Category: tiwmdhui

Scientists study steelhead for salmon’s secrets

first_imgEnvironment | Fisheries | Oceans | Science & Tech | SouthwestScientists study steelhead for salmon’s secretsMay 23, 2016 by Molly Dischner, KDLG Public Radio Share:Researchers used steelhead, like the one pictured, to see whether group size affected fish’s ability to choose the right stream to swim home in. (Photo courtesy Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)Each summer, millions of fish return to Bristol Bay and then swim on to the stream where they were born to spawn, and die. Exactly what compels them to return to the right spot is unknown, but scientists think that some hatchery-raised steelhead in Oregon might hold a clue.Peter Westley, an assistant professor at the University of Alaska Fairbanks School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, and colleague Andrew Berdahl, from the Santa Fe Institute, are trying to figure out why salmon choose to swim up a given stream.“(Some 50 million) fish last season migrated into Bristol Bay in the course of just a couple of weeks, and that’s a classic thing is that the fish all come at the same time, and it’s kind of curious to think, is there a potential social role in that?” Westley asked. “They all come as a major wave, and is it because they are in these groups and they are sort of following the leader and using social dynamics to aid their migrations.”To try and parse that out, the researchers have been digging fake streams at an Oregon lab for steelhead to swim in.“We actually tested this idea by giving steelhead that had migrated home to a hatchery, we brought them to the Oregon Hatchery Research Center and gave them a choice between water that smelled more like home, or all of the foreign water that came from the stream where the hatchery research center was based,” he said. “One of the things we showed with this steelhead system that indeed, fish that are moving upstream and are moving around are very social. They don’t move independently. They’re in groups moving around.”Westley said steelhead are a good proxy for salmon because they’re pretty similar fish in terms of life history and a predictable return to their birthplace.“They are a good model for these migratory sea-going fish that come back home,” he said. “They have subtle differences in life history but in terms of the social aspects and the migration and the orientation, I think they are a good model.”Right now, the research is relatively small, and Westley said there are many details to work out and enhance in future experiments: this is really just a tantalizing teaser of some possible results. But it’s a little step closer to figuring out what compels salmon to come home each year.Westley and Berdahl have been interested in this social side of fish behavior for some time, and their collaboration started with a paper that just looked at existing literature and data.“(The paper) poses this idea of a collective social role of salmon as they are migrating home, such that salmon or other migratory fish can school together, and by being in groups, they can share information and pool their abilities to navigate and orient and by doing so the group is much more likely to get home than if the group was smaller or the individual is traveling by itself and the onus of getting to the right spot would all be on the individual,” Westley explained.The idea behind the study is that salmon may smell their way to the right stream.“So you can imagine, fish that are headed to the Kvichak versus the Nushagak, if it’s better to be with your Nushagak group, how do you know that you’re with the right group? Salmon have an amazing ability to use pheromones and essentially of course they’re smelling their way home once they’re in freshwater,” he said.The role of scent is another thing the team would like to test. Westley said they’d like to repeat the experiment with a stronger scent of home-streams.There are other changes the team is looking at in the future, too – like trying larger groups of fish, and adjusting the timing to tie-in more closely to when salmon are actually on the move.Somewhere on the list, Westley said he’d also like to look at how wild fish fare, rather than just using hatchery steelhead – a choice made, so far, to keep things simple. And, he said, using hatchery fish can look at another interesting question: how hatchery fish impact wild fish when the two are mixing in places where they co-exist, like Alaska.Westley said the issue of straying, or hatchery fish that go home to the wrong place, could result from those fish just following wild fish to spawning grounds.“The challenge is always trying to scale from what you’re doing at sort of an experimental level up into the complexity of nature, and trying to assess what you’ve done at this small controlled scale, does it relate to nature as a whole,” he said. “It’s always a challenge.”Share this story:last_img read more

Read More »

