Category: avdygbta

Koke: It seems as though the media want to get rid of Simeone

first_img 21/12/2016 Atletico Madrid midfiedler Koke has given his backing to manager Diego Simeone.  The Rojiblanco have struggled in recent weeks, losing league games against Real Sociedad, Real Madrid, Sevilla and Villarreal.  On top of that there’s been speculation Simeone may be keen to leave the club in the summer, but Koke says the press are wrong to doubt Simeone’s intentions.  He added: “Our aim is to be third but if we finish higher, all the better.” “The media always asks the same question, if he will continue…it seems as though you want to get rid of Cholo,” he said. “We are well and working hard, we’ve been doing the same things for five years now. CET Sport EN “He has a contract [until 2018] and it seems that his intention is to respect it. “Teams go through spells and we are working hard. We’ve had a fantastic 2016 and we hope 2017 will be even better. Koke did admit that Atletico “need to be more consistent in La Liga” but suggested winning the title is not an aim. Upd. at 13:36 last_img read more

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Dylan puts the word out

first_imgBy ANEEKA SIMONIS NOT many 12-year-olds can say they have written a book. But go-getter Dylan Beaumont, a student at…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

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Spain crush Liechtenstein to close in on World Cup spot

first_imgSpain hammered Liechtenstein 8-0 as Alvaro Morata and Iago Aspas both struck twice to maintain their country’s lead over Italy at the top of World Cup qualifying Group G on Tuesday.The victory in Vaduz took Spain to 22 points from eight games, three ahead of the Italians who beat Israel 1-0 in Tel Aviv thanks to Ciro Immobile’s second-half strike.Julen Lopetegui’s Spain side scored three goals in the first 16 minutes to ensure the rest of the game was a formality against the overwhelmed hosts.Spain beat Liechtenstein by the same score in Lopetegui’s first match in charge last year, and this was another example of the verve and style he has his team playing with.Other scores from Tuesday are:Moldova 0Wales 2Republic of Ireland 0Serbia 1Austria 1Georgia 1Italy 1Israel 0FYR Macedonia 1Albania 1Iceland 2Ukraine 0Kosovo 0Finland 1Turkey 1Croatia 0last_img read more

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Laiser Hill out to defend Metropolitan title

first_img0Shares0000Laiser Hills Aggrey Sajera against Passenga in action.PHOTO/Raymond Makhaya.NAIROBI, Kenya, July 13- Laiser Hill Academy will launch their campaign for a second consecutive Metropolitan Region boys’ football title against Machakos’ Muvuti when the Kenya Secondary School term 2B ball games kick off on Thursday morning at the Nyayo Stadium in Nairobi.Laiser Hill will be counting on their experience playing in the Kajiado County League where they are currently placed third in the 15-team league to push for a second title and coach Antony Kirimi remains confident they can replicate their performance from last year. Speaking to Capital Sport, Kirimi says he expects a stiff challenge and has called on his charges to put their best foot forward from the first game.“Playing in the County League has been of great help for us because we have built cohesion as a team and gained considerable experience and match fitness. I believe this will be vital for us but all the same we expect stiff competition,” Kirimi said.Laiser will not be as strong as they were last year when they beat Upper Hill on post-match penalties to win the Metropolitan title with several of their key players having left.Goalkeeper Samuel Wanjema, who was the shoot-out hero last year, as well as midfielder John Macharia and Alwyn Chamla have all completed school.Macharia has since joined second tier side Kariobangi Sharks while Chamla is in Georgia having signed with FC Saburtalohas.However, the Kajiado champions will be looking on the experience gathered by three of their players who were part of the Harambee Stars under-20 team.Musa Masika, younger brother to Harambee Stars winger Ayub Timbe will be the key figure around Laiser side but they will also have support from Kennedy Owino and David Owino, who were also in John Kamau’s under-20 team.“I am hoping they will have some influence in the team because they have had high level training with top coaches. But our strength has always been on team work and I believe that will be our strong point,” Kirimi added.He expects competition from perennial rivals Upper Hill as well as Machakos side Utithi who were winners of the term 2A under-15 games.Laiser, who have produced some of the country’s finest footballers including Sweden based forward Michael Olunga, will be out seeking revenge with coach and school Principal Peter Orero confident his boys can do it.Kwanthanze 2015 Volleyball champions./PHOTO/Raymond MakhayaCompetition will not only be expected on the football pitch but on the volleyball court as well.Defending champions and perennial winners Kwanthanze, who have dominated over the last five years, will open up their campaign against Kajiado’s Noonkopir while the boys champions Hospital Hill serves off first against Oloitoktok Boys High School.Kwanthanze, the regional, national and East African champions coached by Justine Kigwiri will be hoping to keep their status as the undisputed women’s volleyball champions.Coach Justine Kigwiri though does not expect an easy ride but he keeps faith in his girls for safe passage to the national championships.0Shares0000(Visited 2 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

