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Trump wasn’t always so linguistically challenged. What could explain the change?

first_img Related: Leave this field empty if you’re human: In interviews Trump gave in the 1980s and 1990s (with Tom Brokaw, David Letterman, Oprah Winfrey, Charlie Rose, and others), he spoke articulately, used sophisticated vocabulary, inserted dependent clauses into his sentences without losing his train of thought, and strung together sentences into a polished paragraph, which — and this is no mean feat — would have scanned just fine in print. This was so even when reporters asked tough questions about, for instance, his divorce, his brush with bankruptcy, and why he doesn’t build housing for working-class Americans. Donald Trump on Larry King Live in 1987Volume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/2017/05/23/donald-trump-speaking-style-interviews/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0000:4200:42  In an interview from 1987, Donald Trump talks about poverty and homelessness in the US. Via YouTube Trump fluently peppered his answers with words and phrases such as “subsided,” “inclination,” “discredited,” “sparring session,” and “a certain innate intelligence.” He tossed off well-turned sentences such as, “It could have been a contentious route,” and, “These are the only casinos in the United States that are so rated.” He even offered thoughtful, articulate aphorisms: “If you get into what’s missing, you don’t appreciate what you have,” and, “Adversity is a very funny thing.”Now, Trump’s vocabulary is simpler. He repeats himself over and over, and lurches from one subject to an unrelated one, as in this answer during an interview with the Associated Press last month:“People want the border wall. My base definitely wants the border wall, my base really wants it — you’ve been to many of the rallies. OK, the thing they want more than anything is the wall. My base, which is a big base; I think my base is 45 percent. You know, it’s funny. The Democrats, they have a big advantage in the Electoral College. Big, big, big advantage. … The Electoral College is very difficult for a Republican to win, and I will tell you, the people want to see it. They want to see the wall.”For decades, studies have found that deterioration in the fluency, complexity, and vocabulary level of spontaneous speech can indicate slipping brain function due to normal aging or neurodegenerative disease. STAT and the experts therefore considered only unscripted utterances, not planned speeches and statements, since only the former tap the neural networks that offer a window into brain function. @sxbegle President Trump on alleged collusion with RussiaVolume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/2017/05/23/donald-trump-speaking-style-interviews/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0000:1300:13  President Trump denied his campaign colluded with Russia while speaking at a press conference in May 2017. Via YouTube He was not always so linguistically challenged.STAT reviewed decades of Trump’s on-air interviews and compared them to Q&A sessions since his inauguration. The differences are striking and unmistakable.advertisement Related: ‘Crazy like a fox’: Mental health experts try to get inside Trump’s mind Newsletters Sign up for Daily Recap A roundup of STAT’s top stories of the day. By Sharon Begley May 23, 2017 Reprints Dom Smith/STAT Privacy Policy Senior Writer, Science and Discovery (1956-2021) Sharon covered science and discovery. Reporter’s notebook: I never thought I’d be writing about Trump’s mind Sharon Begley Please enter a valid email address.center_img Research has shown that changes in speaking style can result from cognitive decline. STAT therefore asked experts in neurolinguistics and cognitive assessment, as well as psychologists and psychiatrists, to compare Trump’s speech from decades ago to that in 2017; they all agreed there had been a deterioration, and some said it could reflect changes in the health of Trump’s brain. It was the kind of utterance that makes professional transcribers question their career choice:“ … there is no collusion between certainly myself and my campaign, but I can always speak for myself — and the Russians, zero.”When President Trump offered that response to a question at a press conference last week, it was the latest example of his tortured syntax, mid-thought changes of subject, and apparent trouble formulating complete sentences, let alone a coherent paragraph, in unscripted speech.advertisement State of (Trump’s) MindTrump wasn’t always so linguistically challenged. What could explain the change? Privacy Policy Leave this field empty if you’re human: Northwestern University psychology professor Dan McAdams, a critic of Trump who has inferred his psychological makeup from his public behavior, said any cognitive decline in the president might reflect normal aging and not dementia. “Research shows that virtually nobody is as sharp at age 70 as they were at age 40,” he said. “A wide range of cognitive functions, including verbal fluency, begin to decline long before we hit retirement age. So, no surprise here.”Researchers have used neurolinguistics analysis of past presidents to detect, retrospectively, early Alzheimer’s disease. In a famous 2015 study, scientists at Arizona State University evaluated how Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush spoke at their news conferences. Reagan’s speech was riddled with indefinite nouns (something, anything), “low imageability” verbs (have, go, get), incomplete sentences, limited vocabulary, simple grammar, and fillers (well, basically, um, ah, so) — all characteristic of cognitive problems. That suggested Reagan’s brain was slipping just a few years into his 1981-1989 tenure; that decline continued. He was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 1994. Bush showed no linguistic deterioration; he remained mentally sharp throughout his 1989-1993 tenure and beyond.Sharon Begley answered reader questions about this article on Facebook. Read the conversation