Policy hawks stand ground despite sinking inflation

first_img whatsapp Tags: UK inflation whatsapp Read This NextRicky Schroder Calls Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl ‘Ignorant Punk’ forThe Wrap’Drake & Josh’ Star Drake Bell Arrested in Ohio on Attempted ChildThe WrapCNN’s Brian Stelter Draws Criticism for Asking Jen Psaki: ‘What Does theThe WrapDid Donald Trump Wear His Pants Backwards? Kriss Kross Memes Have AlreadyThe WrapHarvey Weinstein to Be Extradited to California to Face Sexual AssaultThe Wrap’The View’: Meghan McCain Calls VP Kamala Harris a ‘Moron’ for BorderThe WrapPink Floyd’s Roger Waters Denies Zuckerberg’s Request to Use Song in Ad:The WrapKatt Williams Explains Why He Believes There ‘Is No Cancel Culture’ inThe Wrap’Black Widow’ First Reactions: ‘This Is Like the MCU’s Bond Movie’The Wrap Show Comments ▼ Tuesday 13 January 2015 9:22 pm Express KCS A drop in the inflation rate to 0.5 per cent has not been enough to reverse the positions of monetary policy hawks – economists favouring a hike in interest rates. “We think the economy is growing strongly enough to take a normalisation of monetary policy and we’re sticking by that,” James Sproule, chief economist at the Institute of Directors told City A.M. “We’re only talking about moving to 0.75 per cent over the course of the year. The longer that rates remain at these very low rates, the bigger danger there is that people and businesses build it into their expectations and forecasts.”Former policy maker Andrew Sentance agreed.“The Bank is supposed to look two-three years ahead and it’s not clear that the danger for the medium-term inflation outlook has gone away,” Sentance told City A.M.“There is still a strategic challenge to gradually raise rates over time.” Simon Ward, chief economist at Henderson Investors maintains his view that domestic inflationary pressure is strong but that prices are being kept down by falling oil prices and the lagged effect of a strong pound which may soon reverse. Core inflation – which excludes energy – rose to 1.3 per cent in December. Meanwhile, current prices are still being impacted by the pounds rising exchange rate in early 2014 which has since stabilised. Share Policy hawks stand ground despite sinking inflation last_img read more

Read More »

Why do we call it that? Backstories of seven disease names

first_img 6. InfluenzaInfluenza simply means “influence” in Italian. The Latin root, “influentia” literally means “to flow into,” and it comes from way, way, way back in the day when medieval folks thought that humans could fall under the influence of liquid flowing off of stars. Science eventually let the world know that, actually, getting sick with the flu results from being under the influence of any one of a class of viruses.7. SyphilisIn 14th-century Europe, at a time of constant war, each country tended to blame its enemies for contagious diseases and to name contagious diseases for its enemies. So, what eventually came to be called syphilis was known as “the Neapolitan disease” among the French and “the French disease” among Italians. Russians called it “the Polish disease” and the Polish called it “the German disease.”This name game came to an end after Girolamo Fracastoro, an Italian doctor and poet, published a story poem about the disease in 1530. Fracastoro’s main character, who had contracted disease, was named Syphilus. But while we have cleared up what to call it, and science has determined that the bacterium Treponema pallidum causes it, we still aren’t quite sure where syphilis came from. By Leah Samuel Oct. 24, 2017 Reprints Newsletters Sign up for Daily Recap A roundup of STAT’s top stories of the day. Tags infectious diseaselists 7 of the most gruesome medical devices in history Related: Privacy Policy 2. NorovirusIn 1968, 150 students at Bronson Elementary School in Norwalk, Ohio, became very sick with vomiting and diarrhea. It took researchers four years and many stool samples to determine that the culprit was what at the time was called, alternately, “winter sickness,” “winter vomiting bug,” or stomach flu. Once investigators isolated and identified the virus that caused the outbreak of Norwalk, the city’s name became the virus’s name. As similar viruses sickened others in subsequent years, doctors began using the norovirus as an umbrella term for the Norwalk virus and its cousins.To this day norovirus is a regular cause of school outbreaks, including one earlier this year in Northern California’s Yolo County.3. CholeraHumoral theory was the driving model of medicine for centuries, from around the 3rd century B.C. to the late 