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Stoke City 2-0 Manchester United: Is this the end for Louis van Gaal?

first_img1 Louis van Gaal can’t bear to watch as Manchester United lose at Stoke With Jose Mourinho lurking in the shadows like the ghost of Christmas future, Louis van Gaal suffered the sort of nightmare afternoon that would give anyone sleepless nights.Since Mourinho was sacked by Chelsea earlier this month, rumours have been rife he will be offered the chance to take charge at Old Trafford, and this latest loss will surely signal the end of Van Gaal’s reign.The Dutchman was under growing pressure going into this early Boxing Day fixture following a run of six games without a win, and he could only watch on in horror from the dugout as his side capitulated in the first half at the Britannia Stadium.Captain Wayne Rooney insisted earlier this week he and his team-mates were ready to fight to save their manager’s job, but his reward for his rallying cry was to be dropped to the bench.And it also appeared his words had a distinctly hollow ring to them because, in the opening 45 minutes at least, Manchester United turned in a performance so lacking in festive spirit Ebenezer Scrooge himself would have been proud of it.They were 2-0 down within 25 minutes, with the opening goal in the ninth minute summing up the shocking lack of confidence running through the squad.Memphis Depay made a dreadful error in trying to head the ball back to David de Gea, failing to take into account the windy conditions at Stoke, and his attempt fell woefully short.Full-back Glen Johnson pounced immediately on the mistake to square for Bojan Krkic and, with De Gea hopelessly stranded, the Spaniard kept his composure to pass the ball into the net despite the close attention of two United defenders.That was the worst possible start for Van Gaal and, before the game was a third old, it had turned even bleaker.This time there could be no blame attached to De Gea or his defenders as Marko Arnautovic smashed an unstoppable 25-yard shot into the net, but the needless handball by Ashley Young that led to the free-kick which saw the ball rebound into Arnautovic’s path could certainly have been avoided.Arnautovic could then have added a third which really would have killed the game off as a contest before the interval, but he fired wide from a good position, but the gaps in the United rearguard were alarming.Van Gaal responded at the break by replacing Depay with Rooney, and it was the England skipper who created the 62nd minute opportunity that would have got United back into the game.He took a ball from Ander Herrera and wriggled to the byline before pulling the ball back for Marouane Fellaini, but the Belgian’s weak finish from eight yards out was brilliantly saved by Jack Butland.Stoke seemed happy to settle for a ‘we hold what we have’ approach in the second half, switching to a more defensive formation but, that Fellaini chance apart, Butland was called into action on only two more occasions to deny Anthony Martial and Juan Mata as a toothless United huffed and puffed.So there was to be no Christmas miracle for Van Gaal, and his critics will be sharpening their pencils as they prepare to write his Old Trafford obituary.Remember, the last time he faced the press he demanded an apology from them before walking out of the media briefing and, although it may have been in the (very recent) past, it’s likely that outburst will come back to haunt him in the present during the post-match inquest into this defeat.As for the future? Well, we’re not expecting a Dickens-style happy ending…last_img read more

