Category: avdygbta

Want to improve your mood? Study suggests busy moms should choose exercise over extra sleep

first_imgEmail Share For most people, there never seems to be enough time in the day to complete everything we would like to do. This becomes even more difficult when we become parents. Parents are often forced to make many choices to manage their time every day.  In the midst of their busy lives, parents may wonder what the most efficient ways to spend their time are. Should I do the laundry now or later? Should I exercise or sleep in this morning?One team of researchers sought out to explore the best ways that busy working mothers can spend their time. “Working mothers appear to be an important population in deed of greater research attention as they report serious time constraints, poorer sleep satisfaction, and worse mental health,” the authors pointed out in their study, which was published in Mental Health and Physical Activity.Specifically, the researchers compared the benefits of sleep to the benefits of exercise for working mothers. Pinterest LinkedIncenter_img Share on Twitter Share on Facebook In this study, mothers were asked to keep daily diaries for two weeks, tracking their daily sleep and exercise habits, as well as their positive and negative moods. The mothers also tracked their sleep satisfaction and exercise intensity to see whether this would have any impact on their daily mood.The authors found that sleep satisfaction was related to participants’ moods—participants who experienced higher sleep satisfaction reported a more positive daily mood. Daily exercise also was linked to a more positive mood, and this was true regardless of the intensity of exercise.While both sleep and exercise helped improve the mothers’ daily moods, exercise was more beneficial than sleep was. These findings offer further support for the benefits of exercise on individuals’ mood. Even with various desires competing for mothers’ time, exercise still had a strong benefit.Is it possible that exercising simply helped the participants sleep better at night? This is unlikely, according to the study’s findings. There was no association between the intensity of physical activity and participants’ sleep satisfaction the following night.Although this research found that exercise helped boost participants’ mood more than sleep did, the authors said it is important to note that sleep is very important for maintaining a positive daily mood. A lack of regular exercise and sleep can be harmful to your mental and physical health.As the authors suggested, a more positive mood can have important impacts on individuals’ physical and mental health. The authors concluded that, “given that working mothers are a time-pressed population, short and intense physical activity bouts might be a good option.”last_img read more

Read More »

Stewardship / Resistance Scan for Jun 18, 2019

first_imgT2Bacteria panel shown to accurately detect ESKAPE bacteria in BSIsA diagnostic accuracy study has determined that the T2Bacteria Panel rapidly and accurately diagnoses bloodstream infections (BSIs) caused by five common pathogenic bacteria, according to a study today in the Annals of Internal Medicine.Researchers from several US universities compared results from the panel with those of blood culture for suspected BSI in 1,427 adults at 11 US hospitals from Dec 8, 2015, through Aug 4, 2017.The T2Bacteria Panel is made by T2 Biosystems of Lexington, Massachusetts. It is designed to identify the most common ESKAPE bacteria (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli).The investigators found that blood culture and T2Bacteria results were positive for targeted bacteria in 39 (3%) and 181 (13%) of patients, respectively. Per-patient sensitivity and specificity of T2Bacteria for proven BSIs were both 90%, and its negative predictive value was 99.7%. If probable BSIs and both probable and possible BSIs were assumed to be true positives missed by blood culture, per-patient specificity of T2Bacteria was 94% and 96%, respectively.Jun 18 Ann Intern Med abstract CARB-X announces funding for new antibiotic classCARB-X announced yesterday that is awarding United Kingdom–based Oxford Drug Design up to $2.55 million with the possibility of $4.24 million more to develop a new class of antibiotics to treat gram-negative bacterial infections using an approach designed to reduce the likelihood of emerging resistance.The company is working on drugs that inhibit aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs), enzymes that are essential for bacteria survival. Though aaRSs are a clinically validated target family, no inhibitors with systemic activity have reached the market. Also, the company has developed a new class of small-molecule aaRSs inhibitors that are active against gram-negative ESKAPE pathogens. The compounds target more than one synthetase site to decrease the probability of resistance development.Oxford Drug Design also received £2 million ($2.5 million) from Innovate UK, on behalf of the country’s Department for Health and Social Care, to support other aspects of the company’s tRNA synthetase inhibitor research portfolio.Kevin Outterson, JD, executive director of CARB-X, said in a press release from the group that CARB-X partners are making steady supporting innovative antibacterial research and development like the Oxford Drug Design project to treat drug-resistant bacterial infections. “But we know that much more is needed—more investment and global leadership to establish incentives that will ensure that life-saving products reach the market and patients who need them,” he added.Since its inception in 2016, CARB-X, a public-private partnership, has announced awards for 44 projects in 44 countries exceeding $216 million. Its goal is to invest more than $500 million by 2021 in innovative research and development to combat antimicrobial resistance.Jun 17 CARB-X press release Researchers detect multidrug-resistant E coli in Alaskan gullsA study led by US Geological Survey scientists yesterday in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy highlights the repeated detection of carbapenemase-producing E coli in gulls in Alaska, the first such report in US wildlife.The researchers collected 939 gull feces samples from seven locations in late spring and summer of 2016. Seven samples, four from the Kenai Peninsula sampled in June and August and three from Anchorage sampled in August, yielded E coli isolates exhibiting non-wild-type susceptibility to meropenem. All three of the Anchorage isolates harbored the blaKPC-2 carbapenemase gene. They also harbored genes associated with resistance to as many as eight antibiotic classes.The four Kenai E coli isolates harbored the blaOXA-48 carbapenemase gene, and they also harbored genes demonstrating resistance to five antibiotic classes.The authors conclude, “The isolation of CPE [carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae] from environmental samples collected in Alaska is both unprecedented and potentially relevant to local public health.”In an accompanying commentary, two experts from the Czech Republic write, “Wild animals are not only useful sentinels mirroring the presence of the AMR [antimicrobial resistance] in the contaminated environment in a particular area, but they also have been recognized as possible reservoirs, melting-pots, vectors and secondary sources of multi-drug resistant bacteria for humans and animals. Wild birds are ubiquitous and their faeces are freely dispersed into the environment, possibly contaminating surface waters and soils where crops are grown.”However, at this stage it is difficult to assess human health risks of the AMR in wildlife as it requires active surveillance of clinically relevant resistant bacteria in the environment including wildlife which is currently very limited. The use of antibiotics and human to human transmission is clearly the driving force in CPE dissemination.”Jun 17 Antimicrob Agent Chemother study Jun 17 Antimicrob Agent Chemother commentarylast_img read more