1800s. The theory held that the body contained four main substances, called humors. They were blood, bile, black bile, and phlegm. An overabundance of any one of them threw the body out of balance, the theory went. So, based on that thinking, any condition that caused you to shed one or more humors was simply helping the body get back into balance. Derived from cholē, the Greek word for bile, cholera was originally an umbrella term for any one of several viral or bacterial infections that led to vomiting and diarrhea, which was simply a messy but efficient way to cast off bile, according to humoral theory. Related:center_img HealthWhy do we call it that? Backstories of seven disease names Please enter a valid email address. 1. ListeriaAfter E. G. D. Murray first isolated Bacterium monocytogenes in 1924, he proposed naming it Lister after a British surgeon who had died a dozen years earlier. Other scientists had already given the name Lister to a type of slime mold. So, Murray ultimately settled on the name Listeria for the rod-shaped bacteria passed along through contaminated food.The scientific and medical communities considered it an honor to for an individual to have a potentially deadly microbe named after him or her. But Joseph Lister’s posthumous popularity stood in stark contrast to the way he was shunned during his career. While working at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Lister noticed that half the amputation patients on his ward died of  “hospital disease” (now called operational sepsis)  between 1861 and 1865. Lister theorized that germs cause disease and infections, and experimented with different ways of preventing or destroying germs in the operating room. He came up with steps like hand-washing and using an antiseptic to clean instruments. By 1869, surgical mortality on his ward fell to 15 percent, then went down to zero by 1875. After Lister presented his findings in 1877, the medical establishment in the U.S. and Europe slowly began the practice of using sterilized instruments and gloves in operating rooms. But it’s unclear how much of vindication Lister experienced, as he was blind, deaf, and sickly by then, and died in 1912.advertisement 5 haunted hospitals to get you in the Halloween spirit Hulton Archive/Getty Images Diseases get their names from a variety of sources — from Latin or Greek root words, from place names, from the clinician who discovered them, or a well-known patient who had them.But we throw disease names around so commonly these days that many of the decades- or centuries-old origins are long forgotten or overshadowed by their modern meaning.Here are seven diseases with interesting stories behind their names. Have your own curious medical etymology? Leave it in the comments!advertisement Leave this field empty if you’re human: 4. Legionnaires’ diseaseIn 1976, members of the American Legion were celebrating the bicentennial of the country’s founding at their annual convention at the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel in Philadelphia. Soon after the proceedings began, attendees started becoming violently ill with chest pains, confusion, vomiting, and diarrhea. Most alarmingly, other legionnaires didn’t start showing symptoms until they had gone home. This led to worries that the “Philly sickness,” as some initially called it, would spread beyond Philadelphia. In total, 182 legionnaires became ill, and 29 died.Months later, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention investigators managed to isolate the cause of the illness: a new type of bacteria they called the “Legionnaire lung loving” bacteria, or Legionella pneumophila. Researchers found out that it had multiplied in the hotel’s water cooling tower. The tower kept the hotel’s rooms cool by allowing air to pass through the water inside it. Then it sent the unwanted heat out of the top of the tower as a fine mist of steam — and Legionella — that rained down onto the hotel guests gathered in a leisure area outside the hotel.5. DengueMedical historians cite a 3rd-century B.C. Chinese medical encyclopedia as the first reported reference to the fever, headache, and rash known as dengue. Dengue is a Spanish-language shortening of a Swahili term for a sudden, cramp-like seizure caused by an evil spirit. But by the time knowledge of dengue got to that Qin dynasty medical book, the Chinese were calling the illness “water poison,” and figured out that flying insects had something to do with it. Today, we know that dengue is indeed passed by infected mosquitoes, which tend to occupy areas with large amounts of standing water.last_img read more

