Category: ryycewbn

Video: Unrolling a biblical scroll without even touching it

first_imgNearly 1500 years ago, a village in eastern Israel near modern-day Ein Gedi burned to the ground, leaving behind the charred remains of homes, a synagogue, and a scroll of the Hebrew Bible’s Book of Leviticus. Now, nearly 50 years after the scroll was discovered buried in the burned synagogue, scientists can read its charred remains line by line, all without touching its crumbling animal skin manuscript. Through a technique called x-ray microtomography, researchers were able to create digital slices of the scroll, which they then separated into individual “pages” they could view using a computer, they report today in the journal Science Advances. The researchers then spliced together more than 100 separate pages by hand to create a single, “unrolled” scroll, as seen in the video above. Aside from the famed Dead Sea Scrolls, the Ein Gedi Scroll is the earliest scroll of writing from one of the books of the Torah, or the Jewish Bible, ever found. This noninvasive technique should allow researchers to read other fragile ancient documents, such as those buried by the 79 C.E. eruption of Mount Vesuvius in Italy, without ever having to lay a finger on them. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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Scientists tackle a burning question: When will our quiet sun turn violent?

first_img By Sarah ScolesMay. 30, 2019 , 2:00 PM The sun returnsto solarminimum, butthe polarity ofits poloidal fieldis reversed. At solarmaximum,the sunspotsare morecommonand closer tothe equator. C. BICKEL/SCIENCE Scientists are trying to understand what drives the sun’s 11-year cycle so they can predict solar maximum. During this period of heightened magnetic activity, sunspots are more common, as are the dangerous solar storms, or coronal mass ejections, that hurl charged particles at Earth. Differential rotation in the sun’s convective zone is thought to be responsible for winding up andstrengthening magnetic fields. During the last solar minimum, he watched as the bright points—and presumably, the bands—overlapped at the equator. McIntosh calls the encounter “the Terminator,” because he thinks it is the moment when the two bands—which have opposite magnetic polarity—cancel each other out, marking the abrupt end of one 11-year cycle and the beginning of the next. But because the sun’s north and south magnetic pole are flipped at the end of each cycle, McIntosh prefers to talk about an extended 22-year cycle. He hopes that by understanding the bands, scientists will finally be able to produce reliable and accurate forecasts.The team is still working out exactly why these supposed bands would form. In a 2014 paper in The Astrophysical Journal, McIntosh and his colleagues set out their best guess: Giant swirling cells near the base of the convective zone form tubes of magnetic flux that appear on the surface as activity bands.In the midst of their research, they discovered they weren’t alone: In the 1980s, other scientists had published a paper in Nature describing basically the same idea. But that work disappeared into obscurity. Now, the idea of an extended, 22-year cycle is catching on again with some researchers. HAO scientist Mausumi Dikpati recently published a Nature paper that builds on McIntosh’s ideas. The magnetic bands, she hypothesizes, also produce “magnetic dams,” which hold back piled-up plasma. When the bands meet and annihilate each other, the dams break. The plasma rolls up from the equator toward the midlatitudes at 300 meters per second in what Dikpati calls a “solar tsunami.” The waves drive magnetic fields to the surface, creating the first sunspots of the next cycle a few weeks later.Dikpati, who’s an adviser to the panel, presents this research to the panelists, who, by this point, have a lot to consider before they cast their votes.By the final day, the snow has melted off the pines. It is time for the panel to make its prediction. Biesecker looks tired as he stands before the panelists. “A consensus among experts can often be a better prediction of the future state of a system than the set of individual predictions,” he says.McIntosh hovers in the doorway again as the panelists solemnly vote, their predictions and estimates of uncertainty based on an instinctive assessment of the models. Biesecker dutifully tabulates the estimates, and comes up with a peak sunspot range: 95 to 130. This spells a weak cycle, but not notably so, and it’s marginally stronger than the past cycle. He does the same with the votes for the timing of minimum. The consensus is that it will come sometime between July 2019 and September 2020. Maximum will follow sometime between 2023 and 2026.McIntosh has his own private prediction: a peak of 155 sunspots, in mid-2023. He concedes he could be wrong. But a successful prediction, he hopes, will win his model some acceptance. “If the predictions hold,” McIntosh says, “at some point someone has to sit up and take notice.”Who, if anyone, is right won’t be known for years. Meanwhile the sun, approaching minimum, is proving as surprising as ever. The night before, that active region of sunspots erupted for an hour straight. The particles from the coronal mass ejection will arrive in a matter of days.As the panel preps its predictions and perfects its messaging, the storm charges toward Earth, ready or not.*Clarification, 19 June, 2 p.m.: Michael Martinez’s affiliation has been changed to reflect the absorption of DigitalGlobe by new parent company Maxar. At solarminimum,the sun’smagneticfield ispoloidal, likea barmagnet’s. 1 4 5 6 7 2 3 Turbulentmotionstear apartsunspots.The meridional flow nudgesremnants tothe poles. Motions inthe sunwind up thefields untilthey becometoroidal. 0 1750 Sunspot number 1800 1850 1900 Modern maximum Daltonminimum Cycle 1 Cycle 24 1950 2000 50 100 150 200 250 Meridionalflow Poloidal field Radiativezone Toroidal field Convectivezone Sunspot Sunspots are dark because theyare cooler than the surroundinghot gas. These intenselymagnetic knots burst throughthe surface, unleashing energyfor days or weeks before fading. Telltale spots Since accurate sunspot counts began in the mid-1700s, the sun has been through 24 cycles,each lasting about 11 years. Forecasts suggest the 25th cycle will be moderately weak. Pulse of the sun Dynamo models—3D simulations of the sun—cannot make sunspots, but theyindicate how motions inside the suntransform the shape of its magnetic field over an 11-year solar cycle. Whipped into shape A churning, burning star Scientists tackle a burning question: When will our quiet sun turn violent? BOULDER, COLORADO—For all of February the sun is nearly spotless, a smooth circle filled in with a goldenrod crayon. It has been more than a decade since it was so lacking in sunspots—dark magnetic knots as big as Earth that are a barometer of the sun’s temperament. Below the surface, however, a radical transition is afoot. In 5 years or so, the sun will be awash in sunspots and more prone to violent bursts of magnetic activity. Then, about 11 years from now, the solar cycle will conclude: Sunspots will fade away and the sun will again grow quiet.In early March, a dozen scientists descend on the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) here to predict when the sun will reach its peak, and how unruly it will become. As light reflects off snow caught in the trees and streams through the tall windows of a conference room, the Solar Cycle 25 Prediction Panel comes to order. NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have sponsored these panels since 1989, aiming to understand what drives the sun’s 11-year cycles and assess methods for predicting them. But the exercise is not just academic: The military, satellite operators, and electric utilities all want to know what the sun has in store, because the flares and bursts of charged particles that mark solar maximum can damage their technologies.Sunspots can be seen with the naked eye, but it wasn’t until the mid-1800s that astronomers realized they come and go on a rough schedule. They first appear at midlatitudes and then proliferate, migrating toward the equator over about 11 years. In 1848, Swiss astronomer Johann Rudolf Wolf published an account of the sunspot record, identifying 1755–66 as “Cycle 1,” the first period when counts were reliable. He then created a formula for counting the number of daily sunspots—a somewhat subjective technique that has evolved into a counting method used today to marry data sets across the centuries.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The cycles are capricious, however. Sometimes, the sun goes quiet for decades, with anemic sunspot counts across several cycles—as occurred during the 19th century’s so-called Dalton minimum. Such variations are what the scientists at NCAR have gathered to forecast. The problem is that no one—in this room or elsewhere—really knows how the sun works.Most models snatch at reality, but none pieces together the whole puzzle. The last time the panel convened, in 2007, its scientists evaluated dozens of models and came up with a prediction that was far from perfect. It missed the timing of the maximum, April 2014, by almost a year, and also the overall weakness of the past cycle. This panel, a who’s who list of solar scientists, doesn’t know whether it will do better.As the NCAR clock ticks toward the start time, the panelists sit in awkward silence, clutching their compostable coffee cups. They know what the next 4 days hold: fights over physics and intuition, belief and data, correlation and causation. Tensions shadow the gathering: Scott McIntosh, director of NCAR’s High Altitude Observatory (HAO) here, has an office above the meeting room and his own unorthodox view of what drives the solar cycle and how to predict it. But McIntosh, outspoken and provocative, has not been invited to be on the panel, although a collaborator will present the HAO’s research.At 8:30 a.m., the panel’s earnest leader, Doug Biesecker—who works at NOAA’s Space Weather Prediction Center here and commutes by bike regardless of the weather—welcomes everyone to the task: sorting through the many models and coming to a consensus about the next cycle. “The mess that you get from the community needs to be synthesized into something that is ideally correct,” Biesecker says. “But you know, how can we know what’s going to be correct?”They can’t.As if