Category: pmffnblw

Researchers ID part of the brain for processing speech

first_imgEmail Share on Facebook LinkedIn To address this question, the researchers conducted a series of experiments in which the study’s subjects listened to speech as well as to other types of “environmental” sounds that ranged from fireworks to ping pong to dogs barking.To ensure that the subjects were responding to speech sounds rather than to a language that was already familiar to them, the researchers used recorded German-language words–which none of the subjects understood–rather than English ones. In this way, the method aimed to solely measure the brain’s detection of speech, which involves listening and speaking, rather than language, which involves constructing and understanding sentences.To further disguise the origins of both the speech and environmental sounds, the researchers developed a series of audio “quilts”–sound segments, ranging from 30 to 900 milliseconds, in which words or natural sounds were chopped up and reordered. With this method, the researchers could help ensure that the study’s subjects were responding only to audio cues rather than guessing their origins–and thus possibly activating parts of the brain not relevant to sound detection.During these procedures, the researchers gauged subjects’ neurological responses–in multiple parts of the brain–using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).The results showed expected activity in response to all types of sounds in the temporal lobe’s auditory cortex. However, moving further down in this region–to the STS–the results showed activity only in detecting speech sounds, suggesting that this part of the brain is reserved for spotting the spoken word. Share on Twittercenter_img Share A team of New York University neuroscientists has identified a part of the brain exclusively devoted to processing speech. Its findings point to the superior temporal sulcus (STS), located in the temporal lobe, and help settle a long-standing debate about role-specific neurological functions.“We now know there is at least one part of the brain that specializes in the processing of speech and doesn’t have a role in handling other sounds,” explains David Poeppel, the paper’s senior author, a professor in NYU’s Department of Psychology and Center for Neural Science.The study, which appears in the journal Nature Neuroscience, sought to address a decades-old uncertainty–and dispute–in neural science: are there certain regions of the brain exclusively dedicated to managing speech, thereby ignoring other sounds, such as music or animal noises? Pinterestlast_img read more

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Man of their dreams

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North West hydrogen cluster could ‘boost regional economy by £1.6bn’

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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ET or not ET? That is the ­question