Read More »

Medicaid beneficiaries sue Texas health agency for restricting access to hepatitis C medicines

first_imgPharmalot Ed Silverman GET STARTED Log In | Learn More Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. A group of Medicaid enrollees is accusing a Texas agency of rationing hepatitis C medicines due to cost, the latest such allegation in an ongoing battle between state officials and patients over access to the life-saving treatments.In a lawsuit, the Medicaid beneficiaries allege the Texas Health & Human Services Commission restricts coverage of hepatitis C medicines to only those enrollees with severe liver damage, even though the drugs have cure rates approaching 100% for all infected people. As a result, they must wait until they have advanced liver disease or cirrhosis of the liver before being eligible for coverage. Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. APStock By Ed Silverman Aug. 14, 2020 Reprints What’s included?center_img Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the pharma industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED [email protected] About the Author Reprints Medicaid beneficiaries sue Texas health agency for restricting access to hepatitis C medicines What is it? @Pharmalot STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Tags drug pricinglegalSTAT+last_img read more

Read More »

Charlotte County duo caught with drugs while driving car with no windshield

first_imgAdvertisementTags: Charlotte County Sheriff’s Officedrugstraffic stop AdvertisementCCSO said a K-9 deputy alerted to drugs in the car, and deputies did find a glass smoking pipe with white residue and a small pink pouch with a trace amount of cocaine. Carmello also admitted to hiding more items in her groin area, and she removed two glass pipes and a small glass container, which had crack cocaine and methamphetamine. Deputies said Carmello was arrested on two counts of possession of a controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia. She was also issued a warning for the traffic violation. Estremera was for having drug paraphernalia and it was later determined he was out on bond for fleeing to elude from a previous incident. DeSoto County woman gets 8 years in prison for dealing drugs June 16, 2021 Advertisement CHARLOTTE COUNTY, Fla. – Two people were arrested on drug-related charges while driving a car with a missing windshield in Charlotte County. Tiffany Carmello and Anel Estremera were driving a red SUV on May 8 when they ran a stop sign, according to the Charlotte County Sheriff’s Office. A deputy tried to conduct a traffic stop, but Carmello, the driver, continued and made several unusual movements before pulling over. The Charlotte County deputy said he noticed the front windshield was completely missing, and Carmello was acting nervous and fidgety. Several knives were also within reach of both the driver and Estremera, the passenger. When the deputy asked both of them to get out of the SUV, Carmello adjusted something on her waist, and the deputy also noticed some items associated with smoking crack cocaine. Punta Gorda man gets 16 years in prison for selling drugs June 14, 2021 AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 commentscenter_img RELATEDTOPICS AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments Advertisement Meth production surged in Asia during COVID-19 pandemic, report says June 11, 2021 Englewood mother joins teenage son behind bars for involvement in accidental shooting June 16, 2021last_img read more

Read More »

North Korea facing widespread farming problems

first_img North Korea facing widespread farming problems RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Scene from last year's corn harvest in North KoreaScene from last year’s corn harvest in North Korea. Image: Daily NK file photoFarming season reaches its peak in North Korea in May, but the chronic lack of farmers, agricultural materials and equipment, along with droughts, is continuing to plague the country. May is an important time in the country’s agricultural cycle and such issues are causing many North Koreans to express concerns about this year’s harvest.“There were many areas that didn’t receive enough snow in the winter, so a lot of the land is dry and dust storms are common,” a South Hamgyong Province-based source told Daily NK “We need rain to get rid of the drought, but people are worried [that it won’t happen].”North Korea is facing serious droughts across the country. Rodong Sinmun, the Workers’ Party of Korea’s mouthpiece, published an article on its front page entitled “Let’s Establish Measures to Thoroughly Protect Against Drought Damage.”“Our country is now facing severe droughts,” the article reads. “A lot of wheat and barley leaves farms in some provinces, cities and counties received little rain in April and are now suffering from drought, and even corn is starting to dry up.”The article goes on to say that “there is nothing more important than protecting the country’s agriculture from drought as part of efforts to protect the main frontline of the socialist economic construction, the agricultural frontline,” and goes on to call on  “everyone to actively participate in establishing thorough measures to protect against drought.”North Korean citizens are expressing deep concerns about the lack of agricultural equipment as they face these harsh environmental conditions.“Some inminban (neighborhood watch units) have 30-40 pesticide sprayers, but now all of them are old and can no longer be used. They are fixing some of them but there’s limits to what can be done. These inminbans just have a few working sprayers left,” the source said, explaining that farmers “have to spray huge fields with pesticides but because there’s so few working sprayers, the farmers are having a really tough time.”“Farmers also have to feed their cows, but the cows are all thin and malnourished so they’re useless,” he added. “Farmers need to use cows or tractors to plow the fields, but both cows and tractors are scarce. Adult farmers are having to head to the fields and plow them with shovels. Many farms are just relying on people to plow the fields rather than cows.”Cows are an important resource for farming in North Korea, but they have become a scarce resource. Bribes are frequently exchanged among farmers during the farming season to use available cows first.A source in Ryanggang Province said that collective farms “provide one work unit with a single cow and farmers use that cow in a particular order. Farmers can give bribes to the person managing the cows to go higher up the list, or use the cow to plow their own individual plots of land during the night.”“Cows have to rest if they work all day and night. People without any money to pay bribes can’t use the cows to plow their fields at the right time. This means they have to abandon the year’s harvest,” the Ryanggang Province-based source continued. “Many farmers use small plowshares (the cutting or leading edge of a moldboard) so that they can plow the fields themselves instead of cows.”North Korean farmers also face shortages of herbicides and other agricultural materials. Farmers with money can buy these materials, but there are increasingly farmers who cannot.“Farmers use herbicides because all they have to do is spray it on their fields once. Without herbicides, they would have to weed their fields two or three times,” said the source. “There are some farmers who buy herbicides because they can afford it, but many others have to weed their fields at least three times in the hot sun.”Farmers are supposed to receive farming equipment and agricultural materials from the government, but the government’s supply system collapsed many years ago. In the absence of government support, some cooperative farms obtain the required materials and equipment and provide them to their farmers.North Korean defectors say that traditionally, agricultural equipment repair centers have assisted cooperative farms by repairing broken pesticide sprayers and other equipment, but the centers have not been operating recently.“North Koreans have to worry about food all the time, but people are even more worried about the harvest this year because of the lack of equipment and the drought,”  separate South Hamgyong Province-based source told Daily NK.“People can cut down on the clothes they wear, but that’s not the case for food. Parents want to feed their kids corn, but they’re already feeling uneasy about the future.” Facebook Twitter NewsEconomy AvatarHa Yoon AhHa Yoon Ah is one of Daily NK’s full-time journalists. Please direct any questions about her articles to [email protected] Proposal to shift “general markets” to “specialized markets” finds little support among N. Korean leaders SHAREcenter_img US dollar and Chinese reminbi plummet against North Korean won once again News North Korea Market Price Update: June 8, 2021 (Rice and USD Exchange Rate Only) By Ha Yoon Ah – 2019.05.23 10:17pm News News last_img read more

