Category: moyvqktq

Lake Havasu Dredging Grinds to Halt

first_imgThe Lake Havasu dredging project has been put on hold because of the thick lake weed. Floating lake weed patches are particularly thick in the area at the moment due to prevailing wind and current conditions causing frequent clogging of the jet drive intakes on the dredge boat.According to the Lake Havasu Marine Association President, Jim Salscheider, the project to increase lake’s depth in that area is about halfway complete and only needs about five more days of work.The overall depth of the channel has been increased by approximately 1-1/2′ to 2-feet and now ranges in depth from 4-1/2 to over 7 feet.Dredging will resume as soon as it is determined that water and weather conditions are more favorable to complete the project, likely in early October.[mappress mapid=”21002″]last_img read more

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The World Cup offers opportunities for lawyers and solicitor-agents

first_img David Green, head of employment at City firm Charles Russell, has some advice: ‘There are two ways you can play this. You can either accept that staff will want to watch the games, in particular the England games, and turn it into a positive. You could show the England game at the firm, provide food and drinks, making it clear that staff are allowed to watch it subject to the needs of the business, of course. Or you can be ‘Scrooge’ about it and not allow people to watch it, either on or off the premises or even online, and follow a disciplinary route if this is not followed. Enger-lund, Enger-lund, Enger-lund! Many lawyers are looking forward to tomorrow’s big kick-off as much as anybody else, and as one partner tells the Gazette: ‘During the World Cup most sports lawyers based in the UK will be watching as fans rather than advising on it!’ The question then is: how does a firm best deal with this month-long distraction for football-mad fee-earners? Mark Hovell, managing partner at George Davies in Manchester, is not following the Scrooge route and plans to let people leave at 2.55pm on the Wednesday of the England game – as long as their inbox is sorted by then. ACAS has also issued helpful guidance. The conciliation service says: ‘Use teamwork to get the best out of each other and, where possible, find compromises that will keep everyone happy.’ They recommend: being flexible by altering start and finish times during the working day or allowing longer lunch breaks; being clear ‘about what you expect from employees in terms of attendance and performance during the World Cup’; and being honest – ‘if you cannot accommodate any changes to your practices, then say so’. Polly Botsford is a freelance journalist ‘Feel it! It is here!’ runs the unofficial slogan, but it would be hard to miss a football World Cup, the most watched sporting event on the planet, which is beamed to two billion TVs. Among its devotees are sports lawyers, who seize on this quadrennial opportunity to make themselves busier, both in the UK and internationally. Sponsorship deals, image rights, marketing and brand protection (particularly ‘ambush marketing’) are all in their sights. Ambush marketing is the phenomenon whereby companies which are not official sponsors of the World Cup attempt to get their brand image across during the tournament and thus associate themselves with it – directly or indirectly. In South Africa, a budget airline which had called itself ‘the Unofficial National Carrier of the You-Know-What’, employing pictures of stadiums and national flags, had to pull its ads because FIFA said they were in breach of the rules. Ambush marketing raises issues of intellectual property (IP) infringement as well as potential breaches of commercial agreements and statutory provisions. In South Africa there is discrete legislation designed to plug any legal gaps pertaining to infringement and protect major events by prohibiting brands from improperly gaining an association with an event. Ambush marketing creates work for sports lawyers on both sides of the fence. Some are busy advising on how to protect against being ‘ambushed’ and uphold sponsorship arrangements. Jason Smith, a partner in Brabners Chaffe Street’s sports law team, was involved in advising Adidas on its sponsorship deal with world football’s governing body FIFA for 2007-2014. The deal sets out how Adidas can promote its association with FIFA and the obligations on FIFA to protect Adidas’s exclusivity. He says: ‘Ambush marketing is all about riding in on the back of the goodwill of an event. If you watch the TV ads now, you will see that, as the World Cup gets closer, brands are increasingly associating themselves with football to promote their products and services’. On the other side of the fence, sports lawyers are advising on how to get as close to the World Cup as possible without infringing those same rights when rolling out a particular advertising campaign, whether via billboards, ads on taxis, and in those very TV ads Smith was referring to. The commercial stakes are high. Other potential infringements relate to image. David Becker, a lawyer with niche virtual practice Halebury, explains: ‘There are potentially contentious issues such as photos of players being used in merchandise and the like, where image rights must be protected, and players will take action.’ Broadcasting rights create huge problems given the sheer number of channels involved (more than 350 in 2006) and countries broadcasting (over 200). Smith, whose client base includes FIFA, says: ‘There will be lawyers at the event monitoring TV channels and online media for any unauthorised broadcasts. Such a broadcast could be a licensed broadcaster which is only licensed to broadcast in certain territories but does so into others where another broadcaster has exclusive rights. Another example could be internet broadcasting, where a spectator sitting in the stands films a match and then broadcasts it on the internet. ‘Legal action may be taken against either the broadcaster for breaching its licensing agreement, or the world body which granted exclusivity and has not sufficiently protected this. Action could involve taking out an injunction, or, if a spectator is involved, evicting them from stadiums. Alongside issues of IP, football has myriad regulatory concerns which may arise during the tournament. Not only does FIFA have its own standing regulations, it also enters into participation agreements with national teams that govern the conduct of the players and teams on and off the pitch. Any issues that arise out of potential breaches of these regulations and agreements will be dealt with by specially appointed disciplinary bodies. In addition, the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) has a panel of arbitrators to deal with cases or appeals which can be resolved through arbitration. These could involve the use of banned performance-enhancing drugs (rare at a World