first_imgWhen an employment lawyer dies it must be tempting for those left behind to draw upon the career of the deceased when considering an inscription for the tombstone. Some may aspire to the simple phrase: ‘He lived as he died; scandalous, vexatious and with no reasonable prospect of success.’ For my part, I would wish any obituary to describe me not as having died but instead as having been ‘struck out’. But what will be the obituary of the employment tribunal system when it one day draws to a close (as we all must)? Alright, there is no proposal to actually disband the institution, but how radically can it really be changed before it is regarded as being a ­completely different entity? With the proposal to charge claimants a fee to issue/proceed with a claim, should we not be asking how much of the original ‘industrial tribunal’s’ DNA will then remain? On the face of it the change may not seem so radical. Tribunals already have the ability to make deposit orders (and I have even heard tell of striking out claims – though I suspect such stories to be apocryphal). At dinner parties around the land employment lawyers have probably suggested far more dramatic solutions to the problem of controlling the costs of spurious claims – my own favourites being the resolution of disputes by recourse to a game of Twister or even the ducking stool (if he does not die it is unfair dismissal) – though this may be relaxing the laws of evidence too far (and may make appeals even more unlikely to survive sifting). The concept of fees is not a change to the substantive ‘law’ itself, or even the rules of procedure for the actual conduct of claims. Many agree that something must be done to discourage foolish claims, so why the fuss? The problem is that however low the proposed fees (see below), we must acknowledge that the change represents a quantum leap in the very basis upon which claimants (usually unemployed ones) may now have access to the system – one that was designed to give access to quick and simple justice to the ordinary person. The system has never been without its problems. As far back as June 1978 the minister for employment (then Harold Walker), faced with criticism about the increase in claims and cost for the ‘industrial’ tribunals, told parliament that ‘[they] may not be perfect, but the tribunals were set up to provide a speedy, informal and inexpensive means of settling disputes. I am anxious, however, to stop them becoming more like law courts’. His proposed solution was quite different from that at hand. Far from suggesting charging fees to ‘applicants’, he noted ‘an increasing tendency for employers to engage lawyers to represent them. Not only does that put up the cost to the employer, it increases the legalism and often prolongs cases. I do not go along with those who want more lawyers in tribunals’. It is notable that he refers only to employers engaging lawyers. The phenomenon of employee reps had perhaps yet to hit the streets. Admittedly, the decision to introduce fees has not been made rashly, and for many years there has been genuine concern at society developing a taste for litigation and the perceived increase in people ‘trying it on’. These days there cannot be a pub in Britain in which a lay ‘expert’ on tribunal claims cannot be found. Like the M25, it is possible that the tribunal system has even become a victim of its own success. The cost to respondents (and more significantly the state) in dealing with those claims has soared and a barrier might well be required to stand between justice and claims that are not genuine or serious. But is the introduction of fees really consistent with the system? Also, would it not be nice if the ­tribunal made better use of the rules we already have? The odd striking-out order would be encouraging. There is of course debate about how fees will be imposed. The government issued its consultation on the level of fees and has come up with two different options (on which it has sought views). Under option one, fees would be charged at two stages: first on issue and then, for those claims proceeding to a hearing, before the hearing. Fee levels would depend on the type of claim, and where more than one claim is made on the ET1 form, the fee payable would be the one which relates to the highest level. Claims lodged without the correct fee would not be accepted. The indicative level of fees and the person initially responsible for paying (the claimant) would be in the region of £150-£250 as an issue fee and £250-£1,250 as a hearing fee. Option 2 is that fees would only be charged on issue. The level of fee would depend both on the type of claim made and on the level of compensation sought – all claimants would have to state whether they are seeking an award in excess of £30,000 and, if seeking an award below £30,000, the tribunal would be precluded from awarding more. The indicative level of fees and the person initially responsible for paying (again, the claimant) would be between £200 and £600 (for claims of varying complexity of up to just under £30k) and £1,750 (for claims of £30k and over). Under both options tribunals would have the power to order the unsuccessful party to reimburse fees paid by the successful party, and admittedly the HM Courts & Tribunals Service remission system would be available for those who cannot afford the fee. There would however be no refunds. The government has said that if option one is decided upon, the fees would be introduced in 2013, but if option two were adopted the changes would not be made until 2014. The consultation closed on 6 March. No doubt there will be rejoicing in some quarters that something is being done to make claimants think twice before investing in proceedings, but given that the very foundation of the system was to afford ‘free’ and accessible justice to workers, are we creating a completely different ­system in doing so? Rather than the tribunal system of the 1970s, are we on the verge of creating ‘county court-lite’? There is of course another possibility. Just as the human body is completely ‘renewed’ and therefore different every 15 years (with all the younger cells being replaced by new, slightly ‘older’ versions), perhaps the tribunal system must shed its skin every so often. It is hard now to imagine that in 1986 the maximum compensatory award was £8,000 (as context, the maximum amount of compensation that could be paid tax-free was still £30,000). It is harder still to contemplate that the qualifying period for unfair dismissal, having been six months, two years (one year for small employers), two years for all employers and then one year, could now be moving back to two years (though with a present indication this would apply only for employees whose commencement date was on or after 6 April 2012). Some might say that the tribunal system must adapt to meet the times in which we live, whether or not such flexibility may take us away from the raison d’être of the system. For my part, I shall brush up optimistically on my Twister in case things ever move in that direction and look for happier times to come. In the interim, perhaps that announcement will simply have to read: ‘The employment tribunal is dead. Long live the employment tribunals.’ Darren Clayton, Doyle Clayton Solicitorslast_img read more

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A phrase I wish I’d coined

first_imgSubscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

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Collett boils over

first_imgCollett’s project team handled the unloading of the cargo from a barge in Rotterdam, before transporting the boiler to its final destination in the UK.As well as transport, Collett also provided lifting services on site, utilising a 500-tonne capacity crane, mobile elevated work platforms, a rigger and a banksman to help install the boiler.The installation is expected to take two weeks to complete. Collett has also arranged to supply a 200-tonne capacity and 30-tonne capacity mobile crane for the duration of the project.  www.collett.co.ukwww.max-goll.delast_img read more

