1996, there were nine millionaires on the Tour’s money list; a decade later, 93 players earned $1 million or more.) That would continue to grow, with the advent of the FedEx Cup and its $10 million end-of-season prize. In terms of per-year earnings, the best golfers were now more aligned with the stars in other sports. “The Tour was the greatest thing in the world, the biggest stage I could ever imagine,” says Duval, who turned pro in 1993. “But only in the next decade did I understand that it could be so much bigger and more impactful.” Adds Curtis Strange: “It changed overnight, where it hadn’t changed much the previous 30 or 40 years.” Even more dramatic was the shifting perception of golfers as athletes. Tour pros used to be the castoffs from other sports – the guys who were too small or too fat or too slow. Fueled by his obsession with Navy SEALs, Woods popularized strength training and morphed from 1-iron-thin to a broad-shouldered, physical marvel. The ill-fitting polos and sweaters from the late ’90s were replaced by skin-tight garb that accentuated his muscular physique. Today’s Tour has caught up, and now it’s rare to stroll down the range and see a player who is out of shape, who doesn’t have veins protruding from his biceps or glutes that would make an alpine skier jealous. In addition to his ripped appearance, Woods also oozed swagger and charisma, and his intense on-course displays – the fist pumps and the club twirls and the birdie stalks – shattered the paradigm of golf as a stuffy, gentlemanly pursuit and appealed to a younger generation that grew up watching other sports. “When I started playing golf, back in the late ’60s and early ’70s, golf really wasn’t that cool,” O’Meara says. “It was cool to the country-club golfer, but not necessarily to the masses. Tiger brought golf to the masses, and all of a sudden made it cool to where parents started thinking about, ‘hey, instead of having my child play baseball or football or basketball, maybe I’ll introduce my child into golf.’ We saw this big boom of a younger generation.” Says former Tour pro Arron Oberholser: “Tiger’s is the last generation that went through high school and got laughed at for playing golf.” Though it’s likely all of that muscle mass on a brittle body helped expedite his decline, in the midst of that transformation Woods continued to play mesmerizing golf. He said after the ’97 Masters that he’d “gotten away with murder” and “from a ball-striking standpoint, I was playing better than I knew how.” And so, under the guidance of Harmon, Woods tore down his swing and started again. What they built produced the most remarkable stretch in golf history. Beginning with the 1999 PGA, Woods won five of six majors, including a 15-shot blowout at the U.S. Open and the completion of the Tiger Slam (four consecutive majors won). From 1999-2007, he was astoundingly consistent, winning at least five tournaments in all but one season and making the cut in a record 142 consecutive events. Even after rebuilding his swing again, in the mid-2000s under Hank Haney, Woods added six more major titles and won a preposterous 33 percent of his starts. He kept a stranglehold on both the world ranking – spending 683 weeks at No. 1, more than twice the stay of Norman (331) – and his peers, as none of his so-called rivals captured more than four majors during his 12-year reign. “If Tiger had his A-game, we felt like he was really hard to beat,” Love says. “The media and the fans thought we were giving up, but it wasn’t giving up. It was just reality.” One place that Woods’ dominance slowed was Augusta National. Instead of owning 10 (or more) green jackets, as Nicklaus and Palmer forecasted, Woods’ closet has held only four, and none since 2005. The calls to Tiger-proof Augusta began early, in ’97, after Woods rendered the once-mighty course obsolete by demolishing the par 5s. “It’ll be interesting to see what they do to their golf course,” Price said at the time. “They have to do something.” And so prior to 2002, the club beefed up half of the holes with added length, then planted trees alongside the 11th and 15th fairways. They lengthened a few holes even more before the ’06 event – at 7,435 yards, the course is now 510 yards longer than in ’97 – as well as tightening some fairways and growing the first cut. Woods and many others agree that some of the excitement and creativity has been lost because of the course changes (and technological advancements), even though Jordan Spieth in 2015 matched Woods’ 18-under 270 total. The spark that Woods’ breakthrough was supposed to give minorities fizzled out, too. In November 1997, the World Golf Federation established The First Tee to introduce the game to disadvantaged kids. Millions of children, particularly those in inner cities and rural areas, have been exposed to golf, but participation numbers remain low. It seems not even a global superstar like Woods could overcome some of society’s structural impediments, and the game is as homogenous as it’s ever been: In 1977, 12 black golfers played in a Tour event. Last year, there was only one (Harold Varner III). “There are parents spending hundreds of thousands of dollars a year to send their kids to 10 to 12 tournaments throughout the year,” says Begay, “and not many people can afford to do that. It’s just not realistic. So I think the swell of interest was created, but it was never captured.” AFTER 20 YEARS, AFTER the unmistakable start of the Tiger era, the game in many respects is unrecognizable. Woods in ’97 was the only player in the OWGR top 10 under age 25. Today, he’d be one of four.  He was the second-biggest hitter, at 294.8 yards per drive. Today, in an era of 460cc drivers and multi-layer balls, he’d rank 74th.   He was the leading money winner, with $2.06 million in earnings. Last year, he’d rank 45th. So, no, 20 years later, nothing is the same, including Woods himself. Lost in the hysteria of the ’97 Masters was the sage advice that Palmer had offered Woods as he began his fishbowl existence.  “One thing Tiger said to me was that the public won’t let him act like a 21-year-old man,” Palmer said that week. “Well, how many 21-year-old men are in the position that Tiger Woods is in? And I said, ‘Hey, that’s the price you must pay for the position you’re in, whether it be financially or as a champion. There has to be a penalty somewhere for all the nice things that happen to you.’” Indeed, fame, scandal, hubris, injury – they all contributed to the downfall of a legend who, if he misses next week’s Masters for the third time in four years, will drop outside the top 750 in the world ranking. The irony is impossible to ignore: The generation that Woods helped create with his transcendent Masters victory – the young stars who think and act like him, who chase his records and his standard for greatness, who have emerged A.T., After Tiger – is now one of his biggest obstacles in a return to relevance. That competitive reality only underscores the event’s historical significance. “You have to recognize it for what it was,” Duval says. “It was a big breaking of a barrier that any athlete can play this game if they put their mind to it. But it was also a pronouncement of a lot of expectations for him as a young person, and it was kind of like, Here I am. That’s a strong thing to do, but as you look back on it, it was also very telling of what he thought and where he was headed and what he believed he was going to do. That’s pretty freakin’ cool.”last_img read more