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‘We should be third!’ – Bilic critical of refereeing decisions against West Ham

first_imgSlaven Bilic believes West Ham would be third place in the Premier League table were it not for the poor refereeing which has cost his team this season.The Hammers have been on the end of questionable officiating in the last few weeks, arguably dropping points in each of the last three games due to refereeing decisions.A penalty was conceded against Chelsea which cost the Hammers the win, whilst last week Cheikhou Kouyate was wrongly sent off, after which Crystal Palace scored to equalise against the East London side.Today, West Ham suffered again, as Manuel Lanzini had an acceptable goal disallowed for offside in their 3-3 draw with Arsenal.Many believe Bilic’s team deserve to secure a fourth placed finish, but the Croatian boss insists the Hammers would be in third place right now if they had not been cursed by poor officiating.“My opinion is that, based on performances, we should be not fourth, but third in the table,” he said.Considering Bilic’s team have suffered in the past few weeks, he has often spoken about the poor decisions which have cost his team.However, he no longer wishes to dwell on mistakes from referees, as he cannot be objective anymore.Bilic continued: “I’m not objective when it comes to West Ham and the decisions, but I’m trying to be. The fact is when I have to talk about it [refereeing] five weeks in a row I look really close to myself, so this time I’m not going to talk about it.”last_img read more

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Storms delay strawberry crop

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREOregon Ducks football players get stuck on Disney ride during Rose Bowl eventIn 2004, the Ventura County crop was valued at a record $363.6 million when 32.8 million trays were harvested. Last year, there were 38.8 million trays harvested despite rains that did nearly $25 million damage to the crop early in the year. The 2005 crop value might still be a record when final figures come in from the agricultural commissioner later this year, and 2006’s situation could brighten up substantially as well because more acres are planted. In 2004, there were 7,784 acres of strawberries planted in Ventura County for the spring harvest, compared to 8,033 in 2005 and 8,195 this year. “The peak production this year will be delayed, but once the weather starts heating up a bit, we should have a great spurt in production,” Buettner said. Carolyn O’Donnell, spokeswoman for the California Strawberry Commission, said about 16.9 million trays of strawberries had been produced in the Oxnard-Ventura County area by April 8, compared to 18.9 million at the same time last year. In Monterey County, where the strawberry season usually starts by the end of March, there are no berries because of the rain. “The berries we are buying now are coming from Oxnard, and they are pretty tasty,” said O’Donnell, whose office is in the Monterey Bay area. “… The growers know that this weather is going to break and we are going to go on with the season. What’s happening now is just delaying the season. It’s not going to rain forever, we hope. Once it stops raining and the sun comes out, we’re going to have lots of berries.” On the bright side, she said, Southern California growers are getting free water, and the berries might even wind up tasting better. eric.leach@dailynews.com (805) 583-7602160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! OXNARD – The onslaught of late rains in March and April have cut strawberry production in Ventura County by 2 million trays at a time when the harvest would normally be at its highest point of the year. Still, agricultural officials are optimistic that the rains have simply delayed production and that warmer, drier weather will boost the numbers dramatically in time for this year’s California Strawberry Festival next month. “The soil is so moist and so wet it’s difficult to get into the fields to harvest the small amount of fruit we have right now,” said David Buettner, chief deputy agricultural commissioner for Ventura County. “It’s very difficult to get equipment in when we have these constant rains over a long period of time. We really need a couple days respite.” Strawberry production in Ventura County has been high in the past few years, in spite of near-record rains last year. last_img read more