here. Newsletters Sign up for Daily Recap A roundup of STAT’s top stories of the day. About the Author Reprints The experts noted clear changes from Trump’s unscripted answers 30 years ago to those in 2017, in some cases stark enough to raise questions about his brain health. They noted, however, that the same sort of linguistic decline can also reflect stress, frustration, anger, or just plain fatigue.Ben Michaelis, a psychologist in New York City, performed cognitive assessments at the behest of the New York Supreme Court and criminal courts and taught the technique at a hospital and university. “There are clearly some changes in Trump as a speaker” since the 1980s, said Michaelis, who does not support Trump, including a “clear reduction in linguistic sophistication over time,” with “simpler word choices and sentence structure. … In fairness to Trump, he’s 70, so some decline in his cognitive functioning over time would be expected.”Some sentences, or partial sentences, would, if written, make a second-grade teacher despair. “We’ll do some questions, unless you have enough questions,” Trump told a February press conference. And last week, he told NBC’s Lester Holt, “When I did this now I said, I probably, maybe will confuse people, maybe I’ll expand that, you know, lengthen the time because it should be over with, in my opinion, should have been over with a long time ago.” President Trump on NBC Nightly NewsVolume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/2017/05/23/donald-trump-speaking-style-interviews/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0000:1300:13  In an interview conducted earlier this month, President Trump explains the timing of James Comey’s firing. Via YouTube Other sentences are missing words. Again, from the AP: “If they don’t treat fairly, I am terminating NAFTA,” and, “I don’t support or unsupport” — leaving out a “me” in the first and an “it” (or more specific noun) in the second. Other sentences simply don’t track: “From the time I took office til now, you know, it’s a very exact thing. It’s not like generalities.”There are numerous contrasting examples from decades ago, including this — with sophisticated grammar and syntax, and a coherent paragraph-length chain of thought — from a 1992 Charlie Rose interview: “Ross Perot, he made some monumental mistakes. Had he not dropped out of the election, had he not made the gaffes about the watch dogs and the guard dogs, if he didn’t have three or four bad days — and they were real bad days — he could have conceivably won this crazy election.”The change in linguistic facility could be strategic; maybe Trump thinks his supporters like to hear him speak simply and with more passion than proper syntax. “He may be using it as a strategy to appeal to certain types of people,” said Michaelis. But linguistic decline is also obvious in two interviews with David Letterman, in 1988 and 2013, presumably with much the same kind of audience. In the first, Trump threw around words such as “aesthetically” and “precarious,” and used long, complex sentences. In the second, he used simpler speech patterns, few polysyllabic words, and noticeably more fillers such as “uh” and “I mean.” Donald Trump interview with Charlie Rose in 1992Volume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/2017/05/23/donald-trump-speaking-style-interviews/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0000:1800:18  Donald Trump shares his take on Ross Perot’s 1992 presidential campaign. Via YouTube The reason linguistic and cognitive decline often go hand in hand, studies show, is that fluency reflects the performance of the brain’s prefrontal cortex, the seat of higher-order cognitive functions such as working memory, judgment, understanding, and planning, as well as the temporal lobe, which searches for and retrieves the right words from memory. Neurologists therefore use tests of verbal fluency, and especially how it has changed over time, to assess cognitive status.Those tests ask, for instance, how many words beginning with W a patient can list, and how many breeds of dogs he can name, rather than have patients speak spontaneously. The latter “is too hard to score,” said neuropsychologist Sterling Johnson, of the University of Wisconsin, who studies brain function in Alzheimer’s disease. “But everyday speech is definitely a way of measuring cognitive decline. If people are noticing [a change in Trump’s language agility], that’s meaningful.” [email protected] Please enter a valid email address. Although neither Johnson nor other experts STAT consulted said the apparent loss of linguistic fluency was unambiguous evidence of mental decline, most thought something was going on.John Montgomery, a psychologist in New York City and adjunct professor at New York University, said “it’s hard to say definitively without rigorous testing” of Trump’s speaking patterns, “but I think it’s pretty safe to say that Trump has had significant cognitive decline over the years.”No one observing Trump from afar, though, can tell whether that’s “an indication of dementia, of normal cognitive decline that many people experience as they age, or whether it’s due to other factors” such as stress and emotional upheaval, said Montgomery, who is not a Trump supporter.Even a Trump supporter saw and heard striking differences between interviews from the 1980s and 1990s and those of 2017, however. “I can see what people are responding to,” said Dr. Robert Pyles, a psychiatrist in suburban Boston. He heard “a difference in tone and pace. … What I did not detect was any gaps in mentation or meaning. I don’t see any clear evidence of neurological or cognitive dysfunction.”Johnson cautioned that language can deteriorate for other reasons. “His language difficulties could be due to the immense pressure he’s under, or to annoyance that things aren’t going right and that there are all these scandals,” he said. “It could also be due to a neurodegenerative disease or the normal cognitive decline that comes with aging.” Trump will be 71 next month. Tags Donald Trumpneurologypolicylast_img read more