to prove the point, 14 surprise sunspots appear, seething on the surface that had been so featureless for so long. Jupiter Earth Sun Core Drawn to scale Coronal massejection Meridionalflow Slower spinat poles Faster spinat equator Radiativezone Convectivezone Corona Loopingmagneticfields Sunspot Hot rising gascenter_img Scott McIntosh, High Altitude Observatory If the predictions hold, at some point someone has to sit up and take notice. NASA/SDO; AIA, EVE, AND HMI SCIENCE TEAMS Michael Martinez, Maxar McIntosh doesn’t question the need to prepare, but he is skeptical of the panel’s approach. In fact, he believes its very premise—predicting the rise and fall of sunspots—is off-base. Sunspots, and the cycle itself, are just symptoms of a still-mysterious story playing out inside the sun.Lika Guhathakurta, a panel observer from NASA’s Ames Research Center in California, agrees. “Sunspot is not a physical index of anything,” she says, after the morning’s introductory talks. “So the fact that we have used it as a proxy in itself kind of presents a problem.” Using sunspots—a side effect, not a cause—to predict the sun’s future behavior is like trying to divine the germ theory of disease by looking at a runny nose, she and McIntosh think.But because the panelists have convened specifically to predict sunspot numbers, they soldier on, reviewing about 60 models over the next 4 days. Each predicts the number of sunspots at solar maximum, as well as the timing of minimum and maximum.Many of the models rely on “precursors”—observable proxies, not unlike sunspots themselves, that have proved to be empirically useful in predicting the timing or magnitude of solar maximum. A popular one is the magnetic field strength at the sun’s poles at solar minimum. Telescopes can measure this field strength by gauging how atoms above the sun’s surface absorb certain wavelengths of light. A weak field usually heralds a quiet cycle, because the polar fields represent the seeds that will punch through as sunspots and grow into the activity of the coming solar cycle. Robert Cameron, a panelist and solar physicist at the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in Göttingen, Germany, says that over about four cycles of direct observation and more than a century of indirect data, the correlation “is good and highly statistically significant.”Other precursor models rely on effects of the solar cycle on Earth. For 170 years, for example, observatories around the world have tracked disturbances in Earth’s magnetic field, which tend to be more frequent at solar maximum. But by measuring something on Earth rather than the sun, the methods are a step removed, says Dean Pesnell, project scientist for NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory and a researcher at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “They’ve had a mixed record.”Another approach resembles climate prediction: using physics-based simulations of the sun to predict how it will evolve. The models, which combine theories of electromagnetism and fluid dynamics, start with the sun’s current conditions and calculate its evolution through the cycle. And they’re improving, says Maria Weber, a panelist and fellow at the University of Chicago in Illinois. Increased computing power and better algorithms mean scientists can run simulations in a few hours that a decade ago would have taken weeks. They also have more measurements to calibrate the models: not just sunspot counts and polar field measurements, but also helioseismology data—measurements of vibrations that probe the sun’s interior—that can capture the flow of plasma beneath the sun’s surface. Kinks in thefields emergeas sunspots,first atmidlatitudes. These “dynamo” models are providing insights into how the shape of the sun’s magnetic field changes over the course of a cycle. At first the field is primarily poloidal—with field lines running from pole to pole like a bar magnet’s. But as the sun’s differential rotation twists up the magnetic field, its shape becomes toroidal, wrapping around the star like a doughnut. “That’s when the magnetism specifically creates sunspots,” Weber says.Over time, the “meridional flow,” an equator-to-pole circulation in the convective zone, ushers these superficial magnetic fields back toward the poles, converting the toroidal fields back into poloidal ones. Although the models can re-create this basic 11-year cycle, Weber says they still have one big failing. “No dynamo model has been able to actually create sunspots,” Weber says. The modelers use intense toroidal magnetism as a proxy for sunspot-producing bands.Still other models seek correlations like a conspiracy theorist: anywhere they can find them. One looks at how the decline of sunspots three cycles ago relates to the peak of the current cycle. Another links the prior cycle length to the minimum sunspot number. “There’s not very much physics involved,” concedes panelist Rachel Howe of the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom, who has been tasked with reviewing the mishmash of statistical models. “There’s not very much statistical sophistication either.”Panelist Andrés Muñoz-Jaramillo of the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder agrees with Howe. “There is no connection whatsoever to solar physics,” he says in frustration. McIntosh, who by now has walked downstairs from his office and appears in the doorway, is blunter. “You’re trying to get rid of numerology?” he says, smirking.”That’s how some science has occurred,” protests Lisa Upton, Biesecker’s co-chair and a physicist at Space Systems Research Corporation in Alexandria, Virginia: You find an obscure quantitative relationship you don’t understand, and only later do you model what it means physically.Biesecker concedes the point. “But we haven’t really found one that seems to work,” he says. “And we’ve been doing it for hundreds of years.”McIntosh is irritated that the panel is weighing models he considers dubious. “This is how churches spring up,” he says. “You’re a disciple of a disciple of a disciple.” McIntosh, who didn’t study astrophysics in school and instead focused on math and physics, has his own idea of how the sun works—and it doesn’t spring from one of the popular models.Around 2002, he started to catalog bright features that, in extreme ultraviolet images of the sun’s outer atmosphere, or corona, look like buoys floating in the glowing plasma. These bright points, he found, follow a similar path across the sun as the sunspots, except they start higher, at about 55° latitude, before marching toward the equator. McIntosh hypothesizes that both sunspots and bright spots reflect parallel bands of magnetic flux that, at the beginning of each cycle, crop up at high latitudes and, like clockwork, meet at the equator at the cycle’s end. The bright points, however, could be better markers for the bands—more closely linked to what’s going on deep inside the sun. Even on its calmest days, the sun is roiling. Fueled by fusion in its core, the sun is a ball of hot, charged particles, or plasma, that churns constantly, generating electric currents that in turn induce magnetic fields. Deep inside the sun is a dense radiative zone, where photons slowly fight their way outward. At a certain point—in the outer third of the sun—the plasma cools enough to allow convection, a boiling motion that carries energy toward the surface. In this zone, the sun rotates differentially: faster at the equator than the poles. The shearing motions that result stretch and twist the magnetic fields, strengthening them—a process that somehow affects the 11-year cycle. The tangled field lines sometimes burst through the convective zone and jut out from the surface, forming sunspots.The sun’s ebb and flow affects Earth. Its upper atmosphere absorbs the sun’s ultraviolet rays, which dim slightly at solar minimum. That causes the atmosphere to cool and shrink, reducing friction for low-flying satellites. In calm solar cycles, operators assume their satellites will remain in orbit for longer—and because the same goes for space junk, the risk of a collision goes up. The sun’s magnetic field also weakens at solar minimum, which poses another threat to satellites. The weakened field rebuffs fewer galactic cosmic rays, high energy particles that can flip bits in satellite electronics.At solar maximum, in contrast, the sun heats and inflates Earth’s upper atmosphere, and it often flares up and unleashes its own particles. They are not as energetic as the galactic cosmic rays, but they come in a flash flood. At solar max, Biesecker says, these “coronal mass ejections” of charged particles are 10 times as frequent as at minimum. Hours or days after the sun spits them out, particles rush into Earth’s magnetic field, provoking geomagnetic storms that can last for days. The storms can disrupt communications, interrupt spacecraft and missile tracking, and skew GPS measurements. They can also induce powerful currents in electric grids, which can destroy transformers and other equipment. Air crews at high altitudes, particularly near the poles, can be showered with the sun’s energetic particles—a cancer risk.All of which adds to the practical importance of the panel’s forecasts. “If you design a satellite for a 10- or 12-year life, you need to consider the cycle,” says Michael Martinez, vice president of mission operations at Maxar in Westminster, Colorado, which makes high-resolution imaging orbiters. Designers need to be sure a satellite has enough propellant to combat the friction of an expanding atmosphere as the sun approaches maximum, and they need to shield its electronics from solar particles.Most worrisome is the prospect of a major solar storm, such as the Carrington Event of 1859. During that storm, the sun ejected billions of tons of charged particles, causing aurorae as far south as the Caribbean and generating currents in telegraph lines powerful enough to shock operators. Today, the effect of such an event on computers and communications would be dire. Financial transaction systems could collapse. Power and water could easily go out. “It probably would be The Hunger Games pretty soon,” McIntosh says. The remnantscancel theoriginalpoloidalfield and buildup a new one. A spotless sun, as seen in May by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory. The sun is nearing solar minimum. If you design a satellite for a 10- or 12-year life, you need to consider the cycle.last_img read more