Cup) or players who receive a match ban or suspension. Of course, during the actual games, when the 17 ‘laws of the game’ are at issue, the referee is the decision-maker and to all intents and purposes his decisions cannot be challenged. On occasion, however, action is threatened and sports lawyers do get involved. Ian Lynam is a partner at City firm Charles Russell, whose sports law department represents the Football Association, some domestic teams, and players including Thierry Henry. Lynam acted for Henry in the fallout from the notorious ‘Hand of Gaul’ incident during France’s World Cup qualifying match against Ireland, when FIFA threatened action in relation to the Barcelona striker’s controversial handball. Once the World Cup is over, the focus shifts to transfers. By the end of July, the cheques are being signed and new deals secured (the Premier League alone usually spends around £500m in this period). The World Cup can certainly increase interest in certain players, and some players will be deterred from signing contracts until after the tournament – ‘placing themselves in the shop window’, as Smith puts it. Players may also gain (or lose) endorsements. Some managers will see their reputations enhanced and new countries will show on the radar. This happened to Cameroon after Italia ’90, Romania after US ’94 and South Korea in 2002. As players are hawked around the world, transfers create new work for sports lawyers dealing with new contracts, immigration issues, sponsorship deals and image rights. Lynam says: ‘It is probably the transfer activity after the World Cup that will create the most work for UK sports lawyers. Although very few transfers will be completed during the tournament itself, the period between its conclusion and the end of August, when the transfer window closes, is always very busy.’ New preoccupations in the modern era are player privacy and media intrusion, and sports lawyers do monitor media coverage. Trevor Watkins, a litigation and dispute resolution partner at Clarke Willmott, says: ‘Every team will have a risk management policy as to what a player can and cannot do, and a strategy with how to deal with events that get out of hand.’ The World Cup is critically important in terms of public perception – think of the opprobrium piled on David Beckham when he was sent off against Argentina in 1998. Watkins adds: ‘Protecting and enhancing reputations will be key for those hoping to increase their profile and perhaps even, like certain cities in the UK for the 2018 tournament, host a World Cup themselves.’ It is not only sports lawyers who may be inundated with work, particularly when the World Cup is over – for lawyers who act as football agents this could also be a fruitful time. Lawyers are allowed to represent players as agents rather than just as solicitors under FA rules. They can do this in two ways: as a ‘registered agent’ (there are currently about 275 registered), they have to abide by the FA’s regulations; or they can come under the category of ‘exempt solicitor’ (there are 43 of these), where they are already regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority and therefore not subject to separate FA regulation. The EU objects to this exemption because it believes it may discriminate against agents who have to pass a test, but for the moment it remains. Lawyer-agents operate in much the same way as agents. Some even charge a commission just like agents, though perhaps at a lower level (commission tends to range from 3% to 12% of the transfer fee, and lawyer-agents often charge about 5%). Other lawyer-agents prefer to avoid that method and offer clients the traditional hourly rate structure. This could be attractive to a player client in a big-money transfer. The attraction to players of having a lawyer-agent is that they can offer that player what Brian McKibbin, an authorised agent and partner in the high street practice Harvey McKibbin, calls the ‘holistic approach’. Because the player does not have to pay a lawyer as well, ‘we can do anything an agent can do plus we can put a protective wrap around them, make them savings on taxes, help with wealth management, assist in disciplinary issues or reputation management,’ he says. ‘We can think long term for them.’ Ronnie Hutcheon, who has his own personal injury practice, has just started acting as an agent. He says his experience in personal injury litigation has prepared him well: ‘I am used to managing a client’s expectations in the way I have to manage a younger player’s expectations. There are lots of disappointments, for instance for a young player at an academy. I tell them what the options are, what the chances of success are. Some agents raise their expectations only to get them signed up.’ The motivations of these lawyer-agents do not appear to be purely commercial. Hutcheon says that he started acting as an agent partly out of an inherent love of football, but also because he is interested in boosting home-grown youth talent, particularly in his own city of Liverpool: ‘I do it because I love football and have contacts in the game who share that passion. It is not about the money for me.’ He recently launched a website and sponsors the grass roots club, AFC Liverpool: ‘There are plenty of young, talented footballers who are with schools here in Britain but don’t get anywhere. I want to nurture them and get them into good clubs.’ Of course, being a lawyer-agent is by no means straightforward and does have its risks. Lawyer-agents are often referred legal work relating to a contract or sponsorship deal. If an agent feels that the lawyer-agent is now acting in competition, then they may stop referring work. So, lawyer-agents need to be comfortable that they can afford this to happen. Solicitors also have to be aware of the many rules which apply to agents and not find themselves being used by the unscrupulous. For instance, under those regulations a solicitor cannot act as a conduit for an unlicensed agent and a player or club if they are merely ‘fronting’ a deal. Certainly, solicitors do get approached to do precisely this to make a deal appear legitimate. The FA will not take action against the unlicensed agent (because they can’t) but against the solicitor or the club or player for working with the unlicensed agent. Finally, there is an image problem, as Hutcheon vividly explains: ‘It is hard to be a lawyer and an agent because the public have a very poor perception of both professions. This is a “double whammy” for me and I have to overcome that! And let’s face it, it would be worth it to see one of your own players make it to the World Cup.’ ‘But then you may just get people pulling a sickie, or taking it as half a day’s holiday, or simply skiving off. Most clients accept the situation and are making staff feel that they are being given something.’ Thankfully, only one England group game actually falls on a working day, Wednesday 23 June. last_img read more