Read More »

News Scan for Apr 20, 2020

first_imgFlu research network details emergency response planAn influenza research network established by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 2007 to help answer key questions during outbreaks now has a response plan to help it prepare for new challenges. A team led by the Centers for Infectious Disease Research and Development (CIDRAP), which publishes CIDRAP News, detailed the plan yesterday in Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses.The Centers of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance (CEIRS) is a network of five multidisciplinary research centers, with several international partners, funded by the NIH. During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, for example, the network tackled key knowledge gaps that helped inform the outbreak response.To address organizational improvements, experts have suggested that the network address three main issues: having a mechanism to define the current technical response capabilities of each CEIRS center, establishing a more standardized research approach during emergencies, and defining more clearly the role of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases CEIRS project officer during an emergency response.To address the issues, the centers worked to develop the CEIRS Influenza Response Plan, and the new report describes the steps that went into the work. It also outlines and ranks CEIRS research priorities in an emergency situation and provides an operational strategy for executing them.Apr 19 Influenza Other Respir Viruses report Study: Hygiene in homes, daily life may reduce antimicrobial resistanceImproved hygiene in homes and communities can reduce antimicrobial resistance (AMR) by preventing infections and decreasing antibiotic prescribing, according to a position paper commissioned by the Global Hygiene Council in the American Journal of Infection Control.The authors said that such hygiene measures, combined with provision of clean water and proper sanitation, could reduce the circulation of resistant bacteria, regardless of a country’s socioeconomic status.AMR action plans typically address infection prevention and control only in healthcare settings, but the authors say that the greatest risk of disease transmission occurs in settings such as homes, workplaces, schools, daycares, and on public transportation. This is particularly important in light of increasing numbers of immunocompromised people receiving care at home.The authors recommend “targeted hygiene” measures such as hand washing and surface disinfection before, during, and after high-risk activities such as food handling, using the toilet, changing diapers, coughing, sneezing, washing clothing, and caring for an infected family member.To prevent microbicide-related AMR, however, the use of disinfectants needs to be appropriate, with attention to recommended concentrations and contact times.”The authors call upon national and international policy makers, health agencies and healthcare professionals to further recognize the importance of targeted hygiene in the home and everyday life settings for preventing and controlling infection, in a unified quest to tackle AMR,” the authors wrote.In a related study in the same journal, researchers also highlight the importance of hand washing, but in the setting of reducing hospital-acquired Clostridioides difficile transmissions.About 2,000 people die of infections with resistant bacteria every day worldwide, or about 730,000 a year, the authors of the position paper wrote. Apr 17 Am J Infect Control paper and related study Study supports antibiotics after umbilical clamping in C-sectionsA large prospective study by researchers in Switzerland suggests that it is safe to give prophylactic antibiotics to mothers after umbilical cord clamping in Caesarian section, as opposed to before. The results of the study appear in an abstract published by the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID).The study looked at data on mothers who were given surgical antibiotic prophylaxis (SAP) either within 60 minutes before incision or after clamping at 178 hospitals from 2009 to 2018. Antibiotics included cefuroxime, cefazolin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, or ceftriaxone. Using generalized linear multilevel models that adjusted for patient characteristics, procedural variables, and healthcare system factors, the researchers assessed the association between SAP administration relative to incision and clamping and the surgical site infection (SSI) rate.Among the 55,901 patients who met the study criteria, SAP was administered before incision in 26,405 patients (47.2%) and after clamping in 29,496 patients (52.8%). Overall, 846 SSIs were documented, of which 379 occurred before incision and 449 after clamping. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) for SAP administration after clamping was not significantly associated with an increased SSI rate (OR, 1.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.96 to 1.36; P = 0.144) when compared to before incision. Supplementary and subgroup analyses supported these main results.The World Health Organization currently recommends SAP in Caesarian section before incision to reduce the risk of SSIs, but the authors of the study say these findings, and the latest research on the potentially detrimental effects of early-life antibiotic exposure, are reasons to re-evaluate that guidance.ECCMID was cancelled this year because of the COVID-19 pandemic, but studies scheduled to be presented have been published in a book of abstracts.Apr 17 ECCMID abstractlast_img read more