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WATCH: Electric Picnic owner talks about future of the festival

first_imgHome Lifestyle Electric Picnic WATCH: Electric Picnic owner talks about future of the festival LifestyleElectric Picnic Facebook Facebook Charlie Flanagan on Electric Picnic: ‘I’d ask organisers to consult with community leaders’ Twitter TAGSElectric PicnicElectric Picnic 2018 Five Laois monuments to receive almost €200,000 in government funding Pinterest RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp New Arles road opens but disquiet over who was invited to official opening Community Brought to you in association with Expert Laois Electric Picnic boss Melvin Benn spoke about the future of Electric Picnic and where he sees it going in the next nine years to members of the press today.He said: “We’re not standing still, I think it’s better than last year and the festival goers will think it’s better than last year.”When asked if he has any plans to expand the picnic, he said they hadn’t considered it, but also haven’t ruled it out.“I don’t know that yet, I haven’t taken a decision on that at the moment. I would like to add more things into the picnic, we’re constantly trying to grow it, change it and improve it. There’s an opportunity on a little bit of growth but there’s no decision on that for the moment.“The Picnic is an opportunity to let go of everything at the end of the summer and have a final blowout before the autumn or the winter. Behave safely but come and have the craic really,” he added.Security levels, acts and new featuresThe security levels will be the same as last year and the Electric Picnic organiser is looking forward to the stellar lineup.“Kendrick is one of the biggest stars in the world at the moment. There’s been rave reviews for him in the UK press following his performances at the Reading and Leeds festivals. I think that’s a treat for Friday night which is going to be extraordinary.“Massive Attack of course are probably one of the ultimate Picnic bands and certainly one of my favourite bands of all time.“I think there’s a lot for everyone, there’s Chic and Nile Rodgers, the Story of HipHop, there’s Sigrid, Dua Lupa – there’s a great body of a lineup across the board.  It’s fantastic for music lovers over all,” he said.He also spoke about the more unusual elements of the Electric Picnic, such as the La Fura dels Baus  with their dramatic show, ‘Human Seed’ – where the 24-strong troupe will create a mesmerising human pyramid and be raised to a death defying 40 foot over the estate, and on skiing during the Picnic.“I’m expecting really an extraordinary spectacle on Friday and Saturday with La Fura dels Baus That looks amazing, we’ve been planning that for a long time.Then little things like being able to do a bit of Apres Ski in the middle of the picnic when it’s actually going to be quite warm!” he laughed.You can check out his full interview here.SEE ALSO – WATCH: Exclusive look at the 2018 Electric Picnic site Pinterest Community WhatsApp By Siun Lennon – 28th August 2018 Council Previous articleLaois dual player faces dilemma due to fixture clashNext articleCycling from Dublin to Stradbally, celebrity customers and ‘the greatest concert venue in the world’ Siun Lennonhttp://heresosiun.blogspot.ie/2016/09/the-lekkie-piccie-experience.htmlSiún Lennon joined LaoisToday in a full-time capacity after studying Journalism and New Media in the University of Limerick. She hails from Rosenallis and her interests vary from news, sports and politics. WATCH: Electric Picnic owner talks about future of the festival Twitterlast_img read more

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Interest rate hike has yet to impact demand for debt: RBC report

first_img Although the Bank of Canada (BoC) began to increase interest rates in July, the expectation that Canadians will curb their growing appetite for debt in tandem has yet to happen, according to a new report from Royal Bank of Canada’s (RBC) economics department. In fact, Canadian households were adding debt at the fastest pace since October 2011 in July, when the BoC increased its benchmark interest rate by 25 basis points, the report says. It adds that outstanding balances rose by 5.7% compared with July 2016, pushing total household debt to almost $2.1 trillion. Fed warns U.S. financial system remains vulnerable James Langton Related news Consumer credit — including lines of credit, personal loans and credit cards — continues to enjoy strong growth, the report says: “An uptrend in consumer credit accumulation has continued relatively unimpeded since early 2016 and is now well above the cycle lows seen in the latter half of 2013 —before the Bank of Canada cut policy rates in response to the crude oil price plunge.” At the same time, residential mortgage growth also picked up in the first half of 2017, the RBC report states, noting that “The introduction of mortgage qualifying standards by the federal government in October 2016 ostensibly had a minimal dampening effect on mortgage loan growth. Instead robust home sales in early 2017 appeared to drive a strong uptick in mortgage demand earlier this year.” More recently, home sales have slowed, and this is expected to flow through to mortgage demand in the coming months. In addition, RBC expects interest rate hikes to begin denting the demand for debt eventually as well. “As support builds for further monetary tightening, the borrowing binge evident in recent quarters is likely to subside,” the RBC report says. “A notable shift in major housing markets alongside elevated household indebtedness and tighter financial conditions are likely to dampen credit growth and eventually temper consumer spending growth.” Rising interest rates could dampen stimulus impact: PBOcenter_img Income inequality narrowed amid fiscal supports in 2020: StatsCan Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Keywords Interest rates,  Consumer borrowing and saving Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