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Hidden wealth: How to be creative with asset-based lending

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

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Deadly protests erupt after Ethiopian singer killed

first_imgIsraelis of Ethiopian descent protest over police shooting Ethiopian police arrest suspected instigators of deadly conflicts Media watchdog demands police action after Tanzania beating Popular Ethiopian singer Hachalu Hundessa was killed on Monday. /Ethiopia ObserverSeven people have died in Ethiopia in protests that followed the shooting dead of musician Hachalu Hundessa, well known for his political songs, medics have told the BBC.Police are investigating his death.Hachalu’s songs often focused on the rights of the country’s Oromo ethnic group and became anthems in a wave of protests that led to the downfall of the previous prime minister in 2018.The 34-year-old was attacked on Monday evening when he was driving.Meanwhile Federal police arrested a powerful Ethiopian media tycoon on Tuesday after his bodyguards refused orders to disarm, the tycoon’s television station reported, as protests spread in the Oromiya region over the killing of a popular singer.The Oromia Media Network is owned by Jawar Mohammed, a prominent activist from Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed’s Oromo ethnic group.Jawar, an erstwhile ally of Abiy, became a vocal critic after he accused the prime minister of not protecting the interests of the Oromo.(With input from Reuters and BBC)Related Oromo youth chant slogans during a protest in-front of Jawar Mohammed’s house, an Oromo activist and leader of the Oromo protest in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, October 24, 2019. REUTERS/Tiksa Negerilast_img read more