Read More »

Analysis highlights troubles in the antibiotic pipeline

first_imgA new analysis of the antibiotic pipeline indicates there aren’t enough antibiotics in development to meet current and anticipated patient needs.The analysis, published this week by the Pew Charitable Trusts’ antibiotic resistance project, found that 41 new antibiotics with potential to treat serious infections are currently in various phases of clinical development, and four have been approved since June 2019. But while the antibiotics in development address many of the antibiotic-resistant pathogens that have been prioritized by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization (WHO), only a fraction will be approved.”We still have too few antibiotics for the superbugs that are out there today, and the ones we can anticipate…as they continue to mutate and evade our current stock of antibiotics,” said Wes Kim, PhD, MBA, senior officer with Pew’s antibiotic resistance project.Lack of novel drugsAccording to the analysis, which Pew conducts annually, 15 of the antibiotics currently in clinical development are in phase 1 clinical trials, 12 are in phase 2, and 13 are in phase 3, and 1 has had a new drug application submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). At least 18 have the potential to treat difficult-to-treat infections caused by gram-negative ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species).Gram-negative bacteria are particularly difficult targets for antibiotic development because of an additional outer membrane that protects them from many antibiotics.In addition, thirteen have potential activity against carbapenem-resistant and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae, A baumannii, and P aeruginosa. These are pathogens that the WHO has deemed critical threats because they are already resistant to multiple classes of antibiotics, and few treatments are left. Ten of the candidates target drug-resistant gonorrhea and Clostridioides difficile.But none of the candidates for treating gram-negative ESKAPE bacteria or the WHO critical-threat pathogens are novel drugs, meaning they don’t target these organisms with innovative mechanisms. Of the 41 antibiotics in the pipeline, only 10 are novel.”With any pipeline, you want novel antibiotics, some new mechanisms of action, or a new chemical class,” Kim said. “I think it’s fair to say…there’s an insufficient number of novel candidates.”Several of the candidates are variations on antibiotic classes that currently exist. As the WHO warned in its January report on the antibiotic pipeline, the concern is that these antibiotic candidates aren’t much different from what’s already out there, and that pathogens will easily develop resistance to them, using the defense mechanisms they already deploy against existing antibiotics.”But if they see something completely new, then they need to figure out new ways to evade it, and that’s why we continue to need novel antibiotics,” he said.An example of one of the candidates in the pipeline is cefepime plus enmetazobactam, which combines a beta-lactam antibiotic with an ESBL inhibitor. The combination has expected activity against ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and possible activity against carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and is currently in phase 3 trials. While the drug has produced encouraging results and could be an important new option for treating infections caused by these pathogens, beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations aren’t novel.”We’ve seen our pipeline populated recently with more of these combinations,” Kim said.In addition, Pew notes, only one in five infectious disease drugs that reach the stage where they’re tested in humans will receive FDA approval, and only 60% of the drugs that reach phase 3 trials will be approved.Pipeline dominated by small companiesAnother note of concern is that 95% of the antibiotics in development are coming from small pharmaceutical and biotech companies, and nearly 75% of these companies have no current product on the market.Most large pharmaceutical companies have abandoned antibiotic development because new antibiotics don’t sell well enough to produce a significant return on investment. Unlike drugs for chronic conditions, antibiotics are used for short periods, and new antibiotics are frequently held in reserve until older, cheaper antibiotics fail. In addition, hospital reimbursement for new antibiotics is low.The lack of financial return for new antibiotics is an even bigger challenge for the smaller companies. Two prime examples are Achaogen and Melinta Therapeutics, both of which declared bankruptcy in 2019 because of slow sales of their newly approved antibiotics. Infectious disease and antibiotic-resistance experts say the failure of these companies is further proof of the need for changes in the way that drug-makers are reimbursed for new antibiotics.Funding superbug preparednessPew says the situation is likely to remain unchanged without significant government intervention to help fix the broken antibiotic market.Among the interventions Pew supports is the DISARM Act, a bill introduced in Congress in 2019 that would create higher Medicare reimbursement for new antibiotics, while also requiring the hospitals that receive the increased payments to use the drugs appropriately. The DISARM Act was part of an early draft of the phase 3 coronavirus stimulus bill, but was not included in the final legislation.Kim said Pew will continue to advocate for the legislation, in combination with other incentives to fix the broken market for antibiotics. He added that the COVID-19 pandemic is highlighting why maintaining a robust antibiotic pipeline is so important.”What we’re seeing with the COVID-19 pandemic is the need for preparedness, and having the therapeutics is one pillar of the preparedness, and our concern is that, after COVID-19, if there is a pandemic for a particular superbug, we will be facing something similar to what we’re facing today,” he said.last_img read more