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Hibernian reject Celtic’s £1.5m offer for John McGinn

first_imgMcGinn’s reputation has risen with his performances at Hibernian, where he has become one of the country’s leading midfielders. He has made over 100 appearances for the Edinburgh club, winning the Championship and the Scottish Cup in his time at Easter Road.Hibs have said that they are not looking to sell one of their prized assets but would consider substantial bids. Club chief executive Leeann Dempster said last month: “John’s value to me is in the team. That was his value last year and the year before.“If John doesn’t go in this transfer window then I won’t be disappointed, Neil won’t be disappointed and the supporters won’t be disappointed. Hibernian have rejected a bid for Scotland midfielder John McGinn from Premiership champions Celtic.The Parkhead side’s offer of around £1.5m was quickly knocked back by the Hibs board, who value McGinn substantially higher.McGinn, who moved to Hibs in 2015, has one year left on his contract at Easter Road.The former St Mirren star has been consistently linked with a move to Celtic Park, where his grandfather was chairman. “We don’t live and die by transfer fees, if we were to receive a transfer fee of some significance for a player then that would be welcomed and that is balanced by the effect it would have on the team.“I would be very, very surprised if we aren’t tested by a number of clubs, he (McGinn) is a magnificent young player and you saw that with his performances for Scotland recently.”Head coach Neil Lennon said it would be hard to hold on to McGinn is the right offer came in and the player wanted to leave. “We would like to keep John – but it’s going to be difficult,” he said. “He is a huge asset. He’s the heartbeat of the team.”last_img read more

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Salem Man Arrested for Molesting Clark County Girl

first_imgOn March 18th of this year, a detective from the Indiana State Police Post at Sellersburg was contacted by the Washington County Department of Child Services in reference toa female juvenile from Clark County that reported she had been molested by an older male whom lived in Washington County.After an investigation was completed by the detective an arrest warrant was issued out of a Washington County Court for Amburgey’s arrest, 30, of Highway #160 in Salem, IN. A 30-year-old Salem man turned himself in on Tuesday, April 15 at the Washington County Detention Center for molesting a Clark County girl in March.Joseph Scott Amburgey turned himself into the Washington County Jail Tuesday, April 15 for Child Molesting, A Felony, (Two Counts).last_img read more

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Constitution Hill is a window on a brutal past