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Beaumont-Farmington Hills doc shares COVID-19 health tips

first_img Farmington Voice Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window) Dr. Matteo Valenti (Beaumont Health)Dr. Matteo Valenti has some very simple advice about taking care of yourself during the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.It’s time to get back to basics.Everyone should be focused on the practices recommended by the Centers for Disease Control: washing your hands with “good old soap and water”, coughing into the crook of your elbow, staying away from people who are sick, and avoiding large crowds – made much easier by Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s March 23 “Stay Home. Stay Safe.” Executive Order.But this is also a good time to protect your overall health.“My best advice about maintaining health is the same every day of the week,” said Valenti, an internal medicine/primary care physician with Beaumont-Farmington Hills. “People are healthy when they eat well, when they sleep well, and when they move.”Eating wellIf you aren’t already, get back to eating three solid meals a day, with a protein, fruits and vegetables, and make sure elders are doing the same.“It’s important for family members to make sure their loved ones have access to good foods,” Valenti said. ”A lot of older people do Boost or Ensure as a supplement, and that’s fine.”Sleeping wellAdditional stress and disrupted schedules can interfere with sleep, at a time when you most need it. “Are you doing the right things for sleep? Do you prepare for sleep? Have a sleep-wake cycle that’s consistent.”Valenti said taking melatonin or simple measures like drinking herbal teas, creating a calming routine with prayer, poetry, or music, can help with sleep and general anxiety.ExerciseWhen you’re feeling tired, Valenti said, try a little exercise.“I really do think your body likes to move. When you exert energy during the day, you sleep better at night. Doing something as simple as a walk around the neighborhood can help you feel better mentally.”Supplements and medicinesValenti said people have circulated “a lot of wrong information about supplements”, but his recommendation for anyone, and especially those 50 and older, is a daily multivitamin and, because we all live in Michigan, a Vitamin D supplement (2000 units). He said there’s really no need for super high doses of Vitamin C.“You should also make sure you’re taking care of other illness, like diabetes,” he said. “People still need their regular care and to focus on their regular medical problems.”Now would be a good time to quit smoking, Valenti said, and keep an eye on your alcohol consumption.“If it relaxes you to have a glass of wine, that’s fine, but not necessarily across the board,” he said, adding some people must avoid alcohol because of their medications. “I think there’s a problem if people are drinking every single day.”“I do think we will get through this,” Valenti added. “I think we get through it together. Focus on the simple things you can do to make small change, and ultimately, being supportive of each other.” Reported bylast_img read more

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Josh Gordon’s Not So Final Stand

first_img Jimmy Watkins Related TopicsBrownsJosh Gordon Josh Gordon’s reinstatement to the NFL Monday included a four game suspension making this Gordon’s fourth suspension in as many years since he was drafted in 2012. Gordon’s inability to pass drug tests will have caused him to miss 33 of a possible 74 career games by the time his most recent punishment is fulfilled. And he’s missed 27 of his last 32 possible games.Yet, the Browns will most likely end up keeping him. Gordon will make just over a million dollars this season. It was only three seasons ago that Josh Gordon led the league in receiving yards despite missing two games due to his first failed drug test. The Browns need playmakers, badly. Considering Gordon gets to workout, practice, and play in preseason games with the team during his newest suspension, he should be ready to produce his first game back in week five. It’s not a difficult decision for Cleveland to make.‘Ok, but this is his last chance, right?! There’s no way a team can pick this guy up again if he fails another test!’ Actually, this probably isn’t it for Gordon, and a team would probably pick him up again. Cheap talent is hard to find, and Gordon will be as far apart in dollars and talent as you’ll find in this league once he becomes a restricted free agent after this season.Another failed test won’t exile him from the league forever. It might force him into treatment, but as long as Gordon convinces teams that he can still the force he was in 2013, there will be a market for a star-wide receiver for close to the league minimum.That’s not to say this isn’t potentially his last dance in Cleveland. New Browns’ coach Hue Jackson is trying to implement a new culture where everyone works hard, earns their spot, etc. Slotting your pot-smoking star wideout back into the starting lineup whenever he periodically gets clean doesn’t exactly fit that image.But, the NFL can be the epitome of the old “One man’s trash is another man’s treasure” saying. Teams around the league convince themselves time after time that their organization can be the one to turn around a talented, troubled young man. ‘Talented’ being the operative word here (teams are shockingly less interested in troubled young men that can’t play).Gordon’s case is even stronger in that regard because, well, it’s been the Browns. Teams around the league know how dysfunctional Cleveland has been the last 15 years. The fact that Gordon’s issues took place under Cleveland’s watch might only reinforce the idea in other teams’ heads that an organizational change could be the difference.Josh Gordon does not have infinite lives. He does, however, have more lives than the average NFL player because of his immense talent. If he does not turn things around, he will be out of the NFL at some point. But, he also has not reached that threshold yet. Gordon’s talent alone will not be enough to keep him in the NFL forever, but it’ll do for the near future.last_img read more