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Congresswoman Jaime Herrera Beutler introduces Police Reform Bill in House

first_imgJUSTICE Act addresses police reforms, law enforcement accountability, transparencyToday, Congresswoman Jaime Herrera Beutler (WA-03) joined her colleagues in introducing companion legislation in the House to Sen. Tim Scott’s bill, the JUSTICE Act, legislation designed to create improvements to policing practices, and improve accountability and transparency among law enforcement.Congresswoman Jaime Herrera BeutlerCongresswoman Jaime Herrera Beutler“It’s time for Congress to take action to make sure every single one of us is treated equally, has the same access to justice, and can count on law enforcement to keep us safe,” Herrera Beutler said. “I’m proud to help introduce the JUSTICE Act in the House to improve police training, and ultimately bring about positive changes to policing practices so our law enforcement can continue to responsibly protect and serve our communities, while also working to end racial injustice.”Here’s a summary of what the JUSTICE Act is designed to accomplish:• Strengthens training methods and tactics, especially regarding de-escalation of force, and will take critical steps to end the use of chokeholds by withholding federal funds from law enforcement agencies that do not ban the maneuver in situations where deadly force is not authorized• Reforms hiring practices to ensure law enforcement better reflects their communities• Ensures disciplinary records of law enforcement officers are shared during the hiring process. There have been multiple instances of officers involved in tragic interactions having past discipline issues of which the current employer was unaware.• Funds additional body cameras and data maintenance• Requires reporting and justification of “no knock warrants” and when an officer has discharged a weapon or used force• Establishes the National Criminal Justice Commission to complete a comprehensive review of the criminal justice system• Creates a commission to offer solutions to a broad range of challenges facing black men and boys, based on bipartisan legislation introduced by Rep. Frederica Wilson (FL)• Makes lynching a federal crime• Closes the consent loophole to make officers engaging in a sexual act with an individual in custody a crimeThe full text of the JUSTICE Act is available here (https://jhb.house.gov/uploadedfiles/staumn_049_xml.pdf), and a section by section analysis is available here (https://jhb.house.gov/uploadedfiles/justice_act_section_by_section_pdf.pdf).AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:Clark CountyLatestshare 0 Previous : Sale of fireworks begins June 28 Next : Clark County faces uphill battle in effort to test all long-term care facilitiesAdvertisementThis is placeholder text Congresswoman Jaime Herrera Beutler introduces Police Reform Bill in HousePosted by ClarkCountyToday.comDate: Thursday, June 18, 2020in: Newsshare 0 last_img read more

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Tomorrow’s leaders: Class of 2020