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Gary Auguiste wins LIME-NYCD phone raffle

first_img Tweet 31 Views   no discussions Gary Auguiste receiving the gift from NYCD President, Jahisiah BenoitGary Auguiste, a student of the Dominica State College who hails from the village of Concord is the winner of a brand new Alcatel T’pop One touch phone complements LIME and the National Youth Council of Dominica (NYCD).Mr. Auguiste won the phone as part of a raffle conducted by the NYCD at its General Assembly in July 2013. Following a recent meeting between the General Manager of LIME and Members of the NYCD Executive Board the phone was made available to the NYCD so as to facilitate the raffle. The raffle was conducted on Monday February 3, 2014. Proceeds from the raffle will be used towards facilitating activities forming part of the NYCD 2013-2015 Work-plan. The NYCD would like to thank all the youth who participated in the raffle and encourage them to continue supporting positive youth initiatives. Share Sharecenter_img EducationLocalNewsTertiary Gary Auguiste wins LIME-NYCD phone raffle by: – February 7, 2014 Sharing is caring! Sharelast_img read more

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Marki Microwave MM1-2567 Mixer Operates upto 80 GHz

first_imgThe graph above shows that the mixer can operate up to 80 GHz. The conversion loss appears pretty high (close to 20 dB) at these frequencies, however the exact insertion loss of the mixer can no be determined at that frequency. The connectors in this set-up were all only rated to 67 GHz, and this is in a connectorized microstrip package that has its own losses. With all that, the performance of the chip doesn’t look too bad. The predicted CL is actually the measured loss of the MM1-2567LS from the datasheet, so it is there to confirm that their experimental method makes some sense. This is an innovative way to test performance of mixers at higher frequencies. Read the complete blog post about this on the Marki Microwave Website. This is because the result above includes two conversions, as well as the loss of the filter. If they divide this by two and make some assumptions about the loss of the filter (remember they can’t measure that directly above 67 GHz either), they get this: First they generated a 50 GHz LO signal using their A-2050 amplifier – this was the highest frequency LO that they could provide. They used this to upconvert a 5-30 GHz input signal up to two sidebands: 45-20 GHz and 55-80 GHz. They then filtered out the LO feedthrough and the lower sideband using an FH-5500 High Pass Filter. Next they downconverted the resultant single sideband signal using a second MM1-2567 Mixer. The result is a high conversion loss, and an ugly signal:center_img In a recent blog post, Marki Microwave demonstrated that, the MM1-2567 Mixer (their highest frequency mixer) actually operates even above 67 GHz, which is the value specified in the datasheet. This mixer was actually designed to operate up to a frequency of 80 GHz on the RF and LO sides, however their test equipment could only measure conversion losses up to 67 GHz. To test above this frequency, Marki Microwave set up an experiment to if this mixer could operate up to 80 GHz. Here is what they did:last_img read more

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New NI WLAN Test Toolkit Supports the Latest IEEE 802.11ax Draft Standard

first_imgNational Instruments has announced their WLAN Test Toolkit 17.0 with support for Draft 1.1 of the IEEE 802.11ax standard. Combined with NI’s second-generation Vector Signal Transceiver (VST), the WLAN Test Toolkit 17.0 supports 802.11ax waveform generation and analysis for characterization, validation and production test of products, such as RF front end components, wireless modules and user devices, that implement Draft 1.1 of the IEEE 802.11ax standard.The WLAN Test Toolkit 17.0 empowers designers and engineers with the ability to generate and analyze a wide range of 802.11ax standard-compliant waveforms, including extended single user, multiuser OFDMA and multiuser multiple input, multiple output (MIMO) with per-user configuration and measurement results. The toolkit helps users solve demanding new access point test cases by generating signals that simulate multiuser environments, including per-user impairments. Engineers can also use the new software to generate trigger frames to test the real-time response of client devices and make power pre-correction and relative center frequency measurements.As the standardization and evolution of 802.11ax continues, engineers require a software-centric test approach that can keep pace with the latest standard features and challenging new test cases. Taking advantage of NI’s modular platform and second-generation VST can help users lower their cost of test and reduce time to market.With the WLAN Test Toolkit 17.0 and second-generation VST, engineers can configure up to 8×8 MIMO systems in a single PXI chassis. Users can also expect EVM measurements better than -50 dB, leading to rigorous device characterization and reliable test results. Furthermore, engineers can control their systems with the toolkit’s generation and analysis soft-front panels, and benefit from extensive LabVIEW, C and .NET system design software APIs and example code when programming and automating their systems.The WLAN Test Toolkit 17.0 expands NI’s wide-ranging product portfolio for testing 802.11a/b/g/j/n/p/ac/ax, Bluetooth, 2G, 3G, 4G, FM/RDS, GNSS and low-power Internet of Things (IoT) wireless standards. NI’s platform-based approach helps ensure that users can update their existing PXI RF test systems to support 802.11ax device testing with a simple software update, and continue to do so as the 802.11ax standardization process evolves. Engineers can take advantage of this smarter approach to RF test to help lower their cost of test and better prepare for future connectivity and cellular standardization initiatives, such as 5G.Click here to learn more about NI’s solutions for 802.11ax.last_img read more