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No easy solution for problems with OWGR

first_imgST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. – Brooks Koepka moved back into the top spot in the Official World Golf Ranking from his couch on Monday, and depending on a variety of scenarios this week at the Dunlop Phoenix event in Japan where the three-time major champion is playing, he could be overtaken by Justin Rose … who is spending this week on his couch. The world rankings are golf’s version of the College Football Playoffs – confusing at times, arbitrary at others and even polarizing. But it’s not Koepka and Rose’s game of musical chairs atop the list that’s most compelling. The frontmen for the world’s two most high-profile tours also appear to be taking a long look at the math and madness of the rankings, at least if current comments are any indication. Two weeks ago at the Turkish Airlines Open, European Tour chief executive Keith Pelley was asked about his circuit’s relationship with Rolex, which is the title sponsor of the tour’s eight Rolex Series events. That Pelley’s response drifted into an examination of the OWGR was telling. “I look at fields completely different and I don’t evaluate the fields strictly on world ranking points,” Pelley said. “Take the British Masters, for example. Who had a stronger field, CIMB [Classic] or the British Masters?” According to the Official World Golf Ranking, it wasn’t much of a competition, with the Tour winner in Malaysia receiving 48 points with a strength of field of 289. The British Masters winner received 38 points with a strength of field of 206. RSM Classic: Articles, photos and videos But Pelley’s assessment went well beyond the math. “If you look at it in terms of the legend’s category they had Ernie Els. We had four former world No. 1’s. Take Justin Rose out, we had Luke Donald, Lee Westwood and Martin Kaymer,” Pelley said. “From the consumers perspective and from the partner’s perspective what’s a better field? What’s going to resonate more with consumers?” From Pelley’s vantage point the world rankings only tell part of the story, which is understandable considering that the European Tour had a stronger field than that week’s PGA Tour event just seven times in 2018. That the U.S. tour has deeper fields on a more consistent basis is no surprise, but what is likely more concerning for Pelley is that the PGA Tour continues to expand the gap between the two circuits. In fact, this year’s Turkish Airlines Open, which is one of Europe’s three finals events, dropped behind the corresponding Tour event this year according to the ranking. “Since 2015 the U.S. players have come up in the world ranking and the European Tour players have gone down, that’s a fact,” Pelley said. The PGA Tour’s advantage in the ranking is unrivaled but it appears Pelley’s counterpart in the United States is just as interested in the inner workings of the rankings. In September at the Tour Championship, officials indicated that the rankings would go through an independent review, and last week in an exclusive interview with GolfChannel.com, Tour commissioner Jay Monahan explained the goal of that review. “The world ranking system has operated the same way for a long period of time. As a group we are going through an exercise where whether then us assessing our own system let’s get some outside counsel and outside perspective on whether the world golf ranking system is meeting its intention,” Monahan said. “I’d say it’s standard, but we have not gone through that exercise as long as I’ve been there, which is something that any business would do.” Monahan said the review was “ongoing” and that there was no time frame for any potential tweaks, but you don’t have to dig too deep to find potential problems from the Tour’s perspective. Included among the seven European Tour events that had stronger fields in 2018 – a comparison that doesn’t include the majors or World Golf Championship events that are co-sanctioned by both tours – was the BMW PGA Championship, which is the continent’s flagship event. The winner at the BMW PGA received 64 points. The winner at that week’s event on the PGA Tour (Fort Worth Invitational) received 56 points despite the event actually having a higher strength of field (412) than that in England (283). At issue is the minimum built into the ranking that mandates the number of points awarded at flagship events, which is a threshold that all six “leading” tours have, and an example of what the independent review will likely be studying. The Official World Golf Ranking isn’t perfect and, like the College Football Playoffs it probably never will be, but with so much now riding on a player’s ranking – from access into top events to contract bonuses – it’s time to take a deep dive into the complicated arithmetic. It’s also clear that not everyone is going to like the outcome.last_img read more