first_img Graduating from college means that I get to officially pursue my dream of becoming an educator. It means that after years of hard work and commitment, I finally have the opportunity to teach tiny humans to love learning as much as I do. It means that the struggle of being a tired college student working part time and pouring their whole heart into their school work was worth it.”–Anne Fisher (Edu’20) Read More This is your time to choose. And I’m not just talking about your major, friend groups and next chapter of employment—although those are foundational for your college experience. This is the time to navigate, clarify and define the ‘thing’ you’re willing to stand unapologetically for. Knowing what I know now, I invite you to reflect on your lived experiences, values and identity to pinpoint.”–Cam Perdido (Psych’20) Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Graduating from the University of Colorado Boulder is an extremely proud moment for me as both a student and a teacher. I struggled for years to learn how to be a student (which is a great lesson for my students as well). My path to this moment was not a direct one. Today, I celebrate with my fellow graduates, but as a teacher, I recognize that I am also a lifelong learner. Although I graduate this year, I feel that my education will never be over. I will be back to continue to learn how I can support my students and help them achieve success in the classroom and in their futures.–William Ostendorf (MEdu’20) Read More It’s difficult to choose one superlative experience from my five years at CU—I feel like my time here has literally been a highlight reel, and I am so thankful for all of the opportunities I’ve been given. Solo recitals, competitions, roles with Eklund Opera and writing my honors thesis have all been transformative experiences I will carry into the next chapter of my career. I have learned that taking an unconventional path yields incredible results. If I had not pursued such diverse musical interests, I would not be the musician and scholar I am today.–Sophia Zervas (Mus’20) Read More The greatest experience I had at CU was my time in Colombia. Being able to study abroad in a country that is so incredibly different from what I have experienced and being able to help build a community space for the neighborhood that so desperately needed it was the most fulfilling thing I have done in my entire life, even if I did dislocate my knee in the process.”–Ian Klene (EnvDes’20) Read More As I move on from this chapter of my life, holding all that I have learned and experiences I have grown through, I think the greatest lesson I will carry with me is to be curious, to be critical and to act. There will always be room for personal reflection and growth, which aides in how you show up for your community, and there is always space to use the power you bring in this world to heal further. There is goodness. There is strife. There is utter despair. And there is our resolve. Determine how you show up and be there, all there.”–Olivia Gardner, CUSG director of diversity and inclusion (EthnSt, WomSt’20) Based on what I know now, my advice to other students—particularly law students—would be to focus on friendships. Yes, law school is competitive, and while we all want to succeed, it’s important to not let the competition get in the way of making meaningful relationships with your classmates. When I look back on my time at CU, what I’ll always cherish most are the friendships that I’ve made that I know I will carry with me for the rest of my life. We were there for each other during finals, during job searches, and when we dealt with personal struggles. I can’t imagine having gone through law school without them.So my advice to other students is: be kind to others, focus on friendships, and don’t let the competitiveness of law school get in the way of what is really important.”–Tyler Owen (Law’20) I’ve learned to take myself a little less seriously. I thought that getting a C, failing a test, saying the wrong thing in class, or not getting an internship (or three) would be the end of the world. But all of those things happened, and I’m better off because of them.”–Jolie Klefeker (TAM’20) Read More Published: May 7, 2020 The 2020 livestreamed commencement ceremony is Saturday, May 16. And don’t forget: You and your families are invited to return to campus in May 2021 to walk in the university commencement ceremony and attend special recognition events. Be part of the story by tagging #ForeverBuffs on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn! Visit the 2020 commencement site for additional resources.Below, read from just a few of the talented, motivated and innovative students who are graduating and starting on their next adventure. Congratulations, Buffs! Not only are you academically learning, you are also learning to be an adult! Take this time to develop life skills, appropriate and safe relationships, boundary setting, self-love, goals and developing hobbies like cooking or making art. Starting the transition and implementation of these life aspects and seeing them as a priority for a good quality of life is key to developing the whole beautiful person you are. In short, academics are important and so are you. You are a living breathing entity which needs to be treated well by yourself and others in the world.”–Allison Murphy (Edu’20) Read More What does graduating from college or graduate school represent for you?  When I started classes at CU Boulder I had particular beliefs and ideas about teaching mathematics. Some of these beliefs and ideas were confirmed and strengthened, while others were challenged, which led to my own personal change and growth. I think when you pursue higher education it is because you want to change and grow, so I think it is important to allow yourself space to do so. In short: It’s OK to change your mind.”–Jami Riley (MEdu’20) Read More College is such a pivotal time in life, and you don’t know what you want to do. It’s so important to take advantage of as much as you can. Don’t be afraid to throw yourself into new situations and see where you fit.–Nate Bennett (TAM’20) Read More The School of Education at CU Boulder has taught me so many things that I will carry with me into the next chapter of my life. First and foremost, this program solidified my passion for working with students and the power that an inclusive space holds for all students K-12 and beyond. The SOE taught me to employ a true equity-mindset. There are people who are advantaged and people who are disadvantaged, and working in higher education, I will do everything I can to provide inclusivity and opportunity for confidence and success to all students, especially the ones who may need support most.”–Casey Knosby (MEdu’20) Read More Categories:Students in FocusCampus Community [Graduate students should] get to know the resources of the university to provide support and connection. From Norlin Library to the many stellar centers of research, CU provides a diversity of resources to support research and teaching while ensuring that you have the tools to overcome challenges, such as CAPS and Disability Services. CU also gives graduate students professional support through the graduate school, office of outreach and engagement, and the graduate teacher program as well as bringing in top scholars across fields to expose students and faculty to larger conversations. I have engaged with so many scholars doing cutting edge research and been inspired to push my own work further through engagement with so much of what the campus offers.”–Jennifer Shelby (PhDEnvSt’20) With my next chapter being that of a secondary teacher, I’ve been thinking a lot about how to bring the lessons that I have learned in graduate school into the classroom with students of my own. What comes to mind right now, is the question: “What counts as normal?” In my Queer(ing) Topics in Education class this last semester, my professor Bethy Leonardi always guided us to come back to that question. We often grappled with the idea of ‘normal’ and how the systems that are in place today often paint a picture of normal—but one that is far less complex, beautiful, or meaningful, than the reality of being human.I am excited to bring this question, and others, into my classroom as a way to allow my students to be agents of their own learning as capable young adults. I believe curiosity is essential to learning, and I am excited to center curiosity in my own classroom.”–Daniela Harton (MEdu’20) Read More Law school was the biggest gift I have ever given myself. It is a gift of the ability to make change. To fight. To stand up for my community. It is a gift of knowledge of understanding.Law school and the law itself also feels like coming home. It challenges me, it makes me angry, it makes me think, it empowers me.Over these last three years, I have spent thousands of hours reading, writing, and thinking. But most importantly, I have grown. I have made incredible friends and colleagues. I have spent hours and hours learning from professors, crying in their office hours, asking them to challenge me. I have argued with others and myself a lot.So, I want to thank Colorado Law for being a part of gifting myself, coming home and growing. I could not have done it without the community here.”–Amber Paoloemilio (Law’20) What is one of the greatest experiences or lessons from your time at CU that you’ll carry with you into your next chapter? The importance of creating a sense of community with classmates and/or friends. Creating a supportive network around you, especially within ENVD, becomes vital in its entirety and even more so during high-stress times like midterms and finals. We create positive competition between one another—learning, teaching and guiding each other.–Alyssa Drain (EnvDes’20) Read More I consider the level of intellectual engagement that the BUENO professors provided as the greatest experience while in the master’s program at CU. I loved how so many of my cultural beliefs that had been denied and dismissed both my K-12 and undergraduate careers were now affirmed and with academic grounding.”–Andrés Martínez (MEdu’20) Read More I’d say one of my top experiences in college, even though cheesy, was working at Norlin. It’s just an old building, until you get to know the people inside. Norlin Library has turned into a huge part of my life and I’ve made friendships and connections that I know will carry far beyond college. The memories and skills my jobs have given me are priceless. I’m lucky to have called Norlin my second home all four years of college.”–Lacey Porter (Engl’20) Find out who you are, what you like, and show up for the people around you!”–Hattie Jean Houser (Dance, Geog’20) Ah, a world of opportunity! I feel that more than anything else, graduating with my master’s represents a responsibility. A responsibility to myself and others to use my degree for all the potentials it holds in the realm of social justice. As a forever learner, I think graduating also represents the beginning of the next opportunity to learn, probably in a very different way than my past five years in higher ed.”–Meredith Nass (MEdu’20) Read More Graduating from college, for me, represents the transition from the learner to the teacher, from young adult to adult, and from the time to focus on learning for myself to the time to focus on applying my knowledge to help others. It represents a new phase in my life that comes with new responsibilities but also new opportunities to grow, to learn in a different way, and to reach the goals that I’ve been dreaming about since I was a child.”–Ally Collard (Edu’20) Read More I feel an overwhelming sense of privilege to have received a doctoral degree in education. I believe I have a choice for what I get to do now with this immense opportunity. I hope that I never take it for granted, and that my work only grows more consequential and justice-oriented as I move forward with my career.”–Erica Van Steenis (PhDEdu’20) Based on what you know now, what is your best piece of advice for other students? Graduating isn’t a finish line. It’s the end of your formal learning, but it’s the beginning of the ‘rest-of-your-life’ learning.”–Alex Fiel (TAM’20) Read Morelast_img read more

