Category: ryycewbn

News Scan for Aug 06, 2018

first_imgSaudi Arabian health ministry notes 30 new MERS casesAfter several months of silence, the Saudi Arabian Ministry of Health (MOH) recently uploaded information on 30 new MERS-CoV case detections on its website, including a cluster of 11 household cases from Najran detected in late May and early June.The 11 Najran MERS-CoV (Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus) cases were all in men. The most recent case involves a 41-year-old Saudi man in Dammam who was hospitalized for MERS on Aug 3. He is listed in stable condition, and the MOH said he had direct contact with camels.Nine cases were recorded in July, 8 in June, and 13 in May. All case-patients are listed in stable condition except 3, and the MOH notes two deceased patients, including a 68-year-old man from Arar city who acquired MERS in a hospital setting. The other death occurred in a 57-year-old man from Jeddah who had camel contact.At this time, the MOH is not providing the cumulative number of MERS cases since the virus was first detected in Saudi Arabia in 2012. MOH Epidemic Events webpage Northern Europe sees spike in echovirus infectionsA new report from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) said that Scandinavia-area nations and the United Kingdom reported a surge of cases of echovirus 30 (E30) in 2018.Based on surveillance data, 259 E30 cases from Denmark (38), Latvia (1), the Netherlands (85), Norway (37), Sweden (21) and the United Kingdom (England and Scotland; 77) have been reported since January. Twenty-two percent of cases have occurred in infants ages 0 to 3 months, and 38% in 26- to 45-year-olds.According to the ECDC, Denmark reported that 61% of its E30 detections were from cerebrospinal fluid specimens, which can signal a severe infection. In total, 149 out of 167 patients (89%) were reported with central nervous system symptoms from the Netherlands, Norway, and the United Kingdom.E30 is a non-polio enterovirus that causes aseptic meningitis outbreaks worldwide, usually in 5-to 6-year intervals, the ECDC said. E30 is usually transmitted in an oral-to-oral or oral-to-fecal route, but no transmission route has been clearly identified in these current outbreaks. Aug 3 ECDC report Possible variant flu cases reported in California with possible pig linkThe Public Health Department (PHD) of San Luis Obispo County in California is investigating several potentially variant flu cases to determine if they have any connection to a case of influenza in a pig at the California Mid-State Fair.Details are sparse, but the PHD said several people who had extended contact with pigs at the fair now have “tested positive for an influenza virus that may be different from viruses that commonly circulate among people during flu season.””At this time, the Public Health Department does not have any laboratory confirmation that the cases are linked to pigs.  In each of the laboratory-confirmed local cases of influenza being investigated, patients have recovered on their own within several days,” the department said on its website.Variant influenza cases often occur after swine contact at county fairs, but these are the first cases reported in California this year. According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there have been 435 variant flu cases in the United States since 2005. Most cases resulted in mild illness. Aug 3 San Luis Obispo PHD notice Jul 6 CDC report Malaysia, Vietnam report high-path H5 avian flu outbreaks in poultryMalaysia has reported a highly pathogenic H5N1 avian flu outbreak at a layer farm, its first in more than a year, and Vietnam reported three more H5N6 outbreaks, according to the latest notifications from the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE).In Malaysia, the outbreak location is a commercial layer farm in the state of Sabah, in the country’s eastern region on the island of Borneo. The farm reported high numbers of chicken deaths to state veterinary officials on Jul 27, and investigation and sampling took place on the same day. The virus killed 3,000 of 28,000 susceptible birds, and the survivors were culled as part of the response to the outbreak.The report said the outbreak was the first to hit Sabah state. Malaysia’s last H5N1 outbreak occurred in March 2017, which struck backyard poultry in Kelantan state on the northeast side of the peninsular part of the country.Meanwhile, Vietnam reported three more H5N6 outbreaks in two northern provinces, all involving village poultry. One was in Nghe An province and the others were in Hai Phong. The outbreaks began from Jul 28 to Jul 30, killing 1,590 of 12,620 birds. Officials culled the remaining birds, and other responses steps included vaccination and enhanced surveillance and disinfection.The country reported its last H5N6 outbreak in March of this year.Aug 6 OIE report on H5N1 in Malaysia Aug 3 OIE report on H5N6 in Vietnamlast_img read more

