Category: bkvvxtgt

NBA Recap, 8/4/19 – Anthony Davis plays and leads Pelicans to win

first_imgAdvertisement cigNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs3nb69Wingsuit rodeo📽Sindre E229x( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 94buxWould you ever consider trying this?😱rttltCan your students do this? 🌚b2wRoller skating! Powered by Firework The Orlando Magic are back in the Playoffs! They defeated the Celtics 116-108 to end a drought which had spanned over 6 years. Nikola Vucevic, Even Fournier, and Terrence Ross combined for 75 points for Orlando. Meanwhile, Kyrie Irving top-scored for the Celtics with 23 points.Advertisement The Spurs claimed a comfortable 112-90 win over the Cavaliers courtesy of LaMarcus Aldridge. A big fourth quarter powered the Thunder to a 132-126 win over the Minnesota Timberwolves. Russell Westbrook had yet another triple-double, and Karl-Anthony Towns scored 35 points.Advertisement Kemba Walker propelled the Hornets to a 104-91 win over the Detroit Pistons as he scored 31 points. The Nets also made the playoffs courtesy of a 108-96 win over the Indiana Pacers. Meanwhile, the Mavericks defeated the Grizzlies 129-127 in an overtime game.The Bucks won as well, beating the Hawks 115-107. The Rockets claimed a mammoth 149-113 win over the Phoenix Suns as James Harden scored 30 points. The Knicks claimed a rare win, beating the Wizards 113-110. Stephen Curry led the Warriors to a 131-104 win over the Clippers in what was their final home regular season game.Advertisement The Pelicans beat the Kings, and the Blazers won the Nuggets to move closer to them. The Lakers won as well, defeating the Jazz 113-109. That’s all the action from today, visit this space tomorrow for more of the same! Advertisementlast_img read more

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The bowlers lead the way

first_imgWARRAGUL & DISTRICT CRICKET ASSOCIATION DIVISION 1 REVIEW – ROUND 6 (DAY TWO) Hallora’s batsmen will look to get the…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription. By Russell Bennett last_img

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Guyanese fashion icon launches cover of new book

first_imgGuyanese fashion icon, Sonia Noel has recently launched the cover of her new book as a gift to herself for her 47th birth anniversary.MOTHERHOOD – The Mountains and the Valleys will comprise stories based on the highs and lows of motherhood and valuable lessons learnt.Noel’s elder daughter, Mariska Jordan Fiedtkou, who has a six-year-old son, will be contributing a chapter to this new book. Also, Noel’s mother, Claudia John, will be sharing her story through the latest literary work of her eldest child.Noel shared an excerpt from the book on social media and people are already excited. The fashion designer recently concluded a successful motivational tour to 14 cities in the United States of America (USA) as she promoted her last book.The tour started in New York City at the Guyana Consulate in Manhattan where all four books were presented. Living with Intention – Beyond the Runway and the two anthologies WOMEN ACROSS BORDERS were well received.The second stop was New Jersey where Jacqui Phillips – who is a celebrity makeup artist and one of the co-authors of WOMEN ACROSS BORDERS hosted that leg of the event.Some of the other cities and states visited were Cambridge, Malden, Boston, Connecticut, Washington, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Tennessee, Mississippi, New Orleans, Fort Lauderdale, Miami and Orlando.While in Washington, DC, the Guyanese Ambassador was invited to make a presentation on Capitol Hill on the importance of creative sector to the Caribbean.Veteran journalist Francis Quamina Farrier and businessman Gerry Gouveia delivered brief remakes and congratulated Noel for her continued determination. Sonia Noel not only showcased her books but also made a presentation on her literary journey.Apart from the motivational talks, fashion was also featured on the tour. The positive energies permeated the air at every event; and on some occasions the books were sold.Upon her return to Guyana, she is living with intention and living true to the first sentence in the book. Determination, faith, focus, self –discipline and consistency can really make anything a reality.last_img read more