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Press Council chairman Justice Katju slams media for dumbing down

first_imgWhether swinging the gavel or wielding the pen, Justice Markandey Katju likes to spring surprises. And, in the process, he often courts controversy. Ever since he took over as the Chairman of the Press Council of India on October 5 last year, he has generated a series of national uproars-by his “poor opinion” of the Indian media and popular icons, call for tougher measures to control the press and the Internet or comments on who should be awarded the highest civilian honour, the Bharat Ratna. The Editors Guild of India and the Broadcast Editors’ Association have called him “irresponsible and negative” but Justice Katju, who cites Ghalib or Tulsidas with equal ease, insists that he has been misunderstood. In a rare interview with Damayanti Datta, Deputy Editor, India Today, he unrolls for the first time his “grand vision” for the Indian media. Q: You have critiqued the media from the time you took over as the Chairman of Press Council of India. What is it that you object to? A: The media has lost its sense of proportion. Ninety per cent of Indian media coverage, especially electronic media, goes to providing entertainment-lives of film stars, fashion parades, cricket, disco dancing, reality shows, astrology and so on. Broadly, the media has three roles: to provide information, entertainment and leadership. The first two are the traditional roles. Even there, one must have a sense of proportion. How is the Indian media justified in mostly showing glamour, pop music and half-naked women in a poor country? There is cricket day in and day out on television. Cricket is really the opium of the Indian masses. During the India-Pakistan match at Mohali in March last year, the media hyped it up as if a Mahabharat war was on. Had I not spoken out, the birth of a film star’s child would have been on the front page of every newspaper. When Dev Anand died, it became front page headlines in several leading newspapers and I raised my voice against it since 250,000 farmers in India committed suicide in the last 15 years but this was hardly published anywhere except by P. Sainath of The Hindu.advertisementHow is Kareena Kapoor or Lady Gaga or Formula 1 or Sunny Leone important for the Indian masses? Does a hungry or unemployed man want entertainment or food and a job?Markandey Katju, PCI chairmanThis is a poor country with 80 per cent in terrible poverty. There is massive unemployment, sky-rocketing prices, massive problems of healthcare, education, housing etc. In rural areas, things are very bad. Every day on an average, 47 farmers committed suicide for the last 15 years. Millions of farmers have fled to the cities and lost their livelihoods. Unlike in Europe during the Industrial Revolution, where the displaced peasantry got jobs in the newly arisen factories, there are few jobs here since manufacturing is on the decline. Factories are becoming real-estate. It reminds one of John Steinbeck’s novel Grapes of Wrath. There are striking similarities between the ‘Okies’ of the American Great Depression who lost their livelihood and farmers committing suicide in Vidarbha. But the media largely diverts attention from these real issues. How is Kareena Kapoor or Lady Gaga or Formula 1 or Sunny Leone important for the Indian masses? Does a hungry or unemployed man want entertainment or food and a job? Q: What if there is a public demand for these?A: I met the proprietor of an Indian English magazine. He told me that he was a businessman, and would publish whatever the public wants, as long as the laws of obscenity or defamation are not flouted. I told him, you are not in a business of selling commodities. The media deals with ideas. Should you descend to the low intellectual level of the masses and perpetuate that mindset? The problem is, 90 per cent Indians are very backward, of poor intellectual level, full of casteism, communalism and superstition. When people vote, do they see the intellectual merit of the candidate? Ninety per cent of votes go on the basis of caste and religion. Why else would bandit queen Phoolan Devi be elected? Despite killing scores of people, she won on the strength of her Backward Caste identity.Q: If 90 per cent of Indians have low mental abilities wouldn’t the media reflect that?A: The media should uplift the mental level of the masses, not descend to that low level. I am not trying to harm the media. In fact, I want the media to play a great historical role-like the European media played in the 17th to 19th centuries, during the Age of Enlightenment. Have you read Thomas Paine’s Common Sense and Rights of Man? The first was about the American Revolution and the second about Edmund Burke’s criticism of the French Revolution. Superb treatises. I want the media to rise to that level.Q: But should one go back in time to find role models from another culture? A: There is nothing wrong in learning from historical examples. Like the heroes of that age-Voltaire, Rousseau, Thomas Paine, Diderot or Helvetius-I want today’s Indian journalists to play a crucial role in transforming Indian society from feudalism into a new age of enlightenment, characterised by reason, science and humanity. This is the “leadership” angle I talked about at a lecture at the Bengal Club in Kolkata on December 5 last year. The traditional roles of the media are two: providing information and entertainment. In the transitional age, there is a third role: that is, giving leadership to the people in the realm of ideas. Media persons, however, can play a great role in this connection only if you correct yourselves. You can show the way and give leadership to the nation, provided you make yourself fit to do so. Q: How exactly do you think journalists need to correct themselves?A: First of all, you have to get all your facts right through careful investigation and committed research. But you have also to read social sciences like economic theory (since the world is going through the Second Great Depression. The first was between 1929-39); history, to know how other countries solved their problems; literature, to learn how to entertain as well as educate; and Urdu poetry, because the voice of the heart comes out here more than anywhere else. And then you can help the society to grow and prosper. advertisementQ: But even Europe saw the parallel growth of cheap vulgar press that ultimately gave birth to today’s tabloid journalism…A: I am not talking of those. And I am not talking of the present European media but that between the 17th and 19th centuries, the historical period when Europe went through its transformation from feudalism to modern society. Transition in history is a terribly painful period, full of wars, turmoil, turbulence, revolutions, chaos and intellectual ferment. Only after going through that fire did modern society emerge in Europe. India is presently going through a similar fire, and my guess is, it will last for another 15-20 years. Here the media becomes extremely important because ideas become a powerful force in an age of transition. You people have a great, historical role to play, and if you do it correctly you will win the applause and respect of the Indian people. Q: What sort of role do you have in mind for the media?A: If you promote rational, scientific and modern ideas, you will help people get over this transition period faster, with lesser pain. You cannot totally eliminate the pain but you can reduce it, and shorten the transition. We must become a modern, industrial state. That should be our national aim. Modern industries will generate the wealth needed for social upliftment. But we must also think of the rural society. In India, unfortunately the whole policy of the government is to benefit a small section of the urban people. As a result, farmer suicides are going on. There are 49 ‘dollar billionaires’ in India, and the 10 richest Indians earn $350,000-$700,000 per minute. Four of the top 10 richest people in the world are Indians. On the other hand, 80 per cent of people in the country are living at Rs 20 a day or less. About 47 per cent of Indian children are malnourished, which is 10 per cent higher than that in Ethiopia and Somalia-the poorest countries in Africa. We stand 66th among 88 hungry nations but we write off $70 billion annually as tax cuts for the rich. The divide between the rich and the poor in the last 20 years has crossed all limits. This is not acceptable. The media must highlight all these. But you are highlighting fashion, film stars, cricket and other superficial things. Q: Don’t you think the media also highlights politics and politicians?A: I would prefer media to highlight real issues, which are socio-economic. You hardly have any agricultural or labour correspondents, and this shuts you out from over 75 per cent of society. But you highlight Dev Anand’s death on front page as if it is the greatest catastrophe. I also watch Dev Anand’s films for entertainment. But he is not a great historical hero. If you think Dev Anand is a real hero, you have a poor intellectual level. In public speeches, I openly say, 90 per cent of you Indians are of a poor intellectual level. And yet surprisingly 90 per cent of Indian people love me. Why? Because they know that I am criticising them for their benefit, not to harm them. Today people in this country are looking for guidance from genuinely patriotic people. I want Indians to have better lives. I want them to prosper. I want poverty and unemployment to be abolished. And all patriotic people including the media should want that.Q: Is this your impression of journalists? That they are not respected?A: Listen. Please don’t ask me. Ask 100 people at random without disclosing that you are a journalist and you will find out. You may be shocked to hear their views. Madhu Kishwar said on Rajya Sabha TV that most journalists are bribable and manipulable. But, I believe, there are many honourable journalists, too.Q: You have made an appeal that the Bharat Ratna award should go to Ghalib, Sarat Chandra and Subramanya Bharathi. Are you aware that Sarat Chandra had written very negative comments about Muslims? A: Sarat Chandra had given a speech in 1926 against Muslims, which I totally disapprove of. But in Palli Samaj, he praised Muslims. In Chapter 12 of this book it is mentioned (1) whereas in caste-ridden Hindu society people fight with each other, among Muslims if someone is in difficulty others get together and help him. (2) One rich Muslim Jafar ill-treated his step-mother and the Muslim community boycotted him, whereas Govind Ganguly beat up his widowed sister-in-law but no one intervened. (3) The Muslims of village Veerpur came to their Zamindar Ramesh and wanted their own school because Muslim children were refused admission in the local school. So, you see, nobody is perfect. In his writings Sarat Chandra launched a powerful attack against injustice, women’s oppression, caste system and superstitions. So let us not be too critical about a person just because he has some defect. We have to make an over-all assessment of a writer by studying all his works, and not just one speech. Q: Instead of Press Council you wanted an umbrella body, a Media Council, that would include electronic media and the Internet. Could you tell us something about it? A: Look, first of all I have to say that people misunderstood me. I am a very democratic person. In my judicial career, I have given very strong judgements supporting freedom. Unless you have freedom, ideas cannot grow and, in a transition period, ideas are very important. At the same time, no freedom can be absolute. Every freedom must come with responsibilities. Electronic media particularly, has been placing emphasis on non-issues-film stars, cricket, and so on. Q: Can’t an artist or a sport person be a hero? Isn’t Sachin Tendulkar a great inspiration to generations of young Indians?A: Not for me. For me, heroes are those who have sacrificed to take the country forward in history, those who help abolishing poverty and other social evils. What inspiration? Cricket is the opium of the masses, to keep people drugged so that they don’t revolt against the horrible condition in which they are living. The Roman emperors used to say, if you can’t give people bread give them circuses. Here it is cricket. Keep people involved in non-issues so they can forget about poverty, price rise and unemployment. Tendulkar is a good cricketer no doubt, but how is he socially relevant? Is poverty abolished because of his century? Or has his career raised the standard of living of the people of India? That you can do by abolishing communalism, superstition, casteism, and by spreading scientific, rational and humane ideas. Entertainment for a little while is okay. But the thrust of the media’s coverage should be socio-economic issues. Instead, you give pages to Munni badnaam hui darling tere liye or Sheela ki jawani. This is your intellectual level. What to do? That’s when I decided to speak up.Q: You have been criticised as someone trying to curtail media freedom. How do you respond to that? A: When someone tries to rectify the market-driven media, the media owners scream and take refuge in Article 19 (1) (a) of the Constitution (Freedom of Speech). They raise an alarm when anyone questions their irresponsible sensationalised views being peddled as news. The middle class Indians are easily swayed by the peripheral issues the media raises (which are really non-issues, like lives of film stars, cricket, pop music, reality shows, etc) which they dish out with propagandist zeal. When I raise my voice against this, I am branded as a dictator who wants to crush media freedom, someone who wants to impose Emergency. But I am the strongest advocate of freedom. I am in favour of calling over media persons who do wrong things and discuss with them the responsible roles they should play. Harsh measures should be adopted only in very, very rare cases. I saw the social media that Kapil Sibal criticised. I have nothing to do with Sibal since I am not into politics, but I took a look at them and they were obnoxious, filthy, pornographic material, showing some religious figures having sex with animals that are considered filthy in that religion, such animals sitting on top of their most holy places etc. Now, if this is shown there may be communal riots. We must no doubt be tolerant. We must show respect to all. But why should mischievous persons have the freedom to show this. Should we have communal riots? These are inflammatory, outrageous material. And I gave my opinion that they should be filtered out.Q: There have been talks of self-regulation of the media. What’s your take on that? A: Listen, self-regulation is no regulation. It’s all empty talk. You know, in 2009, the News Broadcasters Association (NBA) tried self-regulation. They imposed some fine on Rajat Sharma’s Hindi news channel, India TV. He walked out and then they requested him to come back. After that, has there been a single punishment? Then what self-regulation are we talking of? Every day I see many channels showing astrology or some such nonsense, half-clad women, film stars, cricket and so on.Q: So you think a stronger press council would help? A: I had suggested that the Press Council be given more teeth. The Press Council Act was made several decades back when electronic media wasn’t even born. It should be brought in now. It’s not as if the Chairman is alone in the Press Council. We have representatives from the press, journalists, proprietors, MPs, one member from Bar Council of India, one from the UGC and so on. If the electronic media comes under its purview, it will become a Media Council with representatives of the media on it. It’s not as if I alone can act as a dictator or something. I have to carry the majority with me. In the last meeting of the Press Council some of my proposals were accepted by the majority, while others were rejected. I, too, accept whatever the majority decides. So where is the problem? But the power to punish must be there. Right now the Press Council has only the power to admonish and censor, which is almost nothing. So I wrote to the Prime Minister, requesting that the Press Council of India Act be amended to include the electronic media, and that the Council be given more teeth-to be exercised only in exceptional and rare cases. Q: What exactly do you mean by “more teeth”? A: We should have power to fine, power to cut off government advertisements, and in extreme situations when repeated warnings fail, we should have the power to suspend license. Suppose a media entity keeps fanning communal hatred, and despite several requests does not cease to do so, we should suspend its license, at least till they come to their senses. Some checks must be there. As Tulsidas said in Ramcharitmanas, “Bin bhay hot na preet” (without fear there is no love and affection). Every freedom is subject to reasonable restrictions in the public interest. Classical example was given by Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, the legendary judge of the US Supreme Court, when he said you don’t have the freedom to falsely shout fire in a crowded cinema hall, causing a stampede. Q: Wouldn’t that give the government the right to censor the media? A: I don’t believe that regulation of the media should be done by the Government. It should be done by an independent statutory authority. The Press Council is not under the Government. It is an independent statutory authority. I am not subordinate to the government. In fact, I have often made statements criticising the government. For instance, I have criticised the Congress Government of Maharashtra for not protecting journalists. I have called the award of Rs 100 crore in damages in a civil defamation suit against TV channel Times Now a shockingly disproportionate order. I have also pulled up the Government for delaying payment of advertising bills for years on end. Media people must realise that I am not their enemy.advertisementQ: Would you say that journalists come off worse compared to, say, judges?A: I wouldn’t say so. There are good and bad people everywhere. There are also good and bad judges.last_img read more