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Stewardship / Resistance Scan for Jul 30, 2020

first_imgTrial evaluates antibiotic combination for MRSA bacteremia, endocarditisA randomized phase 3 trial found that the combination of daptomycin and fosfomycin provided higher treatment success than daptomycin alone for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia and endocarditis, but the difference did not reach statistical significance, Spanish researchers reported yesterday in Clinical Infectious Diseases.The open-label superiority trial was conducted in 18 Spanish hospitals, with patients randomly assigned to receive either 10 milligrams (mg) of intravenous daptomycin per kilogram daily plus 2 grams of intravenous fosfomycin every 6 hours or 10 mg of daptomycin per kilogram daily. The primary endpoint was treatment success 6 weeks after the end of therapy. Secondary endpoints included microbiological failure, complicated bacteremia, and adverse events leading to treatment discontinuation.Of the 167 patients randomized, 155 completed the trial and were assessed for the primary endpoint. The results showed that treatment success was achieved in 40 of 74 patients (54.1%) who received daptomycin plus fosfomycin and 34 of 81 patients (42.0%) who received fosfomycin alone (relative risk, 1.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.93 to 1.8; P = 0.135). The final microbiologic evaluation found that daptomycin plus fosfomycin was associated with lower microbiologic failure than fosfomycin alone (0 vs 9 patients; P = 0.003) and lower complicated bacteremia (16.2% vs 32.1%; P = 0.022).Adverse events leading to treatment discontinuation occurred in 13 of 74 (17.6%) of patients treated with daptomycin plus fosfomycin, compared with 4 of 81 patients (4.9%) treated with daptomycin alone (P = 0.018). The most frequent serious events were cardiac failure (4 cases) and hypokalemia (2 cases).”In conclusion, daptomycin plus fosfomycin provided 12% higher rate of treatment success than daptomycin alone, but this difference did not reach statistical significance,” the authors wrote. “Our results suggest that this antibiotic combination could be more effective in younger patients and those with more severe disease.”Jul 29 Clin Infect Dis abstract COVID-19 study identifies phases of antibiotic prescribingAn analysis of patients admitted to a Spanish hospital for COVID-19 has identified two specific phases of antibiotic use, Spanish researchers reported today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology.The before-and-after cross-sectional study compared antibiotic prescribing data at the hospital from two periods: Jan 1 to Apr 30, 2019 (pre-COVID) and Jan 1 to Apr 30, 2020 (COVID). The COVID period saw more than 1,293 admissions for COVID-19 and 317% increase in critical care bed usage.The analysis found that antibiotic use was similar in January and February 2019 and 2020 but increased significantly in March and April 2020 compared with the pre-COVID period, rising from 73.3 defined daily doses (DDDs) per 100 patient-days in March 2019 to 87.8 DDDs/100 patient-days in March 2020 and from 69.8 DDDs/100 patient-days in April 2019 to 93.2 DDDs/100 patient-days in April 2020.The researchers also observed that during the first COVID-19 peak in March, use of amoxicillin/clavulanate trended upward rapidly, consistent with the hospital’s recommendations for empiric antibiotic prescribing in COVID-19 patients. But during the second peak, there was increased use of broader-spectrum antibiotics and reduced use of amoxicillin-clavulanate. This corresponded with increased admission to critical care for patients with severe illness, “probably corresponding with an increase in nosocomial infection,” the authors wrote.The authors said the findings suggest antimicrobial stewardship principles should be standardized to provide the safest antibiotic therapy for COVID-19—a recommendation that has also been made by the World Health Organization (WHO) to ensure that antibiotics aren’t being used inappropriately during the pandemic.”In conclusion, our data supports the WHO concern about inappropriate use of antibiotics during the pandemic, and the recent change in its guidelines discouraging empirical antibiotics in COVID-19,” they wrote. “Long-term studies are needed to assess the impact of the increase in antibiotic usage during COVID-19 pandemic on the hospital flora, and in turn, how this might affect future nosocomial infection and antimicrobial resistance trends worldwide.”Jul 30 Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol abstract New community-acquired pneumonia antibiotic approved in EuropeNabriva Therapeutics, of Dublin, announced this week that the European Commission has approved lefamulin for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) following a review by the European Medicines Agency (EMA).The approval of lefamulin, which is sold under the brand name Xenleta, was based on efficacy data from two phase 3 trials—LEAP 1 and LEAP 2—that found the antibiotic was non-inferior to standard-of-care moxifloxacin in the treatment of adults with CAP and was generally well-tolerated. The drug has a novel mechanism of action that company officials say has a low propensity for the development of resistance.”The marketing authorization of Xenleta provides an important step forward for patients with CAP, offering the first new antibiotic class approved by the EMA in decades,” Nabriva CEO Ted Schroeder said in a company press release. “We believe the approval of Xenleta is a significant improvement in the fight against antimicrobial resistance and we are excited to bring this critically needed medicine to patients throughout Europe.”Approximately 3 or 4 million cases of pneumonia occur in the European Union annually.Lefamulin was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of adult CAP patients in August 2019.Jul 28 Nabriva press releaselast_img read more

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New year brings old problems for high street

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Revenue growth drives Plug Power’s New York expansion