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Hurricane Laura ‘will cause unsurvivable storm surge’

first_imgEvacuations are complicated by the Covid-19 pandemic. Texas Governor Greg Abbott urged families who could afford it to take refuge in hotels and motels to be distanced from others. Port Arthur, Texas, is home to the nation’s largest oil refinery, and workers have been taken off at least 310 offshore facilities in the Gulf of Mexico, reducing oil production by 84% for a second day in a row, officials said. In Jamaica, there were reports of landslides and flooded roads. (BBC) Well-built homes could incur major damage, trees could be snapped or uprooted and electricity and water would be unavailable for days or even weeks, it said. Unsurvivable storm surge with large and destructive waves will cause catastrophic damage from Sea Rim State Park, Texas, to Intracoastal City, Louisiana, including Calcasieu and Sabine Lakes. This surge could penetrate up to 30 miles inland from the immediate coastline. #Laura pic.twitter.com/bV4jzT3Chd— National Hurricane Center (@NHC_Atlantic) August 26, 2020 Governor Abbott urged people in the path of the storm to “take advantage of these final few hours to evacuate”. More than 420,000 Texas residents have been ordered to leave, while an additional 200,000 were told to evacuate Calcasieu Parish in south-western Louisiana. Initially it was feared that both storms would hit Louisiana as hurricanes within 48 hours of each other – an unprecedented event – but Marco was downgraded to a tropical storm. What can we expect from Hurricane Laura? “To think that there would be a wall of water over two storeys high coming on shore is very difficult for most to conceive, but that is what is going to happen,” said National Weather Service meteorologist Benjamin Schott. Hurricane Katrina – which devastated New Orleans in 2005, killing more than 1,800 people – was a Category Five storm before weakening to a Category Three when made landfall in the US. US President Donald Trump told those potentially affected by the storm to “listen to local officials” as the storm was “very dangerous and rapidly intensifying”. Laura is expected to reach landfall near the Texas-Louisiana border between midnight and 02:00 local time on Thursday (07:00 GMT). In Cuba, authorities have evacuated at least 160,000 people from several coastal regions, while thousands have been evacuated in the Dominican Republic. In a series of tweets, it said Laura was expected to bring “life-threatening hazards” and an “unsurvivable storm surge” to parts of the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. As of 23:00 local time (04:00 GMT) the centre of the hurricane was 65 miles (105km) south east of Port Arthur in Texas. Marco and Laura brought high winds and rough seas to the Caribbean, leaving at least 24 people dead, including a baby and an eight-year-old child in Haiti.center_img “Hurricane force winds and widespread damaging wind gusts will also spread well inland into portions of eastern Texas and western Louisiana early Thursday,” the NHC added. Laura, on the other hand, has strengthened rapidly from a Category 3, gaining 70% in power in just 24 hours, to a Category 4, maximum sustained winds of 140mph (220km/h). Storm surges of more than 20ft (6m) are possible. In an update at 14:00 local time, the NHC reported 3.2ft of inundation already on parts of the Louisiana coast. Early on Wednesday the NHC said satellite images had shown that Laura had undergone a remarkable intensification to become a “formidable hurricane”. Heavy rains have also battered parts of Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and the US territory of Puerto Rico. President Trump declared a state of disaster in the territory on Saturday. “The power of Hurricane Laura is unprecedented, and Texans must take action now to get out of harm’s way and protect themselves,” he said. Laura and another storm, Marco, earlier hit the Caribbean, killing 24. Marco has already struck Louisiana, bringing strong winds and heavy rain on Monday. Hurricane Laura is expected to cause an “unsurvivable” storm surge, extreme winds and floods as it hits the US, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) says. Photo from: NBC News Half a million residents have been told to leave the area. If it maintains those speeds it would be one of the strongest storms to ever hit the US south coast. It is now close to becoming a Category Five storm, which would mean maximum sustained winds of 158mph (254km/h). “The word ‘unsurvivable’ is not one that we like to use, and it’s one that I’ve never used before,” he added. What happened in the Caribbean? The Category 4 storm is approaching Texas and Louisiana with maximum sustained wind speeds of 150 miles per hour (240km/h).last_img read more