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U.S. U-17s poised for big World Cup

first_imgUnited States U17 Josh Sargent-led U.S. U-17s look to break trend of disappointing World Cup performances Ives Galarcep @soccerbyives 12:05 10/6/17 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) Josh Sargent USA Under 17 CONCACAF 05032017 Rodrigo Arangua United States U17 U17 World Cup Hype around U.S. U-17 national teams has become a tradition, along with those teams failing to meet expectations. Can the 2017 edition change that? In what has become a tradition over the better part of the past two decades, the U.S. Under-17 national team has become a program that almost always generates excitement among American fans who fall for the inevitable hype that builds around the next generation of talent.The 2017 edition of the U.S. U-17s is no different, with plenty of lofty expectations heading into their World Cup, which begins on Friday against host India. They’ll be hoping to buck what has become a trend of American U-17 teams failing to meet expectations. There have been some good showings at past World Cups, most memorably the Landon Donovan-led 1999 team finishing fourth and the Freddy Adu-led squad in 2003 that played attractive soccer on the way to a fifth-place finish.The teams since have largely disappointed, with the most recent edition, a Christian Pulisic-led side, failing to advance out of its group despite boasting the playmaker who now leads the U.S. senior team’s attack just two years later. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Why Barcelona god Messi will never be worshipped in the same way in Argentina Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. U.S. coach John Hackworth believes his current squad has the qualities to not only meet expectations, but exceed them.”Our team, relative to all the teams I’ve had in the past, this team has been — on a pure level of soccer — as good or better than so many of our opponents,” Hackworth told Goal. “Our reality used to be if we played a top team, a Brazil or Argentina or France or whoever it was, we probably weren’t standing toe-to-toe with them in terms of soccer regards. That was just the reality of it. Now, you see in our build-up, we have quality technically and tactically, and depth at several positions.”I don’t want to be overly confident, but I believe that now we can play with anybody,” Hackworth said. “Now it’s more a matter of us executing.”The Americans are led by U.S. Under-20 World Cup standout Josh Sargent, who finished second in goals scored at the Under-20 World Cup and enters the Under-17 World Cup as one of the players to watch. Not since Freddy Adu has an American entered the Under-17 World Cup with so much hype, and now that he has been fitted with the label of “The next Christian Pulisic”, the soon-to-be Werder Bremen forward will be sure to face plenty of attention from opposing defenses.Sargent won’t be alone though, as this U.S. squad boasts a dangerous attack capable of punishing teams that pay too much attention to the U.S. star striker. This U.S. team features more current professionals than any U.S. U-17 team before it, and a collection of players who have honed their games playing first team soccer.”There is a big difference when you get guys that can go in and play on a senior level, like Josh (Sargent) has and Andrew Carleton and Chris Goslin have,” Hackworth said. “There is a speed and a physicality to the game that you can’t replicate in residency, or the youth level. You have to be up there with men doing it, and now that we have so many guys doing that it’s a huge plus for us.”The U.S. U-17 side showed what it is capable at the CONCACAF Championships, where it steamrolled through the competition before losing a wild final to Mexico in a match the Americans appeared to have won before a late Mexico goals paved the way for a stunning loss.As devastating as that defeat was, it has served to offer motivation and a valuable lesson heading into the World Cup.GFX Projected US U17 Team“There was a lesson, yes,” Hackworth said. “We set out to accomplish something, and we thought we had it, and literally in the last second we lost it. That stings. I know the players talk about it, our staff talks about it, and we see this (World Cup) as our opportunity to right that wrong, if you will. I don’t think we need to talk about it as motivation. It just is (motivation). We want to go prove ourselves again.”The Americans are in a tricky World Cup group that features perennial youth powers Ghana and Colombia, as well as host country India, which is the underdog of the group, but is also a team that will have the home support.“It’s not easy to play the host nation in the opener,” Hackworth said. “They’re talking about the prime minister being there, and it being a full stadium. The preparation and investment that they’ve put into the U-17 team is impressive. We played them before, and had a fairly easy result in terms of the scoreline, but it was one of the hardest-working teams we’ve ever played against.”That hard-working mentality from India has the U.S. U-17 coach not taking anything for granted. “We should probably be the favorite against India, but anything can happens in an opening game,” Hackworth told Goal. “We’re confident that we will manage it to the best of our abilities. We’re not looking past the group, but we’re confident that hopefully we can get through it and get to the knockout phase.”U.S. UNDER-17 WORLD CUP OUTLOOKJosh Sargent will draw the bulk of attention, but the space he should create by drawing defenders could pave the way for players such as Ayo Akinola (Toronto FC Academy), Andrew Carleton (Atlanta United) and Timothy Weah (Paris St. Germain) to thrive in the attack.—Weah wasn’t a starter in qualifying but has made great strides, and while he will surely draw attention for being the son of the great Liberian legend George Weah, Timothy could be a breakout player in the tournament—Hackworth could choose to deploy Carleton in a playmaker role to make room in the starting lineup for Weah on the wing, though George Acosta has established himself as a solid creator.—The biggest question mark in the squad is in central defense, where Chris Durkin (D.C. United) and James Sands (New York City FC) have been deployed despite center back not being either player’s position on the professional level. Size and speed are issues for the American center back tandem, and teams with powerful and fast forwards could present some problems.—If there’s a player who could surprise and take the spotlight from Sargent, it is the powerfully-built and dangerous forward Ayo Akinola, who is tough to stop in the final third.—Some relative new faces in the squad who could emerge at the World Cup are Ajax defender Sergino Dest, who can play anywhere along the back line, and Monterrey forward Jacobo Reyes.last_img read more