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Paras Healthcare to offer DNB courses for doctors

first_img WHO tri-regional policy dialogue seeks solutions to challenges facing international mobility of health professionals Related Posts Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals releases first “Comprehensive Textbook of COVID-19” Phoenix Business Consulting invests in telehealth platform Healpha News Read Article Share The DNB Courses at Paras Hospitals-Gurgaon includes DNB Anesthesia, DNB Neurosurgery, DNB Neurology and DNB RadiologyParas Healthcare will be providing specialised post graduate education – DNB Courses for medical education at post-graduate levels to doctors in their Gurgaon and Patna units. Each of these hospitals already have specialised centres in neurology, neurosurgery, orthopedics, trauma, critical care, emergency and radiology of national and international repute. The hospitals academic wings will additionally focus on providing post graduate medical education, fellowships, trainings to doctors, nurses and hospital managers on numerous fields related with medical sciences.Through the recommendations of the Medical Council of India, and based on the guidelines of DNB Courses, hospitals can today provide specialised courses to doctors and train them to be a part of the main stream medical fraternity. In fact working in a specialized care facility under the guidance and leadership of internationally renowned doctors provides them an edge.The DNB Courses at Paras Hospitals-Gurgaon will include DNB Anesthesia, DNB Neurosurgery, DNB Neurology and DNB Radiology. Paras HMRI Hospital-Patna will offer DNB Orthopaedics and DNB Internal Medicine.Speaking on the development, Dr Dharminder Nagar, MD, Paras Healthcare said, “We are very proud that we are today not only providing tertiary healthcare facilities and treatment solutions to metro and Tier III cities as well but have also forayed into providing a centre for higher education and knowledge to the future doctors of this country. The doctors who will avail the DNB courses here at Paras will benefit in multiple ways. They will not only gain education but also learn about administrative, operations and many other areas to get adequate exposure on all the aspects of how a tertiary hospital works. We are providing a holistic training and education.” center_img MaxiVision Eye Hospitals launches “Mucormycosis Early Detection Centre” Paras Healthcare to offer DNB courses for doctors The missing informal workers in India’s vaccine story Menopause to become the next game-changer in global femtech solutions industry by 2025 By EH News Bureau on March 27, 2018 Heartfulness group of organisations launches ‘Healthcare by Heartfulness’ COVID care applast_img read more

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Works Ministry to Introduce System to Streamline Road Cutting

first_imgRelatedBeaches To Be Improved For Public Access Story HighlightsThe Ministry of Transport, Works and Housing, will be introducing a Street Cutting Permit Application this fiscal year.This will ensure projects will not interfere with each other.The application will provide comprehensive, web-enabled permitting functionality and is seamlessly integrated with the city’s Geographic Information System (GIS). Photo: JIS PhotographerMinister of State in the Ministry of Transport, Works and Housing, Hon. Richard Azan, making his contribution to the 2014/15 Sectoral Debate in the House of Representatives on May 28. Advertisements RelatedTimeshare Concept To Be Added To Tourism Product The Ministry of Transport, Works and Housing, will be introducing a Street Cutting Permit Application this fiscal year, in a bid to improve stakeholder collaboration, while ensuring that projects do not interfere with each other.The application will provide comprehensive, web-enabled permitting functionality and is seamlessly integrated with the city’s Geographic Information System (GIS).This was disclosed by Minister of State in the Ministry of Transport, Works and Housing, Hon. Richard Azan, during his contribution to the 2014/15 Sectoral Debate in the House of Representatives on May 28.“With the Street Cutting Permit Application, utility companies such as the National Water Commission or private contractors need only a standard Mobile Web browser to access and view all street and permit activity online using maps created through our in-house database,” he said.He added that with this functionality, contractors and administrators can ensure that projects do not interfere with each other, “and that street cuts are undertaken in compliance with applicable guidelines.”The State Minister said it is expected that over time, “we will be able to use the application to develop insight into trends and patterns in street-cutting activities that may not have been readily apparent with the existing status quo.”center_img Works Ministry to Introduce System to Streamline Road CuttingJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay Works Ministry to Introduce System to Streamline Road Cutting ParliamentMay 30, 2014Written by: Chris Patterson RelatedJamaica Secures 2 Million Airlift Seats for Summer Season FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail last_img read more