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Local teen makes semis at Dallas Cowboys cheerleader tryouts

first_imgBy PETE BANDASpecial to the PRESSreporter@sbnewspaper.comOn most Sundays, you could probably find Marissa Nicole Maldonado and her family huddled around the television to watch the Dallas Cowboys play. But if Maldonado has it her way, the family will soon be watching Cowboy games for an entirely different reason.Maldonado, an 18-year-old San Benito High School senior, made a trip to AT&T Stadium this past weekend in an attempt to achieve her lifelong dream of becoming a Dallas Cowboys Cheerleader. The current Miss Texas Citrus Teen and multiple-time beauty pageant champion made it to the semi-finals before being cut, but says she promises to be back and believes being a Dallas Cowboys cheerleader is undoubtedly in her future.“I have my heart set on becoming a cheerleader for the Dallas Cowboys no matter what,” said Maldonado. “It’s been something I’ve wanted since I was a little girl. The cameramen would catch a glimpse of them during Cowboy games and I would always say that I would be there one day.”Want the whole story? Pick up a copy of the Port Isabel-South Padre Press, or subscribe to our E-Edition by clicking here. RelatedCare package campaign, Cowboys raffle nearing endBy MICHAEL RODRIGUEZ South Padre Parade paradeeditor@portisabelsouthpadre.com Eight more days remain for those in the American Military Support (AMS) campaign that calls for residents to help local troops stationed overseas and win a chance to see the Dallas Cowboys the process. As previously reported, AMS is a nonprofit organization specializing…December 8, 2011In “South Padre Parade”It’s Personal: Walk for Women attendees share how breast cancer has affected themBy PAMELA CODY Special to the PRESS They say it takes a village, but in this case, it takes an Island, to help those fighting breast cancer in the lower Rio Grande Valley. For 15 years now, a large contingent of dedicated volunteers on South Padre Island have worked tirelessly…October 12, 2018In “News”Church to hold two-day fall festivalBy MARTHA McCLAIN Special to the PRESS A two-day fall festival featuring family fun and games for the Laguna Madre area is scheduled Oct. 13-14 by Our Lady Star of the Sea Catholic Church in Port Isabel. Chalupa games with prizes, a country store, cake walks and children’s games will be…October 12, 2018In “News” Sharelast_img read more

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West Florida to Host Superhero Game

first_img Share Senior Charles Bouie West Florida to Host Superhero Gamecenter_img PENSACOLA, Fla. — The University of West Florida athletic department will host the UWF Superhero promotion game this Saturday, February 28th during the both the men and women’s basketball games against Valdosta State.  Fans are encourage to dress up like their favorite superhero characters for a chance to win great prizes.  Fans participating in the Argo Spirit Challenge will also have chances to earn points as well as enter in a halftime dance competition in this all important Gulf South Conference finale.This is the final game of the season for both the men and women’s basketball teams and will serve as the men’s Senior Night.  This is an all important game for UWF in Regards to the Gulf South Conference Tournament.  If our men’s team beats Valdosta this weekend, they would clinch a berth into the GSC Tournament.  If they lose, they can still reach the tournament if West Alabama loses their last game.  If West Alabama wins it would then it will go down to a tiebreakerOn the women’s side, we must win this weekend against Valdosta, as well as a few other things happening elsewhere.  Montevallo must defeat North Alabama, and West Georgia must defeat Alabama-Huntsville.  If those happen, and we win, we would get into the tournament on a tiebreaker.For more information on Argonaut athletics or to follow along with live stats, fans can keep up with the action at www.GoArgos.com.Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

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