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Novak Djokovic’s 4-year-old son had a simple message for him: Make sure you win

first_img Rohan Sen MelbourneJanuary 25, 2019UPDATED: January 25, 2019 17:01 IST Novak Djokovic applauded his opponent Lucas Pouille and said the Frenchman has a bright future (AP Photo)HIGHLIGHTSNovak Djokovic will now face Rafael Nadal in the men’s singles final on SundayThe world No. 1 has never lost a championship match at Melbourne ParkThe Serbian advanced to his record-equalling seventh final at Melbourne Park with this winNovak Djokovic’s son Stefan had a very simple message for his father before the Australian Open men’s singles semi-final – “make sure you win”.And the doting father did exactly that on Friday as he hammered Frenchman Lucas Pouille in straight sets to reach the men’s singles final where he will face his arch-rival Rafael Nadal.The world No. 1 took just over an hour and 20 minutes to dispatch Pouille and register a 6-0, 6-2, 6-2 win in the last-four encounter at the Rod Laver Arena.After the game the Serbian tennis ace revealed the 45-minute conversation he had with his four-year-old son just before the match.”My son was talking about Spiderman – he was acting like a fish and doing different things – he just wished me good luck and said, ‘make sure you win’. We are parents of two angels and for me, this is life,” Djokovic said at the post-match interview on court as the crowd burst out laughing.”Make sure you win.” @DjokerNole’s four-year-old son Stefan’s advice to his dad before he takes to the court. #AusOpen pic.twitter.com/3gcMMezu5S#AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 25, 2019On a more serious note, Djokovic recalled his 2012 Australian Open final against Nadal when the Serb outclassed the Spanish master in a 5-hour and 53-minute marathon. But this year he hopes that the final won’t last that long.”First of all, I would definitely want to buy the ticket for the final. We have slightly different rules this year and I don’t think we will go that far. But it’s once-in-a-lifetime opportunity and I hope the result will be the same for me.”advertisementListen up @DjokerNole has a public service announcement for the 2019 #AusOpen men’s singles final against @RafaelNadal. pic.twitter.com/8gOhMm7Uc2#AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 25, 2019Djokovic also applauded Lucas Pouille and said the Frenchman has a bright future. “It’s one of the best matches for me on this court. Tough one for Lucas but he had a great tournament and I wish him all the best for the rest of the tournament. He has the quality to be a top-10 player.”It was highly unlikely I would be here given (my state of health a year ago).. but I alwyas have a lot of belief in myself,” he added.”It’s definitely one of the best matches I’ve ever had on this court. Definitely.”@DjokerNole #AusOpen pic.twitter.com/8yV0kqLH6B#AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 25, 2019With this win, Djokovic extended his streak of Grand Slam semi-final victories to 10, and advanced to his record-equalling seventh final in Australia. He shares the record for most Australian titles with Roger Federer and Roy Emerson. Djokovic has never lost a championship match at Melbourne Park.The 31-year-old has won the last two majors and simply overwhelmed the No. 28-ranked Pouille, who was playing in the semis at a Grand Slam event for the first time.For sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byrohan sen Tags :Follow Novak DjokovicFollow Stefan DjokovicFollow Australian Open 2019 Next Novak Djokovic’s 4-year-old son had a simple message for him: Make sure you winNovak Djokovic sailed past Lucas Pouille in the men’s singles final to set up a final showdown against Rafael Nadal in the Australian Open 2019 final on Sunday.advertisementlast_img read more

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Selon un rapport étudier à luniversité demeure un bon investissement

first_img Selon une étude de la CESPM rendue publique aujourd’hui, le 18 mai, les diplômés des universités des Maritimes continuent d’obtenir de meilleurs emplois et un salaire plus élevé. Cinq ans après l’obtention de leur diplôme, 73 pour cent des diplômés de 1999 avaient un emploi nécessitant une éducation universitaire ou occupaient un poste de gestion, et leur salaire était de 25 pour cent plus élevé que la moyenne canadienne. Le rapport Cinq ans plus tard : Un sondage auprès des diplômés universitaires des Maritimes de 1999 analyse les résultats d’un groupe de diplômés, deux ans et cinq ans après l’obtention de leur diplôme, et examine la transition vers le marché du travail, ainsi que la dette et la mobilité des diplômés. L’étude indique que la transition des diplômés vers le marché du travail dépend grandement du type de programme qu’ils ont suivi. Les diplômés en sciences et en arts appliqués et des programmes professionnels, dont l’éducation est axée sur une profession ou un emploi précis, ont réussi à se faire une place sur le marché du travail et à la conserver. Cependant, les diplômés de programmes de formation générale en arts et en sciences ont eu de la difficulté à intégrer le marché du travail. « La formation générale en arts et en sciences permet d’acquérir des compétences générales utiles dans différents domaines, affirme Léandre Desjardins, directeur général par intérim de la Commission. Bon nombre de diplômés constatent qu’ils doivent retourner aux études pour augmenter leurs chances de trouver un emploi. D’autres ont toujours eu comme objectif d’obtenir un diplôme d’études supérieures. » Le rapport indique que les études supérieures aident la plupart des diplômés à mieux s’intégrer au marché du travail, même ceux des programmes appliqués et professionnels. En effet, 72 pour cent des étudiants ayant obtenu leur premier diplôme en 1999 étaient de retour aux études en 2004. Par contre, plus on étudie, plus on s’endette. Soixante-treize pour cent des diplômés avaient emprunté pour obtenir leur diplôme de 1999 ou pour la poursuite de leurs études. Il s’agit d’une augmentation de 13 pour cent comparativement à 60 pour cent de ceux qui avait emprunté en 1999. L’emprunt moyen atteignait 28 078 $ en 2004, ce qui représente une augmentation moyenne de 7 000 $ depuis 1999. Le rapport indique également que les diplômés réussissent à rembourser leurs prêts. Cinq ans après l’obtention de leur diplôme, ils avaient réduit leur dette de 53 pour cent. Selon Sam Scully, président du Comité consultatif sur l’information et l’analyse qui supervisait le projet, le rapport indique que la moitié de tous les diplômés ayant obtenu leur premier diplôme universitaire en 1999 n’avaient plus de dette d’études cinq ans plus tard. De plus, le rapport offre certains détails sur la mobilité des diplômés. Il indique que 81 pour cent des diplômés universitaires de 1999 travaillaient dans les Maritimes en 2004, ce qui constitue une baisse de 6 pour cent comparativement à 2001. Le rapport indique également que la plupart des diplômés ayant quitté la région, l’ont fait pour des raisons liées à lemploi. Le sondage de 2004 mené auprès des diplômés universitaires des Maritimes de 1999 est le cinquième sondage du programme de sondage des diplômés de la Commission. Il est accessible sur le site Web de la Commission à www.cespm.ca/francais/pol_b.html . La Commission de l’enseignement supérieur des Provinces maritimes a été créée en 1974 pour aider les établissements et les gouvernements à offrir le meilleur environnement d’apprentissage postecondaire possible. Les 19 membres de la CESPM proviennent des provinces Maritimes et ils représentent des établissements d’enseignement supérieur, des gouvernements provinciaux et le grand public. AUX FINS DE DIFFUSION : Selon une étude de la CESPM rendue publique aujourd’hui (le 18 mai), les diplômés des universités des Maritimes continuent d’obtenir de meilleurs emplois et un salaire plus élevé. Cinq ans après l’obtention de leur diplôme, 73 pour cent des diplômés de 1999 avaient un emploi nécessitant une éducation universitaire et leur salaire était de 37 pour cent plus élevé que la moyenne canadienne. L’étude indique que la transition des diplômés vers le marché du travail dépend grandement du type de programme qu’ils ont suivi. Les diplômés de programmes axés sur une profession ou un emploi précis ont réussi plus facilement à se faire une place sur le marché du travail. Le rapport est accessible sur le site Web de la Commission de l’enseignement supérieur des Provinces maritimes. -30- COMMISSION DE L’ENSEIGNEMENT SUPÉRIEUR DES PROVINCES MARITIMES –Selon un rapport, étudier à l’université demeure un boninvestissementlast_img read more