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Let the people decide

first_imgVery soon, Guyanese are expected to be heading to the polls to vote for a political party that will form the Government that they believe will push for the kind of development they wish to see. Citizens will also make their decision on the basis on which political party will more than likely follow the necessary principles and practices in keeping with transparent and accountable governance.But, of course, we all know by now that holding elections in such a time is dependent on whether the Coalition Government would abide, not only with the provisions in the Constitution following its defeat in the recent no-confidence vote, but also with the ruling of the Caribbean Court of Justice. Already two ministers of Government are parading the idea that Guyana is a sovereign and independent state and the CCJ cannot impose elections.It was stated before, and we repeat for emphasis sake: The Constitution is clear as to the actions that must be followed after a no-confidence vote. Article 106 (6) of the Constitution states, “The Cabinet including the President shall resign if the Government is defeated by the vote of a majority of all the elected members of the National Assembly on a vote of confidence.”With the Government’s defeat, the next steps in Clause 7 of Article 106 goes on to state that: “Notwithstanding its defeat, the Government shall remain in office and shall hold an election within three months, or such longer period as the National Assembly shall by resolution supported by not less than two-thirds of the votes of all the elected members of the National Assembly determine, and shall resign after the President takes the oath of office following the election.”The Government had initially accepted the motion, now turned resolution, but subsequently shifted its position. The President and the Leader of the Opposition are expected to meet soon for dialogue and to determine the way forward, taking into consideration that the APNU/AFC Administration has lost the confidence of the majority of the people’s representatives in Parliament.The APNU/AFC Government had stated on numerous occasions before that it is proud of its accomplishments over the past three years. It had provided a long list of ‘achievements’, and boasted about not being afraid to face the electorate again. However, based on its recent actions, it is clear that the Coalition Government is using all avenues to buy time.One would think that if the Government is confident that it has performed creditably since it took the reins of political power, it would be anxious to go to the polls. Any Government that is confident of the way it has performed would call elections to get a renewed mandate from the electorate; more so considering the fact that one of its own members has expressed a loss of confidence in the way the administration governs.That said, once a date is set for national elections, the nation could expect fierce competition between the political parties, as the stakes are high, considering oil is expected to start flowing in 2020. Given the many concerns being raised with respect to the management of the oil sector, the new Government would be expected to take urgent measures to ensure that the revenues which accrue from the sector would not be squandered, but would be used towards building human and institutional capacity, addressing our poor infrastructure, and providing economic security for future generations.Considering the events that have unfolded over the past months, we believe it is in the nation’s best interest if the country were to proceed with new elections, and allow citizens to elect a Government of their choice.last_img read more

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Banking red tape needs to be cut