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Primary Election Day Today

first_imgIn District 30, incumbent Republican representative Gary Knopp is running unopposed. Governor Bill Walker, an independent, is skipping Tuesday’s primaries, while former U.S. Sen. Mark Begich is unopposed in the Democratic primary. Libertarian William “Billy” Toien also is running. For Senate District O, incumbent Peter Micciche is up against challenger Ron Gillham, both of Soldotna. Here are the candidates for Kenai Peninsula voters… Former state Senator Mike Dunleavy and former Lt. Governor Mead Treadwell are seeking the Republican nomination for governor. The winner advances to the November general election. In District 31, incumbent Paul Seaton is running a nonpartisan candidate in the Democratic primary.center_img Republicans will choose between three primary candidates, Sarah Vance of Homer, John Cox of Anchor Point and Henry Kroll of Anchor Point. FacebookTwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Polls open today for the State of Alaska’s Primary Election and KSRM News will have updates tonight as the results filter in. Polls will be open 7am-8pm. Voters will also select a Republican to move on to what’s expected to be a closely watched Governor and Lt. Governor race this fall and choose the latest contender to try to unseat the longest-serving member of the U.S. House. In House District 29, Republicans will choose between Wayne Ogle and Ben Carpenter, both of Nikiski. Democrats have a single candidate, Shawn Butler of Hope.last_img read more

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Saban looking for more from Tide’s defensive backs this spring

first_imgTUSCALOOSA – Nick Saban is putting even the most veteran of Alabama’s defensive backs on notice this spring.The Alabama head coach ripped into senior safety Geno Smith after the part-time starter didn’t complete an interception drill, and then walked back to the line rather than jogged as expected, during Friday’s open viewing period of spring practice.“If you want to be a starter, act like it,” Saban scolded Smith, an expected starter at free safety this season.The message was clear, shape up and do it right or Saban will find someone else.“What I want is competition. I want guys to compete to be the best,” Saban said Wednesday. “I don’t want them to feel like ‘Oh it’s my turn to play now because I’ve been sitting behind these guys for a while, and I want to see a lot of energy and enthusiasm and intensity in the way they compete.”Earlier in the week, Saban was critical of another one of his veterans when he challenged junior cornerback and returning starter Eddie Jackson “to improve.”“Eddie’s got to improve, in my opinion, as all players do,” Saban said. “(He) probably gave up too many big plays last year. And that’s something we’ve got to improve on.”For Saban, it’s a matter of the defensive backs buying into what he and new secondary coach Mel Tucker are trying to teach them this spring.“You’ve got to believe, trust in the technique that you’re being taught and go out there and try and execute,” Saban said, “and do it and use all the things that you’re being taught to help you have a chance to be successful, and I don’t think we did that last year enough in the secondary.”Saban, a former defensive backs coach that still likes to work in and instruct during secondary drills at Alabama, is spending this spring trying to create some solid depth in the secondary, where both starting safeties are gone and a starting corner (senior Cyrus Jones) is on the mend this spring and sitting out after a hip surgery in the offseason.The lack of defined starters has created an opportunity for players to actually compete for spots on the depth chart, with several younger or less experienced players like redshirt freshman Marlon Humphrey and true freshman Ronnie Harrison receiving ample opportunities to shine this spring.“We’re really trying to emphasize that (competitiveness) with some of our players that have not played. If you’re going to be a starter, you have to act like a starter and you have to play like one,” Saban said. “You have to elevate your game, your effort, your intensity, your toughness, your discipline to execute. All those things need to be at a higher standard. So we’ll see who gets that done.”Nevertheless, Jackson and sophomore Tony Brown appeared to be the first-team corners, with sophomore Hootie Jones and Smith at strong and free safety, respectively, during positional drills Friday.The defensive backs did have a familiar face back among the group during Friday’s practice after sophomore speedster Anthony Averett was back with the secondary after Saban announced Wednesday the team was experimenting with him at receiver. “He’s a guy that has great speed, and we’d like to find a role for him on the team,” Saban said. “He was doing a really good job at corner and had made a significant amount of improvement. But we want to do experiments with guys in the spring.”It appears, at least for Friday’s practice, that that experiment has been shelved.last_img read more

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