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Azerbaijan Airlines launches direct flight linking Baku to New Delhi

first_imgNew Delhi: Backed by its core philosophy to provide strong regional network coverage, Azerbaijan Airlines (AZAL), the flag carrier and largest airline of the country of Azerbaijan today scaled yet another new height by launching its direct flight linking Baku to New Delhi. The news comes in the wake of Azerbaijan’s robust customer-friendly strategy to offer greater connectivity from India to Baku, thereby saving time and enhancing comfort for its esteemed passengers. Also Read – An income drop can harm brainWith the launch of this service, flight will be departing from Terminal 3 of the Indira Gandhi International Airport. It will be scheduled every Wednesday and Saturday starting from 26 June, 2019 arriving in Baku at Terminal 1 of the Heydar Aliyev International Airport. Air tickets can be booked online through the offices of AZAL’s official agents. Importantly, tourist visa for Azerbaijan can be obtained online through https://evisa.gov.az/en. In India, Moxie Hospitality India Pvt. Ltd. is the appointed GSA for AZAL. Also Read – Shallu Jindal honoured with Mahatma AwardCommenting on this new milestone, Jamil Manizade, Director of Azerbaijan Airlines remarked, “India ranks very high in our list of priorities. It offers immense potential due to the high number of international travelers and their growing interest in the region. With the launch of the direct route between Baku and New Delhi, we are confident that it would boost the flow of tourists to Azerbaijan. We expect flights to the country to double by October this year.” Detailing further, Jamil Manizade, Director of Azerbaijan Airlines said, “An Eastern country with a Western outlook, Baku is known as the ‘Pearl of the Caucasus’ combines history, culture and modernity. It is a vibrant city offering safe and attractive setting along the Caspian Sea. From UNESCO World Heritage Sites, to phenomenal shopping experiences, outdoor activities, luxury hotels, and beautiful venues and locations for weddings and honeymoons, Azerbaijan is a perfect destination for couples, families, and friends, Azerbaijan offers the perfect landscape for Indian travellers of all kinds.” Hailing this partnership, Geetanjali Alamshah, Founder Director – Moxie Hospitality India Pvt Ltd. said, “We are proud to be partnering with Azerbaijan Airlines on this venture. Our rich legacy and vast experience in hospitality sector along with our dedicated team has put us in good stead. As always, we will delight our privileged customers with seamless and effective service. To this end, we have worked out a robust marketing plan including attractive packages for potential customers.”last_img read more

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Londons Heathrow Airport halts departures for drone report

first_imgLondon’s Heathrow Airport says flight departures have been suspended as a precaution after a reported drone sighting.The suspension of takeoffs from Britain’s busiest airport was announced shortly before 6 p.m. on Tuesday.Airport officials say they are working closely with police to clarify the situation.The report follows the pre-Christmas shutdown of London’s Gatwick Airport for parts of three consecutive days due to reported drone sightings.The Gatwick closure led to more than 100,000 people being stranded or delayed, the worst ever drone-related disruption at an international airport.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Four countries on track to graduate from UN list of least developed

Bhutan, Kiribati, Sao Tome and Principe and the Solomon Islands have increased national earning power and improved access to health care and education, making them eligible to exit the group of least developed countries (LDCs).“This is an historic occasion,” said Jose Antonio Ocampo, chair of the Committee for Development Policy (CDP), noting that only five countries have graduated since the UN established the LDC category in 1971.LDCs are assessed using three criteria: health and education targets; economic vulnerability and gross national income per capita.Countries must meet two of the three criteria at two consecutive triennial reviews of the CDP to be considered for graduation.The Committee will send its recommendations to the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) for endorsement, which will then refer its decision to the UN General Assembly.For CDP member Diane Elson, a professor at the University of Essex in the United Kingdom, Thursday’s announcement was good news for millions of women in rural areas.She pointed out that the latest session of the UN Commission on the Status of Women (CSW), currently under way in New York, is discussing the challenges facing this population.“The success of the countries that are graduating reflects things like the improvement of the health and the education of the population, which extends to rural women, and the increase in incomes in the country, which extends to rural women,” she said.However, Ms. Elson stressed that the countries will need continued international support because they remain vulnerable to external shocks, including the impact of climate change.Mr. Ocampo said this vulnerability is particularly evident in Pacific Island states such as Kiribati. UN Photo/Mark GartenJosé Antonio Ocampo (centre), Chair of the Committee for Development Policy (CDP), along with Committee member Diane Elson (right), briefs journalists as guests at the noon briefing. On the left is Farhan Haq, Deputy Spokesperson for the Secretary-General.Globally, there are 47 LDCs, according to the UN Office of the High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States.The majority, 33, are in Africa, while 13 can be found in the Asia-Pacific region, and one is in Latin America.In the 47 years of the LDC category’s existence, only five countries have graduated (Botswana, Cabo Verde, Equatorial Guinea, Maldives and Samoa)The CDP said two more countries, Vanuatu and Angola, are scheduled for graduation over the next three years.Nepal and Timor-Leste also met the criteria but were not recommended for graduation at this time, due to economic and political challenges.That decision will be deferred to the next CDP triennial review in 2021, according to Mr. Ocampo.Bangladesh, Lao People’s Democratic Republic and Myanmar met the graduation criteria for the first time but would need to do so for a second time to be eligible for consideration. read more

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Scania featuring strong product and service offering at AIMEX

first_imgScania Australia will showcase the wide variety of business solutions it provides for the mining industry – along with its acclaimed  vehicles – on Stand 5220 during AIMEX -September 6-9. The Scania approach is designed to provide maximum availability of assets to mining operators by correctly specifying a vehicle for its intended purpose and supporting this with regular maintenance that ensures factory-trained technicians keep it in tip-top condition, while using only genuine Scania replacement parts.The company offers a remote area servicing option where experienced technicians can be flown to a site to provide routine maintenance, enhancing uptime. It is also working on a plan to fit mobile workshops to the back of its trucks so these facilities can be available on site.Scania supplies mine vehicles in a variety of configurations, from 6×4 and 8×4, to 6×6 and 8×8, including hub-reduction units for use in very arduous terrain. Scania mining trucks are commonly used as water carts, fuel and lubricant service vehicles as well as explosives delivery vehicles. Then there are its heavy haulage road train prime movers that are rated up to 200 t GVM. At AIMEX, Scania will feature a mine service vehicle cab/chassis, the Scania 8×4 G 400 which is suitable for work as a water carrier, fuel or lube service vehicle.Two of the company’s senior executives from Sweden will also attend AIMEX to talk to business partners.Scania cab configurations range from the practical and flexible G-series to the more spacious R-series – voted International Truck of the Year in 2010. Scania provides high torque six-cylinder and V8 engines, which all comply with current emission standards and are exceptionally fuel-efficient.In addition to on-site work trucks, Scania is also expert at crew transport, offering a fully imported crew bus, the Scania-Higer A30, which can seat up to 61 people. Scania crew buses have been chosen by some of thebiggest names in mining in Australia for their durability and reliability in very challenging conditions.Scania also offers stationary engines for power generation and water pumping. These feature a modular design to simplify servicing and increase parts commonality.“Scania has the answer to many mining operators’ questions, with our comprehensive product offer, our wide-ranging and innovative after sales support and our can-do attitude,” says Robert Taylor, Scania General Manager, Mining Products. “If there’s something a mining operator wants that we don’t already supply, we’ll work with them to find solutions towards fulfilling that need.”Scania mine vehicles are used on mining sites all over the world, including South America, Southeast Asia and South Africa, as well as in Australia.last_img read more

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Firefox 19 finally delivers builtin PDF viewer brings themes to Android version

first_imgMozilla’s excited about the fact that Firefox 19 has finally brought a built-in PDF viewer to its browsers’ stable release channel. But while the Foundation zeroes in on how PDF.js lets Firefox users “browse the Web without interruption,” there’s a much bigger benefit than convenience. With an integrated PDF viewer now available in Firefox, there are now hundreds of millions of additional web surfers who don’t need to rely on spearphishing phavorite Adobe Reader.PDF.js was almost ready to go in time for the release of Firefox 18, but Mozilla left the viewer disabled by default. Now that the switch has been flipped, of course, the opposite is true: you can jump over to about:config if you’d like to leave the built-in PDF viewer disabled and ignore Acrobat files on the web altogether — or view them using the Adobe Reader plug-in if you like to live dangerously. There aren’t any other user-facing changes that are really noticeable, though Firefox 19 startup times have been reduced.Firefox for Android has been upgraded, too. Among the additions are support for Mozilla’s lightweight themes (formerly known as Personas, but that branding is now being reserved for the in-browser identity project). There’s not much interface there to cover up anyway, but it’s always nice to added control over how your browser looks and functions. The bar for entry has been lowered in Firefox 19, too.With the new stable version, any device that runs a processor 600MHz or faster can now enjoy Mozilla’s mobile browser.last_img read more

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Students compete in national games

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram Over 400 students from seven Greek-Orthodox colleges all over Australia met this week at Sydney’s daily bilingual college of St Spyridon, to take part in the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of Australia National Schools Event 2014. Students of St Andrew’s Grammar School (Perth), St George College (Adelaide), St John’s College, Oakleigh Grammar (Melbourne), All Saints Grammar and St Euphemia College (Sydney) were hosted by their St Spyridon College peers for a three days event, where they took part in a range of sports and arts competitions.St Spyridon College director, Ms Euphrosyne Stephanou told Neos Kosmos it has been an honour for the College to be the proud host of the games that have been taking place every year since 1996.“Seven Archdiocese schools converged here for a three day National Schools Event. There are 400 students, and this event is something that every student during their time in our schools look forward to as a highlight,” Ms Stephanou said. As part of sport activities, students competed in basketball, netball, indoor soccer, soccer, table tennis and volleyball. On Thursday night, St Spyridon College held a special dinner in honour of all the participants. During the night, an Arts Festival was held, with students performing in Greek, Serbian, Italian and English, and showing off their skills in dance and instrumental music. “We try and keep faithful to our Olympic ideals, and there were never Olympic Games held in Greece unless there was also a cultural performing arts program attached to it. So we keep the faith with tradition which goes back 5,000 years,” Ms Stephanou told Neos Kosmos. On Friday, an award ceremony was held, and medals were presented to all winners for their achievements.“This event started in a very small way in 1996, when Mr Peter Meintanis set out on a bus to go to St John’s College to play their first soccer game. “But since 1996 and two teams that took part, the event has grown to 400 students with many teams across many sports,” Ms Stephanou told Neos Kosmos. “I have been in Orthodox education for 18 years now, and in those years never has a Year 12 class graduated without thanking their teachers for the opportunity to be part of this wonderful contest. It’s a highlight for every student of each of our schools. “For us it was a great honour to be hosting it, and a great responsibility, and we are looking forward to being hosted by Sydney’s St Euphemia College next year,” she said.last_img read more