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Sparrows lands 5-year contract across Maersk Oil’s North Sea assets

first_imgSparrows Group has secured a five-year contract to deliver hydraulic, lifting and rigging services for Maersk Oil’s UK floating assets.The agreement will see Sparrows support the operator in strengthening its lifting operations for the Global Producer 3 (GP3) and Gryphon FPSO’s and the new Culzean FSO, Sparrows informed on Thursday. The value of the contract was not disclosed.The scope encompasses hydraulic services including maintenance, repair and parts and materials procurement; as well as the supply, management and certification of all lifting gear.Additional mechanical engineering services, including failure modes, effects and criticality analysis (FMECA) studies; finite element analysis; the design and build of structural and mechanical assemblies and small pressure vessels; reverse engineering and fabrication; and Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations (LOLER) inspections, are also included.Stewart Mitchell, chief executive officer of Sparrows, said: “We look forward to collaborating with Maersk to support their existing operations across the North Sea as well as Culzean. As the largest discovery  in the UKCS since 2004, we are delighted to be involved in helping ensure safe and efficient production from this strategically important development.”The Culzean gas condensate field has resources estimated at 250-300 million barrels of oil equivalent. Located in the Central North Sea, the high pressure, high temperature field is expected to start in 2019 and produce enough gas to meet 5% of total UK demand at peak production in 2020/21.last_img read more

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Civils Demolition

first_imgWinner#*#*Show Fullscreen*#*# Awards judge Clinton Dick welcomes Erith to the stage after the announcement of the Civils category resultErith ContractorsCountry United KingdomProject 22 Hanover SquareAlso shortlistedBudget Demolition (Canada)Delsan-AIM (Canada)Despe (Italy)Priestly Demolition (Canada)SummaryThis was an exceptional category with some outstanding entries. Indeed, the Delsan-AIM entry, for the Turcot Interchange Reconstruction in Montreal, Quebec, involved demolishing 15 structures including about 6 km (3.7 miles) of overpasses and a railway tunnel, had already been the subject of a popular presentation during the conference earlier in the day.However, it was Erith Contractors who received the judges’ ultimate backing, leading to a second visit to the stage for Grant Styles and Stuart Accleton.Representing Erith’s largest and most challenging substructure package to date, the 22 Hanover Square project saw it demolish a six-storey 1920s office block in Mayfair and create a four-storey basement.The project has paved the way for the creation of a 19,000 sq m (205,000 sq ft) mixed-use scheme comprising 41 apartments and a 51‑bedroom five‑star hotel, along with a restaurant and a luxury spa.Phase One of the project required demolition of the six-storey property and single-storey basement, with key aspects including soft-strip, asbestos removal, demolition, temporary works and basement works.Phase Two focused on the substructure and basement works. This required excavation to a depth of 54 m (16.7 m), underpinning, piling (including sheet, secant, bearing and plunge), installation of temporary steel propping and casting of basement slabs.As this project received the highest percentage of available ranking points in any category, Erith also received the overall “best of the best” World Demolition Award at the end of the evening. No surprise then that the judges called it “world class” and “a highly technical project made to look easy by the enabling specialists”.last_img read more

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How to build an Olympic Games

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited accesslast_img read more

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Out of time

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited accesslast_img read more

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What twerps we are …

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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Dominica not climate change ready

first_img Share LocalNews Dominica not climate change ready by: – April 9, 2014 Share Share Sharing is caring!center_img Tweet 118 Views   no discussions Director of the Environmental Coordinating Unit, Lloyd Pascal (Iisd photo)Director of the Environmental Coordinating Unit Lloyd Pascal has revealed that Dominica is not prepared to withstand the challenges of climate change.Climate change is a significant and lasting change in the statistical distribution of weather patterns over periods ranging from decades to millions of years.Climate can have several negative effects on the environment, economy, and health among several other areas.“Our country is in trouble because we are vulnerable to the effects of climate change, we are weak in terms of our own preparation, in terms of our own action to prevent,” Pascal said in an interview with Dominica Vibes on April 8, 2014.Pascal, who acknowledged that “we cannot stop” climate change, said preventative measures can be taken to avoid loss of life and damage to property.He noted that although some effort has been made by government to mitigate the effects of climate change through the construction of sea and river defence walls, there is a lot more work to be done.“We are trying our best but the island on a whole is not prepared”.He noted further that the Environmental Coordinating Unit, although small and viewed as insignificant “because not many people recognize that we are there except if there is any talk that may come about climate change”, is playing its part in helping to raise awareness on the effects of climate change.Pascal called on all sectors, including the Ministries of Agriculture and Tourism, to join forces with the Unit to address climate change which is one of the world’s biggest issues affecting humans.“All of these sectors that form the Dominica society are going to be affected one way or the other”.Moreover, Pascal said Dominica must now consider the construction of state of the art hurricane shelters to accommodate citizens as the current facilities being used are not suitable to serve its purpose.He explained that most of the shelters used; school and church buildings, “some of them are even weaker in terms of structure and some of these building are the first ones to fall when a hurricane passes”.“When it comes to hurricane shelter we are not prepared, there is no place when it comes to evacuation if you are in the path of a storm or a hurricane that you can be taken to in Dominica that will provide for you sleeping accommodation, food, sanitation conditions and so on”.Thus, the country must now focus on constructing hurricane shelters that can provide accommodation and all amenities.Dominica Vibes Newslast_img read more

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