first_imgDear Editor,My visits to the banks in Guyana are a very frustrating experience. Last week I visited two banks at Water Street. The first bank I reached at about twelve noon. They only had about twelve people in the line but only two persons were working. Just to cash a cheque I took over one hour. I counted nine booths but only two tellers were working. The supervisors just put a blind eye to what was happening while many staff were just walking around doing nothing and gaffing all the time. If all the nine booths were occupied I would have left there in less than ten minutes.I then walked over to another bank only to be greeted with a longer line of about sixty people. It was around 13:30h. I joined the line that was not moving, it was very hot and no one cares if the line was like a stagnant trench full of bushes.I counted eighteen booths but only six staff were working, it seems the others were on a long lunch, but the supervisors doesn’t care to fill those empty booths with any other staff I see just walking around and gaffing. The six staff were working for the twelve that were gone to a very long lunch.All of this incompetence I see at all these major banks in Guyana is caused by very poor administration. The CEO and managers have no respect for our Guyanese citizens who have to stand for hours in these lines. They need to be fired.After two hours I approached the teller with my filled out documents. She told me I need to bring my Passport, Tin Certificate and an expense invoice. I was a bit bothered because I gave them those things not too long ago, only the expense invoice that pertains to the amount of money I earned with my income and expenditure was new to me.I finished my transaction and returned the next day with the documents they required to be greeted with the same long UN-moving line. That process alone took an extra hour with many questions I had to answer.I told their staff that they should have called or write to me requesting those documents long before and not wait until I reached there to be greeted by a ‘’steel wall.’’I was told they are updating all customers’ accounts, all because of the money laundering bill. I have been hearing that for a very long time so I now call on the Minister of Legal affairs to make the stipulations of this bill public when it comes to these banks by having a brochure given to all citizens of this country.My questions are as follows: Why do the banks need two forms of Identifications? Why do they need these things all the time: Proof of Address, Tin Certificate, Job letter or Affidavits, Picture, etc? Why the Gecom ID alone doesn’t work? It seems they don’t trust the ID from Gecom and they don’t accept a driver’s licence as a form of ID.Why can’t these banks write their customers, email them, or send letters, publish on TV or in the papers, of their new requirements?Why wait until customers travel from very far to lose a day’s work for a few documents?What does it say in the Anti-Money Laundering about customers’ requirements for banking?To get a Passport, all I will need a good Birth Certificate and my Gecom ID card. Then I will take those to the immigration with my notarised passport form for a passport. So why the banks just can’t accept the Gecom ID?On the issue of passports, how many lines can there be at passport office now for persons to renew their passports or apply for one? The Passport Office lines gets longer daily because everyone wants to leave here since this new administration came to power, it’s the hard truth we must accept.We have a serious migration problem in this country all because of poor wages and salary and bad administration for the past fifty years. Our economy is at a standstill. This doesn’t bother our political leaders.My next question for the banks: Why is it that no banks in Guyana have toilets and urinals? You wait for hours in lines but there are no washrooms for their customers, it’s so sad. I fully agree with Kissoon when he writes: ‘’Why is Guyana such a stupid place?’’We waste hours and days in long lines for just simple things like a Passport, Birth Certificate, and a bank deposit. We are a nation far behind civilszation where the half-educated have risen to power into many offices they are not qualified to administrate. May God help us.Yours truly,Rev Gideon Cecillast_img read more

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Regional District and Residents want Caribou Recovery Program halted

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Union of B.C. Municipalities published an update from provincial officials in regards to the Southern Mountain Caribou Recovery Program.In the update, the Province says they are taking all reasonable efforts to support the recovery of Southern Mountain Caribou in British Columbia.“The B.C. Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy and Environment Climate Change Canada have been developing an S.11 Bilateral Conservation Agreement under the Species At Risk Act. This S.11 Agreement will contain overarching commitments and meaningful strategies for the recovery of Southern Mountain Caribou in B.C. while minimizing implications to local governments and to the various industry sectors that operate in caribou habitat. The S.11 Agreement is looking to increase efforts for habitat restoration, maternity penning, and minimizing land disturbance, etc.”- Advertisement -The Province also says they have been negotiating a Caribou Recovery Partnership Agreement with the federal government and West Moberly and Saulteau First Nations.This Partnership Agreement will contain conservation and recovery measures specific to the recovery of the Central Group of the Southern Mountain Caribou.According to the Province, they have met face-to-face with local governments, other Indigenous nations, sectors and stakeholders, listening to the concerns of the affected communities.Advertisement The Regional District is demanding that the process is halted until the soci-economic impact the program will have on the communities is assessed.Residents are also concerned with the fear of losing their jobs to the point that they have even started a petition to halt the program.In the petition, started by resident Mike Mulvahill, says they are concerned about the closure of the sawmill in Chetwynd and the impact it will have on the community.Both residents and the Regional District hope the government will halt the program and consult with the affected parties before proceeding any further.You can view the petition here.Advertisement The concern for the communities is that if the Province were to go through with the Caribou Recovery Program, it would threaten the future of the logging industry; an industry that residents rely on heavily for their livelihoods.In the update, it states senior officials with the provincial government have met with the Peace River Regional District twice over the past three weeks, and have provided them with the information they have requested.Although, in a letter responding to the UBCM’s update, the Regional District says that while they have met with the Province several times, they say the part about the government providing them with the requested information is untrue.“While it is true that the Province has met with the Regional District several times in person, or on conference calls, it is not accurate that the PRRD has been provided with all information requested.”Advertisementlast_img read more