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Des dizaines de milliers dotaries massacrées chaque année en Namibie

first_imgDes dizaines de milliers d’otaries massacrées chaque année en NamibieComme chaque année, la Namibie se prépare à abattre cet été des milliers d’otaries avec une extrême cruauté. Une pratique traditionnelle dont on parle peu, alors qu’elle est le plus violent des massacres d’animaux marins menés à travers le monde.Sur son site Internet, l’association Sea Sheperd, à l’origine de nombreuses actions en faveur de la protection des animaux marins et notamment des baleines, pousse un cri d’alerte quant au massacre qui se prépare en Namibie, comme tous les ans. Dans quatre mois, ce sont 91.000 otaries à fourrure d’Afrique du Sud, 85.000 bébés et 6.000 mâles, qui seront battues à mort dans le pays. Une pratique monstrueuse qui chaque année, tue encore plus d’otaries que le massacre des bébés phoques au Canada.À lire aussiCes 18 animaux méconnus à l’aspect étonnant pourraient disparaître avant vousL’association canadienne raconte l’insoutenable rituel : les bébés sont séparés de leurs mères, et sont encerclés avec les mâles, avant que des hommes armés de bâtons ne viennent les battre à mort. “Le sable de la plage sera rouge sang, et les corps ensanglantés seront jetés à l’arrière des véhicules attendant non loin de là. Peu après, des bulldozers arriveront pour nettoyer et remettre la plage en état avant que les touristes n’arrivent pour observer la colonie, car tout ceci se passe dans une réserve naturelle pour les otaries”, s’insurge Sea Sheperd. Ce massacre est mené par un seul homme, Hatem Yavuz, explique l’association. Chaque année, et ce jusqu’en 2019, il bénéficie d’une exclusivité d’achat sur la peau de chaque otarie tuée. Des fourrures qu’il achète sept dollars l’unité, pour vendre des manteaux dont le prix peut atteindre quelque 30.000 dollars. Espèce menacée par la perte de son habitat naturel, la pêche industrielle, mais aussi la pollution, l’otarie à fourrure d’Afrique du Sud est inscrite à l’annexe II de la Convention sur le commerce international des espèces menacées d’extinction (Cites). Un classement qui signifie que si l’espèce n’est pas actuellement menacée, elle le deviendrait si aucune mesure n’était mise en place pour la protéger. En seulement six ans, entre 1994 et 2000, 300.000 otaries seraient mortes de faim. Le nombre de naissances ne cesse de diminuer, et serait passé de 164.248 en 1993, à 107.910 en 2006.Le 3 avril 2011 à 17:58 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

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SXSW 2012 musique technologie et cinéma réunis au Texas

first_imgSXSW 2012 : musique, technologie et cinéma réunis au Texas Cette année encore, la musique, le cinéma et la technologie se donnent rendez-vous au Festival South By Southwest (SXSW). Musiciens et technophiles en tous genres se rejoignent à Austin, la capitale du Texas du 9 au 18 mars 2012.Cette semaine, Austin se trouve à la croisée des chemins de la musique et de la technologie. Le festival SXSW, lancé en 1989, connu à l’origine pour sa scène musical, a petit à petit évolué en une sorte d’aimant à petites et grandes entreprises technologiques.Technophiles, acteurs, musiciens, réalisateurs, développeurs ont tous en commun la volonté d’être la prochaine nouveauté du moment dans leurs domaines respectifs. Robert Scoble, blogger, précise que “chacun vient pour decouvrir les dernières nouveautés, car il y a de nombreuses influences à Austin” rapporte le Tucson Citizen.La partie musicale du festival (SXSW Music), qui dure six jours, devrait voir la participation de nombreuses stars comme Bruce Springsteen, Jay-Z, 50 Cent, Norah Jones ou Lionel Richie. De son côté, la partie cinéma (SXSW Film), qui représente neuf jours sur dix, devrait attirer Leonardo DiCaprio, Matthew McConaughey, Tobey Maguire ou encore Jack Black.Mais le volet nouvelles technologies (SXSW Interactive), qui dure cinq jours sur dix, ne devrait pas être en reste. Tina Wells, PDG du groupe Buzz Marketing, qui collabore régulièrement avec Dell explique que “le festival rassemble, littéralement, une grande partie des personnes les plus intelligentes et les plus riches du monde. Elles viennent ici justement car elles sont très ouvertes à une forte créativité”.  Pour les entreprises, c’est l’endroit idéal pour rencontrer de nouveaux clients. D’autant plus que l’ambiance est beaucoup plus relâchée que dans des grands salons comme le Consumer Electronics Show, dû à l’aspect multifacettes du festival.De nombreuses nouveautés et annonces ont déjà fait le buzz au SXSW. Citons, par exemple, Marvel Comics qui a annoncé une application permettant de profiter de la réalité augmenté dans vos comics préférés. Ou encore Glancee. Cette application combine localisation et goûts et vous permet de connaître quels sujets de conversations sont susceptibles de plaire à la personne à côté de vous. Hugh Forrest, directeur du SXSW Interactive explique que “l’idée général du marketing social ambiant, c’est que votre téléphone est capable de vous dire si la personne à côté de vous est un fan des Yankees, et si vous l’êtes vous-même, alors c’est le moment d’engager la conversation”.À lire aussiDengue : symptômes, traitement, prévention, où en est-on ?Anthony DeCurtis, rédacteur adjoint de Rolling Stone explique “qu’il y a une sorte de chevauchement, tout semble émerger au même moment. Donc, les limites entre chaque secteur sont bien plus floues qu’avant. Du coup, autant tout rassembler au même endroit, comme c’est le cas au SXSW”. Rachel Ray, organisatrice d’un mini-festival, au sein même du festival, avoue “qu’il est très difficile de garder les programmes secrets, car tout le monde est connecté pendant le festival. Mais c’est ce qui fait son charme” rapporte le Tucson Citizen.Plus de 50.000 personnes sont attendues à Austin, pendant 10 jours et pas uniquement pour le climat plutôt doux ou la nourriture Tex-Mex… Le 12 mars 2012 à 16:26 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

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1121 WWE RAW Preview Fallout from the Survivor Series PPV New Day

first_img Comments are closed. Jason Namako RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Pinterest Joan Jett Set To Perform Ronda Rouseys Entrance At WrestleMania 35 Ronda Rousey On WWE: I Love This Job, But I Dont Need It Intercontinental and Smackdown Tag Team Championship matches added to Clash of Champions Videos Articles Now Playing Up Next WWE Monday Night RAW is live tonight from Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Tonight is the fallout from last night’s Survivor Series PPV. The only thing set for the show tonight is RAW Tag Team Champions The New Day defending the RAW Tag Team Titles against Cesaro and Sheamus.Wrestleview.com will have live coverage of RAW tonight beginning at 8PM ET.Recommended videosPowered by AnyClipSeth Rollins Defends WWE On Two Separate OccasionsVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPauseUnmuteDuration 0:30/Current Time 0:04Loaded: 100.00%0:04Remaining Time -0:26 FullscreenUp NextThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Replay the list Now Playing Up Next Now Playing Up Next Now Playing Up Next WhatsApp Google+ 1 COMMENT Roman Reigns is in Remission Ronda Rousey Highlighting WWEs Problems Videos Articles Seth Rollins and Braun Strowman win the RAW Tag Team Championships Kurt Angle Well, I want to see Paul Heyman and Brock Lesnar…especially Heyman running his mouth and defending Lesnar. A great scene to see.Heyman was a non stop running mouth “BROCK LESNAR ended the streak.1 in 21” every night after Undertaker’s streak ended…I would love someone to say “BROCK LESNAR lost to GOLDBERG 2 times in a row and in 1 min and 26 sec.”. November 21, 2016 at 10:41 am Cesaro Cesaro announces that he will make an appearance at NXT UK TakeOver: Cardiff Now Playing Up Next Seth Rollins Lakhan Twitter Videos Articles Seth Rollins Defends WWE On Two Separate Occasionslast_img read more

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Video shows thief stealing pickup truck outside NW MiamiDade Walmart

first_imgNORTHWEST MIAMI-DADE, FLA. (WSVN) – Police are asking for the public’s help as they seek to put the brakes on a truck thief in Northwest Miami-Dade.Newly released surveillance video shows the subject approaching a white Ford F-150 in the parking lot of the Walmart along Northwest 79th Street and 32nd Avenue, July 13.Police said the thief used a tool to break inside the pickup. The security footage shows him driving off in the vehicle.If you have any information on this theft, call Miami-Dade Crime Stoppers at 305-471-TIPS. Remember, you can always remain anonymous, and you may be eligible for a $1,000 reward.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