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The Atheist Who Helped Shape Intelligent Design

first_imgJane Goodall Meets the God Hypothesis TagsAdolf GrünbaumadviceAndrew McDiarmidatheistsfriendshipgraduate studentsID the Futureintelligent designmentorsPaul Nelsonphilosophy of sciencepodcasttruth-seekingUniversity of PittsburghWilliam Blake,Trending Photo at the top: Adolf Grünbaum, a screenshot from “GrunbaumEngage,” a tribute by the Center for Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh. Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share Intelligent Design The Atheist Who Helped Shape Intelligent DesignDavid KlinghofferJune 22, 2020, 3:07 PM Share Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share “A Summary of the Evidence for Intelligent Design”: The Study Guide Origin of Life: Brian Miller Distills a Debate Between Dave Farina and James Tourcenter_img Nelson was an ex-art student turned philosophy undergraduate when he met Grünbaum. Paul cites William Blake and his saying that “Opposition is true friendship.” It wasn’t from directly absorbing Grünbaum’s perspective that Nelson became a prominent figure in the ID movement, but rather from their friendship and the creative sparks that came from it, inspiring a lifelong search for truth.  Congratulations to Science Magazine for an Honest Portrayal of Darwin’s Descent of Man It’s wonderful to remember mentors who helped shaped us, often in ways that might have surprised the influential person if he’d known about it beforehand. On a new episode of ID the Future, philosopher of science Paul Nelson talks with host Andrew McDiarmid about Dr. Nelson’s own mentor, atheist philosopher Adolf Grünbaum (1923-2018) at the University of Pittsburgh.  Requesting a (Partial) Retraction from Darrel Falk and BioLogos Nelson discusses the difference between truth-seeking and point-scoring as different approaches in navigating scientific and other controversies. It’s important advice. Download the podcast or listen to it here. Recommended A Physician Describes How Behe Changed His MindLife’s Origin — A “Mystery” Made AccessibleCodes Are Not Products of PhysicsIxnay on the Ambriancay PlosionexhayDesign Triangulation: My Thanksgiving Gift to Alllast_img read more

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Fatal Barnesmore crash inquest hears how 83-year-old Dunkineely man died instantly

first_img News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th By admin – July 7, 2015 Twitter A fatal head-on collision between two cars on the N15 at Barnesmore was described at an inquest today.83-year-old George McCallig died instantly in the head on collision in August last year.Coroner Dr Diarmuid Hegarty heard how 83-year-old George McCallig died instantly when his car veered across the road and collided with one driven by Catherine Hegarty.Mr McCallig was a former fisherman and farmer and a staunch supporter of local GAA Club Naomh Ultan.The Donegal town inquest heard that Ms Hegarty, who was driving from her Killybegs home to Letterkenny, had just stopped when she saw the other vehicle veering across and there was a head-on collision.She spent several weeks in hospital with her injuries.Eye-witness, nurse Liz Gallagher, told the inquest in a statement that there was no pulse from Mr McCallig when she examined him while he was slumped forward.The coroner noted that Mr McCallig, of Main Street, Dunkineely, was driving home from an appointment at Letterkenny Hospital.Medical evidence didn’t indicate a stroke or a heart attack prior to the crash five kilometres north of Donegal town last August 6th.Dr Hegarty said: “The poor man seemed to have lost control of the car. We don’t know why. We will never know.”The jury returned a verdict that death was due to medical injuries as a result of a car accident. Google+ Google+ Pinterest Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Twitter DL Debate – 24/05/21 WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty Harps come back to win in Waterford Pinterest Facebook Facebook Homepage BannerNews Previous articleWest Tyrone MLA Barry McElduff receives death threatsNext articleTwo men receive knife wounds in Derry assault admin WhatsApp Fatal Barnesmore crash inquest hears how 83-year-old Dunkineely man died instantly Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population growslast_img read more

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Blizzard: “We’re crafting stories for a global audience so our team needs to reflect that”