first_img“The Hill, as it is fondly known, is an engine of growth and transformation for downtown Johannesburg and a place where residents and visitors can interact in a space that takes the country’s history forward in a respectful but progressive manner,” explains Petal Thring, the chief executive officer of Constitution Hill. (Image: www.mediaclubsouthafrica.com) Melissa Jane Cook• Petal ThringCEOConstitution Hill+27 11 381 3100info@constitutionhill.org.za• ConHill is preferred heritage destination • Experts unpack meaning of human rights memorial • Gandhi’s memory lingers in South Africa• Values, heritage can be learnt here • ConCourt art tells South Africa’s storyConstitution Hill is home to the Constitutional Court, the foundation of all that is democratic in South Africa. It is a reminder to all who visit that dignity, democracy, freedom and equality are entrenched in the Constitution.For decades, South Africa was an international pariah, notorious for its apartheid policies. Today, Constitution Hill, in Braamfontein has undergone a phenomenal transformation, a microcosm of the changes the country as a whole has undergone. Once a place of inhumanity and brutality, it is now a place of justice and learning. A commanding presence, Constitution Hill overlooks Johannesburg and provides a unique perspective on the City of Gold and its rich history. This site is home to the Constitutional Court, Women’s Gaol museum, Number Four museum, and the Old Fort museum.“The Hill, as it is fondly known, is an engine of growth and transformation for downtown Johannesburg and a place where residents and visitors can interact in a space that takes the country’s history forward in a respectful but progressive manner,” explains Petal Thring, the chief executive officer of Constitution Hill.A living museumIt is a living legacy of a very complex, tumultuous past going back to 1892, when the Old Fort was built by the Zuid Afrikaanse Republiek (ZAR), under president Paul Kruger. It was built as a prison, but for a brief period during the South African War, or Anglo Boer War, of 1899 to 1902, it served as a military defence post.In the late 1800s and early 20th century, new buildings were added to the fort-like prison. These included the Natives’ Section and isolation cells known as sections Four and Five, where black male prisoners were held, a Women’s Goal in 1907, and an Awaiting Trial building in the 1920s.Collectively, these buildings were known as the Fort, infamous for its brutal treatment of prisoners. Common criminals and ordinary men and women who had contravened colonial and apartheid legislation were imprisoned here in abhorrent conditions.Old FortBefore it took on its role as apartheid prison, the Old Fort was used to defend the ZAR capital, Pretoria. Kruger’s soldiers walked its ramparts in the war, until the British marched into town in 1900, and took over the structure.The ramparts were built to protect the ZAR from British invasion, as well as intimidate migrant miners and keep an eye on them as they crowded into the village in search of gold. Reverting to a prison after the war, initially only white male prisoners were held here, except for Nelson Mandela, who, before the Rivonia Trial in 1962, was given a bed in the hospital section.It is a living legacy of a very complex, tumultuous past going back to 1892, when the Old Fort was built by the Zuid Afrikaanse Republiek (ZAR), under president Paul Kruger. It was built as a prison, but for a brief period during the South African War, or Anglo Boer War, of 1899 to 1902, it served as a military defence post. (Image: www.constitutionhill.org.za)Women’s JailThe Women’s Jail was a charming, Victorian brick building. A space of such grace, yet it humiliated and brutalised its female prisoners, which included criminals and murderers, as well as anti-apartheid activists. The infamous murderess Daisy de Melker was held here, as were prominent political stalwarts such as Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, Albertina Sisulu and Fatima Meer. The women were particularly vulnerable. An information board in the museum today quotes political activist Barbara Hogan: “I could hear a doctor screaming at her saying, ‘You say your baby is sick, but if you cared about your baby, you would carry a pass.’”Number FourThe sign above the entrance to the Natives’ section, Number Four, is a quote from Mandela: “It is said that no one really knows a nation until one has been inside its jails.”Built to house 997 prisoners, it housed 2 200. Here, thousands of black men were imprisoned and brutalised; yet many survived and defied their jailors. Walking down a dark corridor on to a concrete courtyard on a drizzly, gloomy day gave a minute glimmer into what the prisoners must have felt when they arrived at the frightening Number Four. For many, this was their last journey. During the apartheid era, police would arrive numerous times a day with prisoners, who were given a prisoner number; this number was how they were identified.Detainees were strip-searched and hosed down, in summer or winter, and forced to perform the dehumanising “tausa”. This was a diabolical movement that allowed the prison warders to check whether the inmates were smuggling any weapons or contraband up their rectums. Political prisoner Indres Naidoo describes it: “When performing ‘tausa’ the naked person would leap in the air, spinning around and opening the legs wide while clapping his hands overhead and then in the same moment coming down, making clicking sounds with the mouth and bending his body forward so as to expose his open rectum to the warders’ inspection.”Bob Gosani, a photojournalist, secretly managed to photograph the “tausa” from the top floor of a nurses’ home overlooking the