Read More »

Brazil: LUSCHI Conducts Dredging at Rio Grande Shipyard

first_imgPetrobras recently commenced the removal of the hull of P-66 platform in the Rio Grande Shipyard, Brazil. The operation required dredging to open the gate, which was conducted by LUSCHI.“About 30,000 cubic meters of sediment were dredged in less than 20 days using a hopper dredge and a very powerful submersible pump for inaccessible places,” said Roberto Britto, director of logistics LUSCHI.The dredging activities have started in March, alongside the works of partial flooding of the dry dock and inspection of the hull. The complete filling of the dock was taken on April 4, when the climatic conditions are presented adequate, until it reaches about 14 meters depth needed to open the door-boat.This platform is the first of eight replicant FPSOs (Floating Production Storage and Offloading) to be built for the development of the pre-salt projects, in the prolific Santos basin. This unit will have a processing capacity of 150,000 bpd of oil and 6 million m³/day of natural gas.More Info[mappress]Press Release, April 8, 2014last_img read more

Read More »

Profits down by a third at City outfit Nabarro

first_imgCity firm Nabarro today reported profits down by 35% and revenues down by 10%, describing the result as ‘disappointing’ but ‘not surprising’. Profits per equity partner declined from £574,000 in 2007/08 to £375,000 in the year ended 30 April. Revenues fell by 9.7%, from £140m to £126.5m. The firm’s profit margin dropped from 39% to 28%. Nabarro senior partner Simon Johnston said: ‘While the drop in revenue and net profit is disappointing, it is not surprising in such challenging economic times. The firm’s success over the past five years has ensured that we have a very strong platform from which to maintain and continue to build our business. ‘That platform has also allowed the firm to continue its strategic investment programme of recruiting lateral partners into the firm with key client relationships and strategically significant practice areas. We are also able to continue to invest in our clients and the future of the firm, by maintaining a dedicated commitment to our graduate recruitment programme and our trainees.’last_img read more

Read More »

Private housing completions in England have dropped by more than half since the credit crunch

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited accesslast_img read more

Read More »