first_imgBlizzard: “We’re crafting stories for a global audience so our team needs to reflect that”Director of story George Kristic on the Overwatch team’s story dojos, lack of yes men, and why he wants more games with animated seriesJames BatchelorEditor-in-ChiefWednesday 17th April 2019Share this article Recommend Tweet ShareCompanies in this articleBlizzardFrom its very announcement, Overwatch has positioned itself as a beacon of diversity in a games market dominated by the usual grizzled white male power fantasy protagonists.Blizzard has certainly put effort into delivering on this, with a broad range of heroes to play and backstories that reveal they belong to demographics rarely covered by games. There is still room for improvement, of course — last year, there was disappointment when new character Ashe was not a black woman as fans had hoped — but it’s clear the ethos of Overwatch was not an empty promise.Yet sadly, and somewhat predictably, there is resistance in some corners of the fanbase. There was grumbling earlier this year when it was revealed that Soldier: 76 was gay, the second LGBTQ character in the game after Tracer.”Our story rooms are our dojos. These are our sacred places… We try not to let the negativity enter the dojo” During a keynote at last week’s Reboot Develop conference, Blizzard’s director of story George Krstic was asked if the negativity — whether it’s directed at an Overwatch character, a World of Warcraft expansion, or another project — ever directly influences a story the developers are trying to tell.”It varies game by game and project by project,” he said. “Specifically with WoW, our creative director Alex [Afrasiabi] said a wonderful thing, he said our story rooms are our dojos. These are our sacred places and we try to tell the stories as best we can and make our players as happy as we can. But we try not to let the negativity enter the dojo. You clear your mind, focus your mind, do good work.”Do we listen to our players and our fans? Absolutely. But we also try not to let that distract us from our end goal of the expansion or the new patch and so on. We have a plan. We are listening but also those voices can get pretty loud.”Krstic went on to stress how important diversity is to the Blizzard team, particularly on Overwatch, and said this even informs the formation of the team.”That definitely began before I started, and Overwatch is one of the physical manifestations of that. I remember Jeff Kaplan [Overwatch director] during one of his interviews — this was before I joined the company — was saying that his hope was everyone can see something within Overwatch that resonates with them, whether it’s a story, a character or a backstory. I thought that was awesome, that really made me excited to be part of the company. Soldier: 76’s homosexuality was met with complaints from some Overwatch fans, but Kristic says this never influences the story his team wants to tell”Internally, as storytellers, we’re now crafting stories for a global audience and our team needs to reflect that. We have people with various backgrounds, various POVs, and I really love that in our rooms it’s not all one voice. We’re not all one people. I found that sometimes that can be challenging when you’re trying to land a story, but it also makes the story that much better. We don’t have yes men or yes women in our story rooms — it’s more like, ‘No, can we make it better?’ or ‘No, I need to challenge that.’ It definitely keeps us on our toes, but it makes the story that much better.””We don’t have yes men or yes women in our story rooms – it’s more like, ‘No, can we make it better?’ It definitely keeps us on our toes, but it makes the story that much better” He also noted that Blizzard has seen a rise in the number of women both playing and making its games. Krstic admits he doesn’t know whether these women were already out there playing multiplayer shooters but not speaking out about it, or whether Overwatch has genuinely created a new audience, but he would be “intrigued to find out.””I do know that when we’ve spoken to our female players, some of them interact in different ways with our IP,” he said. “Some fans will just watch the animated shorts and read the comics. Some of them just play the game. I’m happy to see we’ve reached new and different audiences in new and different ways. We’re going to continue to try to do that.”Earlier in the session, Krstic said that one of the reasons he came to Blizzard was because it was making these animated shorts and other ancillary material around Overwatch that “speaks to character motivation and backstory, things you cannot usually [deliver] in a first-person shooter.”He said: “In many ways, Blizzard was taking new chances and risks… where they did not damage the gameplay but they found a way to still convey story to players — and the two seemed to work pretty well. That’s something we’re continually trying to do, and one of our pillars is ‘gameplay first’. If the game isn’t fun, there’s no point building worlds or stories around it. We’ve found this wonderful balance where we get to work with the game team where they bring game mechanics to us and we bring story to them so the two are pretty complementary, working hand in hand.”Blizzard has expanded the world of Overwatch and its characters through animated shorts and comics, and is ‘evolving’ its plans for moreKrstic said Blizzard’s transmedia plans are “evolving” although wasn’t able to give specifics on this. He did say his own team is working a lot on comics, novels, more animated shorts and even audio dramas, and the potential to tell stories outside of games is something Blizzard continues to explore. A Warcraft novel published a few months ago, for example, appeared in the New York Times bestseller list, and the publisher is keen to build on this success.Related JobsSenior Game Designer – UE4 – AAA United Kingdom Amiqus GamesProgrammer – REMOTE – work with industry veterans! North West Amiqus GamesJunior Video Editor – GLOBAL publisher United Kingdom Amiqus GamesDiscover more jobs in games During a Q&A at the end of the keynote, a member of the audience asked Krstic for his thoughts on other games-based animated series — particularly the crowdfunded animated special of Critical Role, a series of livestreamed tabletop gaming sessions between several voice actors, that is now in development.”I want animated series for all games, for games that I love, that you love, for games that I work on and have previously worked on,” said Krstic. “I think I speak for many players when I say that we want to interact with these games in different ways. Wouldn’t it be great if you can play a game, then jump on Netflix and binge and entire series based on it? “I think we’re moving in that direction, and I think [Critical Role] was a grassroots way of doing that. The industry has woken up, the Eye of Sauron is upon them, and I think a lot of people will be watching what they do with Critical Role. I think this is the beginning of many animated series coming your way, for better or worse. It’s already started on Netflix, we had Castlevania and there’s a few other series in development. It’s an exciting time for animation in games and inspired by games.”GamesIndustry.biz is a media partner of Reboot Develop and attended the conference with the assistance of the organisers.Celebrating employer excellence in the video games industry8th July 2021Submit your company Sign up for The Daily Update and get the best of GamesIndustry.biz in your inbox. Enter your email addressMore storiesBlizzard moves to block Fox’s Diablo trademarkThe TV network applied to register Diablo as a trademark for use on glassware, dinnerware and pet food in relation to its animated series HouseBrokenBy Marie Dealessandri 8 days agoJeff Kaplan leaves BlizzardOverwatch game director and 19-year veteran of the studio steps down; Aaron Keller to take over roleBy Brendan Sinclair 21 days agoLatest comments Sign in to contributeEmail addressPasswordSign in Need an account? Register now.last_img read more

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