prison.Living conditions at Number Four were excruciating and barbaric. In the food area, where prisoners collected their food from trolleys before moving off to eat in the yard or cells, today food drums display the ghastly prisoners’ menus. African National Congress stalwart Joe Slovo describes the drums in his unfinished autobiography: “The first drum, marked ‘Congress One’, contained cooked chunks of beef or pork for white accused. The ‘Congress Two’ drum, for coloureds and Indian prisoners, contained either porridge or boiled vegetables on top of which floated a few pieces of fatty meat that were most probably from the discarded cut-offs from ‘Congress One’ drum. The ‘Congress Three’ drum (for black prisoners) was always meatless and the contents alternated between a plastic-textured porridge and a mixture of boiled mealies and beans.”There were only eight, eastern style toilets that offered no privacy and were in close proximity to the food area. Writer and political prisoner Alex La Guma wrote: “One of the reasons for my disease [typhoid] is found in this jail. Filth. The mats are filthy, the blankets are filthy, the latrines are filthy, the food is filthy, the utensils are filthy, and the convicts’ clothes are filthy. The latrines overflow and make a stench.”Showers were allowed once a week, but prisoners were often denied a wash for months. The allocated shower time was 30 minutes for the 2 000 prisoners, and the gang members took most of this time. The inmates would then be forced to use the toilet to wash their faces, or would rub soap on themselves and wait for it to rain.The communal cells housed between 60 and 70 prisoners; they were only built for 30 and as a result were overcrowded, dirty and badly ventilated. They were lit by a small window, but ironically, as authorities tried to break the spirit of the prisoners, these communal cells became an area to build courage and discuss resistance. The inmates gave each other strength and sang resistance songs to entertain, comfort and maintain solidarity.As if life inside was not harsh enough, made worse by the hostility of the prison wardens, there was also a hierarchy in the cells. You slept according to status: the gang leaders in the place of most comfort. The bod guards protected them and then the bush, or slaves, were near the toilet. It was a stinking space, where the slaves, the lowest in the cell food chain, were abused. These unsanitary conditions created perfect conditions for diseases, including typhoid and enteric fever.Emakhulukhuthu, an isiZulu word meaning the “deep dark hole”, was reserved for the harshest punishments. These were the isolation cells, where “lunatics, juveniles and those with infectious diseases” were kept. Prisoners here spent 23 hours a day inside, subsisting on a diet of rice water. “They could officially be held here for 30 days but some spent over a year in these cells,” states one of the information boards.Emakhulukhuthu, an isiZulu word meaning the “deep dark hole”, was reserved for the harshest punishments. These were the isolation cells, where “lunatics, juveniles and those with infectious diseases” were kept. (Image: www.constitutionhill.org.za) To pass the time, the inmates were creative and did blanket sculpting. At the end of each week, the prisoner with the most artistic blanket sculpture won a reward. “The conditions here were so depraved that when the prisoners were moved to Diepsloot Prison, known as Sun City, they said it was like moving to a hotel, and was utterly luxurious compared to the horrific conditions they had to previously endure,” said Thring.Number Four is now a stark museum and memorial to the thousands of men who were confined within its walls, deprived of the most rudimentary of human rights. Photographic, audio and video material captures the rich heritage of the site. Artefacts of prison life are also on display, including recreations of the blanket and soap sculptures. It remains as it was when it was closed in 1983.Jailed for fighting for freedomMahatma Gandhi was the first to apply the concept of non-violent civil disobedience in South Africa, against the racial segregation laws of the time. The exhibition in the Old Fort, “Gandhi: prisoner of conscience”, focuses on the years Gandhi spent in Johannesburg, from 1902 until 1914, when he left South Africa at the age of 46.Of his experiences in South Africa, he said: “Truly speaking, it was after I went to South Africa that I became what I am now. My love for South Africa and my concern for her problems are no less than for India.” Mandela is quoted on the walls of the exhibition: “The spirit of Gandhi may well be a key to human survival in the 21st century.”Mahatma Gandhi was the first to apply the concept of non-violent civil disobedience in South Africa, against the racial segregation laws of the time. The exhibition in the Old Fort, “Gandhi: prisoner of conscience”, focuses on the years Gandhi spent in Johannesburg, from 1902 until 1914, when he left South Africa at the age of 46. (Image: www.constitutionhill.org.za) Constitution Hill has witnessed it all: South Africa’s history of injustice, detention and imprisonment, as well as democracy at work. People who passed through the complex include Gandhi, Mandela, Albert Luthuli, Walter Sisulu, Joe Slovo, Ahmed Kathrada, Treason trialists of the late 1950s, and students and schoolchildren from the 1976 Soweto uprising, as well as thousands of others active in the apartheid struggle, alongside common criminals.This multipurpose complex functions as a national symbol of a new South Africa and a public space where South Africans, and others, can debate and define the democratic order and this new world.last_img read more

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