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Steel Creek Fire Draws Speedy Response

first_imgA new Fairbanks area wildfire drew a major response last night. Alaska Division of Forestry information officer Sam Harrel reports that ground and air resources were tapped to attack the Steel Creek Fire, near mile 4 of Chena Hot Springs Road.Download Audio“We sent several crews out there and also had the quite the air show going — both were working out there, as were the tankers,” Harrel said. “Both were working out there as the evening came on.”Harrel says the fire was burning between the Little Chena River and Chena Hot Springs Road, east of Nordale Road, in a critical management area.  It’s estimated to have burned about 45 acres. Harrel credits the heavy response with reining in the blaze.“We’re fortunate that we’re not real busy yet in this fire season and we had a lot of crews available to get right on this, and the aircraft too,” Harrel said.Harrel says firefighters are mopping up the fire area today. He attributes the Steel Creek Fire to lightning from thunderstorms that rolled through the area yesterday afternoon. He says no other fire starts are known at this point, but could materialize later today.The weather forecast is not looking conducive to wildfire in the Fairbanks area. The Middle Tanana Valley can expect periods of rain tonight and Wednesday.last_img read more

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Houston Cop Who Led Deadly Raid May Have Lied Bill To Mandate

first_img Share Friday, February 15, 2019Top afternoon stories:Gail Delaughter/Houston Public MediaHouston Police Chief Art Acevedo (center) discusses the internal investigation about a January 28 deadly raid in Southeast Houston.Houston Cop Who Led A Deadly Drug Raid May Have Lied About InformantHouston Police Chief Art Acevedo said on Friday the case agent who led a January 28 deadly raid in which five officers were wounded and two people were killed may have lied about a confidential informant.The Houston Chronicle reported that the officers conducting the internal investigation about the raid have not been able to locate the informant that allegedly bought heroin at the house located at 7815 Harding.Although Acevedo didn’t mention the name of the case agent in charge of the operation, the Chronicle reported he is Officer Gerald Goines, based on a warrant affidavit which is part of the internal investigation.According to the warrant, as reported by the Chronicle, Goines named two different informants in two different interviews from his hospital bed. The two informants told investigators they had worked for Goines on other cases, but had no knowledge of the January 28 raid.Goines has worked for HPD for more than 30 years. Acevedo said he will be relieved of duty when he gets out of the hospital and will face criminal charges.Alvaro ‘Al’ Ortiz/Houston Public MediaFlooded street near Cypress Creek in Houston on Aug. 29, 2017, during Hurricane Harvey’s aftermath.Texas Senate Bill Would Require Homeowners To Notify Buyers If House Sits In ReservoirDuring Hurricane Harvey, many Houston homeowners learned for the first time that their homes were built inside a reservoir. Now, a bill by State Senator Joan Huffman could help protect future home buyers from having to learn that lesson the hard way.The bill would make it mandatory for homeowners to disclose to potential buyers whether their house sits in a reservoir or whether it has ever flooded. Daniel Gonzalez, legislative director for Texas Realtors, said it will be the first such change to the seller disclosure notice in more than a quarter century.Gonzalez said the changes will be of little use if the homeowners themselves don’t know – and can’t easily find out – whether their house sits in a reservoir or flood pool.The bill has already been referred to a committee for consideration.Roy Luck/FlickrA bail bonds office in Houston, near Minute Maid Park.Bondsmen Sue Harris County Judges Over Release Of Misdemeanor DefendantsThree Houston bail bond companies have sued Harris County’s 15 misdemeanor judges and Sheriff Ed Gonzalez over a new rule that will release all individuals arrested for a misdemeanor on no-cash bonds, with some exceptions.The new policy, known as Local Rule 9.1, was written by the county’s misdemeanor judges who were elected last November and will start being implemented Saturday, February 16. The lawsuit accuses Gonzalez of being complicit with the judges.Individuals arrested for domestic violence, repeat drunken driving offenses and bond violations would not qualify for automatic release, although they might also qualify for personal recognizance bonds in some cases.Among other arguments, the lawsuit contends the rule effectively denies defendants their constitutional right to bail by removing it as an option. The lawsuit also argues defendants have a right to use the services of a bondsman, when allowed under the Texas constitution and state statute.last_img read more

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Gimlet Announces Scripted Podcast Starring Kristen Wiig and Alia Shawkat Renews StartUp

first_img“Sandra” stars Wiig (“Saturday Night Live,” “Bridesmaids”) as Sandra, billed as “the world’s most intuitive virtual assistant,” and Shawkat (“Search Party,” “Arrested Development”) as a new hire at the company that operates Sandra. All seven episodes will be available on Wednesday, April 18.In the series, Helen Perera (Shawkat) spends her days at Orbital Teledynamics peeking into the lives of Sandra’s users — who don’t know that Sandra (voiced by Wiig) is powered by actual humans, not artificial intelligence. Helen’s own life becomes more unmanageable as she navigates a messy divorce, tries to keep her boss happy, and becomes ensnared in an increasingly unprofessional relationship with a heartbroken Sandra power-user named Tad.Cast of the show also includes Christopher Abbott (“Girls”), Avi Rothman (“Love, Sex, and Missed Connections”) and Ethan Hawke (“Boyhood”). “Sandra” was written by Kevin Moffett and Matthew Derby, executive produced by Mimi O’Donnell, Gimlet’s head of scripted fiction. The presenting sponsors of the show are HPE, Casper, Mozilla and Audible.“StartUp” season 7 premieres April 27, with six episodes profiling Backstage Capital’s Arlan Hamilton, who has funded more than 50 entrepreneurs — all female, LGBT, and people of color. The newest season of “StartUp,” Gimlet’s first podcast, is hosted by Amy Standen.“The Habitat,” with all seven episodes available April 18, looks at the six volunteers participating in a Mars-mission simulation on a remote mountain in Hawaii for one year. Host Lynn Levy has been chronicling the experiment since the beginning, communicating with the crew through audio diaries.“We Came to Win,” timed to hit ahead of this summer’s 2018 FIFA World Cup, debuts with three episodes on April 25 with seven weekly installments to follow. Gimlet’s first sports series looks at matches including the U.S.’s shocking 2002 defeat of Mexico and Argentina star Diego Maradona’s controversial “Hand of God” goal in 1986 against England. “We Came to Win” is hosted by soccer journalist Nando Vila.Gimlet Media, founded in 2014, has raised about $27 million in funding from investors including WPP, Laurene Powell Jobs’ Emerson Collective, Stripes Group, Graham Holdings, Cross Culture Ventures and Betaworks. In January, the company named Jenny Wall, formerly a marketing exec at Hulu and Netflix, as its chief marketing officer. Podcast media company Gimlet Media unveiled a slate of three original series to premiere later in April, including scripted serialized show “Sandra” starring Kristen Wiig and Alia Shawkat.The Brooklyn-based company also renewed docu-series “StartUp” for a seventh season. The two new shows in its nonfiction lineup are: “The Habitat,” exploring the lives of six individuals isolated for one year inside a small dome in Hawaii on a simulated Mars mission; and “We Came to Win,” exploring some of the most famous World Cup soccer matches of all time.In addition, Gimlet Media announced GimletFest, its first live festival featuring creators and talent from its original shows, will run June 16-17 at the BRIC arts and media center in Brooklyn. Tickets for the festival, available at gimletfest.com starting April 25, will cost $25 for individual shows and $200 for an all-access pass. Watch a trailer for Gimlet’s three new shows: Popular on Variety ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15last_img read more

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Decoded Why we hate Hypocrites

first_imgWe dislike hypocrites as their denial of bad behaviour sends false signals, misleading us to think they are virtuous even though they are not, a new study has found.The research shows that people dislike hypocrites more than those who openly admit to engaging in a behaviour that they disapprove of.”People dislike hypocrites because they unfairly use condemnation to gain reputational benefits and appear virtuous at the expense of those who they are condemning – when these reputational benefits are in fact undeserved,” said Jillian Jordan from Yale University in the US. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfIn an online study with 619 participants, researchers presented each participant with four scenarios about characters engaging in possible moral transgressions: a member of a track team using performance-enhancing drugs, a student cheating on a take-home chemistry exam, an employee failing to meet a deadline on a team project and a member of a hiking club who engaged in infidelity.In each scenario, participants read about a conversation involving moral condemnation of a transgression. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe researchers varied whether the condemnation came from a “target character” (who subjects would later evaluate) or somebody else, as well as whether the scenario provided direct information about the target character’s own moral behaviour. Participants then evaluated how trustworthy and likable the target character was, as well as the likelihood that the target character would engage in the transgression.The results showed that participants viewed the target more positively when he or she condemned the bad behaviour in the scenario, but only when they had no information about how the character actually behaved. This suggests that we tend to interpret condemnation as a sign of moral behaviour in the absence of direct information. A second online study showed that condemning bad behaviour conveyed a greater reputational boost for the character than directly stating that they did not engage in the behaviour. Additional data suggest that people dislike hypocrites even more than they dislike liars. Perhaps the most critical piece of evidence for the theory of hypocrisy as false signalling is that people disliked hypocrites more than so-called “honest hypocrites.” The study appears in the journal Psychological Science.last_img read more

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