Read More »

NASAA identifies top broker dealer compliance violations

James Langton Related news It reports that a total of 236 examinations conducted between January 1 and June 30, 2012, found 453 types of violations in five compliance areas. The greatest frequency of violations involved books and records (29%), followed by supervision (27%), and sales practices (24%). Registration & licensing (14%), and operations (6%) made up the rest. “The top five types of violations found involved: failure to follow written supervisory policies and procedures, suitability, correspondence/e-mail, maintenance of customer account information, and internal audits,” it says. Indeed, suitability issues comprised the majority of the sales practices violations, followed by outside business activity. Just a handful of the sales practices violations involved unauthorized trading, churning, and more serious offences such as fraud and misappropriation. In terms of recordkeeping, the most common problems were with maintaining new client account information, followed by issues with advertising and sales literature, and correspondence. Based on the exam results, NASAA recommended 10 best practices, which call on firms to do things such as: develop effective standards and criteria for determining suitability; ensure that staffing and expertise are commensurate with the size of the dealer and the type of business it does; develop a branch audit program; properly supervise private securities transactions and outside business activity; along with recommendations dealing with advertisements, correspondence, and complaint handling. Additionally, it said that dealers and financial professionals should develop best practices for handling accounts of ‘senior’ investors. “We highlighted types of violations to help broker-dealers strengthen their internal compliance programs. Our best practices are designed to help enable broker-dealers to address their compliance challenges and provide better client service,” said Jack Herstein, president of NASAA and assistant director of the Nebraska Department of Banking & Finance, Bureau of Securities. Poor recordkeeping, supervisory lapses, and sales practices infractions top the list of compliance violations uncovered in recent examinations of broker-dealers, the North American Securities Administrators Association (NASAA) reports. The group of regulators released a report at its annual conference today detailing the most common compliance violations exposed in coordinated examinations of U.S. broker-dealers, and setting out recommended best practices for firms to follow to improve their compliance. Regulators aim to root out pandemic-driven liquidity issues SEC examines rules for inter-fund trading Keywords ComplianceCompanies North American Securities Administrators Association Conflicts, crypto, cyber risk: the year ahead in compliance Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Share this article and your comments with peers on social media read more

Read More »

Liberals put changes to employee stock options on hold

first_imgthe canadian parliament and library during the fall michelloiselle/123RF U.S. businesses may have to report crypto assets to IRS Mark Burgess The federal government is delaying proposed changes to employee stock options that were planned to take effect on Jan. 1.A Department of Finance release on Thursday said the government is reviewing industry feedback on the proposal introduced in the March 2019 federal budget. Keywords Stock options,  Taxes,  Capital gains tax,  Federal election U.S. proposes tax of at least 15% on global corporate profits Government to reimburse self-employed workers who repaid CERB Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Related news Details on the measure, including a new coming-into-force date, will be announced in the 2020 budget. The delay will give individuals and businesses time to review and adjust to the new rules, the release said.Finance Minister Bill Morneau introduced draft legislation for the changes in June, and the Department of Finance consulted with industry on the proposals over the summer.“We will carefully consider the views of stakeholders as we move forward to ensure that Canada’s tax system is being used to support jobs and growth, rather than creating unfair tax advantages that disproportionately benefit the wealthy,” Morneau said in a statement.The draft legislation proposed a $200,000 annual limit for certain companies on employee stock option grants that can be taxed effectively at the capital gains rate. The limit will not apply to Canadian-controlled private corporations.The Finance Department says the changes are designed to ensure that smaller businesses can use stock options to attract talent as they grow and expand, while preventing executives at large companies from benefiting. Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