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‘No Quitting Now’

first_imgJoe Stone uses his arms to pedal his recumbent bicycle up the steep grade of Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park. The crash knocked him unconscious, broke four ribs, seven vertebrae, punctured his right lung and liver, and damaged his heart and spinal cord. “I actually don’t remember anything from that (day),” he said. “My knowledge of this is through what eyewitnesses said.” As Stone lay there, lifeless in the tall grass, witnesses ran to his side and called 911. Soon he was being loaded into a helicopter destined for Missoula’s St. Patrick Hospital where he spent the next few days in the ICU. It didn’t look like he would survive, according to his childhood friend Tyler Sweeney. “We thought for sure he was going to die,” he said. Stone was put into an induced coma for three and a half weeks following the accident, before being moved back to his native Minnesota, so both he and his girlfriend Amy could be close to family. “My personal story doesn’t really start until after I came out of my coma,” he said. And when he did, Stone found that he was paralyzed from the chest down and unable to move his legs. He began eight months of therapy, which started with just sitting up. After a few months in the hospital, Stone moved into a new home with his girlfriend in Minnesota. It was during this time that Stone realized there was a major void in his life. “My whole life was my hobbies,” he said. “I loved the outdoors … Every weekend I was off in the mountains.” Stone was determined not to let the accident, which could have taken his life, alter his lifestyle. Just a few months into his therapy, Stone came up with the idea of hand cycling Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park. It was the perfect plan, he thought, because biking the road was something he had always wanted to do. It was a plan that surprised Sweeney. “When he said he wanted to do it this summer I was shocked. I mean he was still in rehab,” Sweeney said, remembering back to earlier this year when his friend first proposed the idea. In the spring of 2011, planning began for a return trip to Montana and to cycle the iconic 50-mile road. To bike the road Stone found a hand cycle and soon after his physical therapy was complete he began training endlessly for the trip, which was to take place before the first anniversary of the accident. Last week Stone gathered with a group of friends and headed into the park, starting the trip up and over Logan Pass early on Friday morning. Shortly after noon, Stone came around the corner and was able to see the pass across the valley, another two miles away on the twisting and turning road, jammed with summer traffic. Email LOGAN PASS – Joe Stone lives by his goals. His first goal following the accident was to simply breath on his own again; then sit up on his own again; and finally to be on his own again. Each time he has achieved his goals with remarkable speed. And last Friday morning – at just under two miles per hour – he was doing it again. As he rounded the corner his most ambitious goal yet was before him: Logan Pass. As the sun jetted down mountain valleys, illuminating wild flowers and snow piles, Stone slowly biked his way up the steep road, his arms working like a locomotive’s pistons: in and out; in and out; in and out. “Baby steps,” he whispered to himself between heavy breaths. Almost a year to the day that Stone was paralyzed in an accident he was biking the Going-to-the-Sun Road. On Aug. 13, 2010, Stone, who was born and raised in Minnesota but moved to Missoula to be closer to the outdoor activities he loved, was about to make his forth speed-flying run of the day from the face of Mount Jumbo, a sport similar to paragliding. Shortly after 8 p.m. he ran and jumped off the mountain and began to descend. Moments after he took to the air, according to witnesses and news reports, his chute got tangled and he began to plummet to earth. Stone estimated he hit the ground anywhere from 50 to 60 miles per hour. By cranking the handlebars on his recumbent bicycle in a circular motion, Joe Stone ascends Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park. Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. It was a long way from his accident 364 days earlier. Patrick Kinville, a childhood friend who was also biking, couldn’t help but smile as he watched Stone slowly roll up the road. “Initially it didn’t look like he was going to make it,” he said, thinking back to the accident. “So this never crossed my mind.” Stone said that biking the road was the first step in getting his life back. “It’s cool that I’m doing something I wanted to do anyway. Now I’m just doing it with my arms rather than my legs. I’ve done a lot of big things in my life, but none of it compares to this,” Stone said. “It’ll be the biggest moment of my life.” And even as his newest goal was within reach, Stone was already thinking of the next. Stone has been blogging about his recovery and hopes to turn it into a nonprofit group to help him reach out to people in similar situations. Stone may make the same bike trip next year as a way to raise money for others and eventually he wants to open a camp in Montana. “That’s the big dream in the end,” he said. “But it looks like it’ll be a lifelong thing.” As he biked past a long rock wall, high above the valley floor, Stone began to turn the hand cycle toward the side of the road to catch his breath and let traffic pass. But he wasn’t about to give up. “There’s no quitting now,” he said, pointing to the road behind him. “Not after that.” last_img read more

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