Big trouble in Liverpool Chinatown

first_imgThe troubled New Chinatown development in Liverpool has been beset by difficulties for a number of years.The latest issues between the freeholder, Liverpool City Council, and the developer, Chinatown Development Company (CDC), are likely to have reputational, financial and legal consequences for those involved in the project over the months, and potentially years, ahead. As the various participants try and limit and/or recover their losses they are likely to be presented with difficult decisions about whether, and how, they pursue their claims.The development is a £200m regeneration project. The scale of the New Chinatown development, and the involvement of Liverpool council, which owns the freehold of the site, means much of its trouble has been played out in public.The recession led to the previous developer of the site, Urban Splash, withdrawing. CDC, a special purpose vehicle in the North Point Global (NPG) group, took over the project in 2015. In 2016 NPG reported that it had secured substantial foreign investment for the project through off-plan sales.The fallout from the scheme is unlikely to produce any real winnersUnfortunately, progress on, and confidence in, the development unravelled. Allegations of fraud against NPG’s selling agent in the Far East, Hong Kong Homes, are reported to have damaged the confidence of investors. Cash flow difficulties saw CDC’s first contractor, PHD1, become insolvent and eventually go into administration. The replacement contractor, the Bilt Group, also became insolvent and eventually went into liquidation.NPG started to explore its exit strategy. However, a proposed sale to Your Housing Group had to be abandoned in March 2017 after five months of negotiations. Matters escalated as Liverpool council expressed increasing dissatisfaction with the continued delay and lack of progress. Relations between NPG and the council deteriorated as allegations and counter-allegations, including in relation to criminal conduct, were aired in the press.Liverpool council is then reported to have objected to NPG agreeing terms for selling the site without having marketed it on the open market. The council considered whether it would obtain a compulsory purchase order to purchase the site before issuing a statutory demand against CDC for £950,000 in relation to two unpaid stage payments and serving a forfeiture notice for two leases on the site.Although CDC has challenged the statutory demand, NPG has announced that the damage to its brand means that it would be unrealistic to return to site on any of its projects and so it will seek to dispose of all of its property interests, return monies to buyer clients and then cease operations either on a private basis or following the appointment of insolvency practitioners.The New Chinatown development demonstrates the risks in a large development project. The fallout from the scheme is unlikely to produce any real winners. All participants will now be looking to limit their overall losses and protect their interests. The individuals involved will need to consider whether they have discharged, and are continuing to discharge, the duties they owe personally.The threatened forfeiture risks CDC’s continued involvement in the project if the site reverts to Liverpool council. The statutory demand threatens the continued existence of CDC as a winding up order will lead to a liquidator being appointed to realise CDC’s assets and distribute these to its creditors. The liquidator will also investigate CDC’s affairs and can pursue claims in respect of certain alleged misconduct and/or transactionsWhatever the outcome, the funders and investors in both Liverpool council and the New Chinatown development are now unlikely to secure the return on their investment they were hoping to achieve, if indeed they receive any return at all.NPG has announced that it is seeking to cease operations and so appears to already be engaged in a damage limitation exercise to limit its exposure. The off-plan buyers at the New Chinatown development are parties to contracts that will not be fulfilled.The council remains significantly exposed. As the freeholder and the main contracting party with CDC, it has a direct financial interest in the project and may need to agree terms with a new developer. As the city council it will also have broader considerations about securing future investment into the city.The failure of the New Chinatown development will leave insufficient money to satisfy the expectations and claims of all the participants. Unless parties can increase either the total funds available, or their share of those funds at the expense of others, there is a real risk that taking further action will be throwing good money after bad.Mark Fletcher is a senior associate in the commercial litigation team at Russell-Cookelast_img read more

Read More »

Tight squeeze for Felbermayr

first_imgA Terex AC 1000 all-terrain crane -in combination with a 500-tonne assist crane – was deployed by Felbermayr to install two heavy pipes.Space was at a premium inside the cooling tower. One side of the under-construction cooling tower was left open to allow the cranes to drive in. The AC 1000 was positioned to an accuracy of 10 cm inside the tower so that it was able execute the lifts without damaging the tower structure or the pipes. Felbermayr, operating under strict time constraints, only had five days to complete the installation.”We configured the AC 1000 with a 42 m luffing jib, 13 m outriggers, and a counterweight of 108 tonnes for the lifts,” explained Michael Lehner, Felbermayr project manager. The crane was configured and ready for use in only one day.In a tandem lift, Felbermayr lifted and positioned a 40 m long pipe – weighing approximately 37 tonnes – onto a concrete structure 64.5 m above the ground, inside the cooling tower.A second standalone lift performed by the AC 1000 hauled a 25 tonne, 12 m pipe to a height of 78 m within the tower. The crane then positioned the second plastic pipe on top of the first. The AC 1000 had to hold the pipe in place for five hours to ensure an adhesive that would bind the two pieces had fully cured. www.Felbermayr.ccwww.terex.comlast_img read more

Read More »

Mejia on board at Dan-Gulf

first_imgMejia joins Dan-Gulf from Intermarine, where he most recently served as commercial manager for the company’s north coast South America services.At Dan-Gulf he will be responsible for overseeing the management and development of the Caytrans BBC service operating between the US Gulf and north coast of South America, the Caribbean and Central America.Lines represented by Dan-Gulf include: Caytrans BBC; Caymar Limited and Caytrans Project Services (Americas).www.dan-gulf.comlast_img

Read More »

FashionBuzz © 2015 | All Rights Reserved Theme by Flythemes