Read More »

Council to offer three-year-old kindergarten in 2022

first_imgCouncil to offer three-year-old kindergarten in 2022 From 2022, the City of Casey will be expanding its kindergarten service to offer a funded three-year-old kindergarten program in addition to the four-year-old program that is currently delivered.New Victorian Government policy requires three-year-old kindergarten to be made available to all eligible children from 2022, with research showing that two years of kindergarten leads to better long-term outcomes for children both academically and socially.Council will begin offering the minimum required five hours of three-year-old kindergarten per week for each eligible child next year in a number of our existing facilities.Additional staff will be employed to deliver the expanded service including teachers, assistants, team leaders and central enrolment staff.Chair of Administrators Noelene Duff PSM, said Council was pleased to be able to provide this valuable program to local families and was currently working through the necessary internal processes to scale-up the program.“With the rapid growth of the City of Casey and the significant number of young families moving to the area, Council recognises the immediate need to provide three-year-old kindergarten services,” Ms Duff said.“We are now in the process of upgrading our central enrolment system so that it can accommodate the additional intake of families and will be working with our kindergarten staff to determine what is needed to deliver this new program.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Casey City, children, City of Casey, council, Government, Government policy, local council, outcomes, research, Victorialast_img read more

Read More »

Faster biosecurity border clearance

first_imgFaster biosecurity border clearance Minister for Agriculture, Drought and Emergency Management, the Hon David Littleproud MPAssistant Minister to the Prime Minister and Cabinet, the Hon Ben Morton MPGovernment to trial scheme that aims to reduce red tape and biosecurity regulatory costs for importers and agricultural businessesRecognition of good industry business systems and compliance levels will allow department to concentrate on higher risk areasThis proposal aligns with findings of the Inspector-General of BiosecurityThe Australian Government is set to trial new industry arrangements that aim to reduce red tape and biosecurity regulatory costs for importers and agricultural businesses.Minister for Agriculture, Drought and Emergency Management David Littleproud and Assistant Minister to the Prime Minister and Cabinet Ben Morton said the trials were expected to start in July.“Biosecurity underpins access to markets and trade diversification efforts for our agricultural and food exporters,” Minister Littleproud said.“It helps our agricultural industries to avoid pest and disease costs faced by many overseas growers, boosting profits and protecting Australia’s reputation as a producer of clean and green goods.“Robust biosecurity controls also protect the environment, our way of life, and support job sustainability and growth in regional communities. “This proposal will involve the design and delivery of up to three pilots with highly compliant entities to test the ability to manage end to end biosecurity risks across importer supply chains.“This will reduce regulatory intervention and associated costs for these entities and other entities who invest heavily in commercial quality assurance systems and have a good track record of biosecurity compliance.”Assistant Minister Morton said the pilots will act as proof of concepts.“If successful, the pilots will lead to more permanent arrangements that will free up existing departmental biosecurity officer capacity to concentrate on areas of higher risk, compliance and business improvement,” Assistant Minister Morton said.“The pilots will also help to inform priorities for other co-regulation arrangements as recommended by the Inspector-General for Biosecurity.“This measure is part of the Government’s deregulation agenda and a key part of the Government’s plan to support economic recovery, by making it easier for businesses to invest and create jobs.“Modernising our regulatory practices will minimise the administrative burden on industry as biosecurity officers will not have to physically attend their sites, other than for verification and audit purposes.“This will save importers from having to delay movement of goods until the inspection is complete, the cost of which can reach up to $5 million per annum for some of our larger and more regular importers.”Fast Facts:Depending on participant capacity, the trials will run simultaneously or consecutively, with the first commencing 1 July 2021. All pilots will conclude by the end of 2021. Faster biosecurity clearance processes will benefit farmers and producers who require goods from overseas (eg. machinery parts, fertiliser) to operate or advance their business, particularly where those goods are in short supply within AustraliaAustralia’s biosecurity system also protects $42 billion in inbound tourism, $53 billion in agricultural exports and 1.6 million Australian jobs across the supply chain. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Agriculture, Australia, Australian, Australian Government, biosecurity, Emergency, Emergency Management, environment, Fast Facts, Government, industry, Minister, Prime Minister, red tape, supply chain, sustainabilitylast_img read more

Read More »

FashionBuzz © 2015 | All Rights Reserved Theme by Flythemes