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Fan power! Fan reaction as Liverpool perform ticket pricing U-turn

first_img Fan power! Fan reaction as Liverpool perform ticket pricing U-turn – will more clubs follow suit? 1 Liverpool’s owners have performed a U-turn on proposed ticket increases after apologising to fans for getting their plans wrong.An estimated 10,000 fans walked out of Saturday’s Premier League match against Sunderland in the 77th minute to show their opposition to increases next season which included a new £77 match ticket and the club’s first £1,000 season ticket.The protest seemingly worked, shocking principal owner John W Henry and chairman Tom Werner. They responded by announcing a freeze on prices, decategorising matches and making £9 tickets available for all games with an allocation of 10,000 over the whole season.The move has been welcomed by fans of both Liverpool and other clubs, hoping a whole host of other outfits will follow suit.See below!last_img read more

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Bubbling with passion

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREThe joys and headaches of holiday travel: John PhillipsThen it’s back to a discussion of Mexican irrigation rights and the future of the Salton Sea. “It’s a dry subject,” he quips. Perhaps it’s an unsurprising permanent hobby for the longest-serving board member of the Metropolitan Water District, selected as its chairman Tuesday after 21 years of working to change its operational philosophy from within. Brick, 59, Pasadena’s representative, said he became interested in water issues during the energy crisis of the mid-1970s while an activist and sometimes-agitator. “He’s still a radical, especially in the Latin sense,” said Rick Cole, former member of the Pasadena City Council and longtime friend of Brick. “The root word of radical is `root,’ and it means going to the root of problems instead of sniffing around the branches.” PASADENA – Ask Tim Brick to talk about himself and it isn’t long before the conversation flows back to his chief passion. His only passion. Water. Oh, first a few landlocked details slip out: a beloved dog, an FBI agent father, a seminary education. Brick, who grew up near San Gabriel and has a B.A. in philosophy from Cal State Los Angeles, long ago promoted ideas such as conservation, sustainability and social justice – principles that today are embraced and championed by the agency. It’s a big departure from the world of Robert Towne’s “Chinatown,” where Jack Nicholson’s Jake Gittes character investigates the heavy-handed, crooked water officials engineering the transformation of a semi-arid desert into well-soaked Los Angeles. Brick’s ascension to board leadership “shows how water is no longer an exotic domain of specialists, but rather is at the centerpiece of reshaping Southern California for a more environmentally and socially sustainable future,” Cole said. During Brick’s two decades on the board, the MWD has moved to the forefront of research and innovation in sustainable technologies. For the first time this year, it provided grants to students across the Southland to develop solutions to global water issues. There’s likely some of Brick’s evangelism in all of that. He credits real-world realities of diminishing supply and rising demand for the philosophical shifts in the MWD, but admits he’s tried to do his part in changing the powerful agency’s culture. “I feel good about the role I’ve been able to play by `selling out,”‘ he said. “Conservation is an economic concept. Before that, it was just something we did when there was a drought.” Long before “think locally, act globally” appeared on bumper stickers, Cole said it was Brick’s personal philosophy. And his election to the role of chairman, he said, came as an unexpected surprise to many of his colleagues. “The significance of that was not lost on the board,” he said. During his two-year term, he said he will push for environmental sustainability, equity for those served and accountability from the MWD. MWD’s decisions affect the water supply of six counties and 18 million people. That’s 6 million more people than when Brick joined the board in 1985, and it’s a point of pride for him that consumption has not increased. Brick receives a $1,000-per-month stipend for serving on the board and also works as managing director of the Arroyo Seco Foundation. todd.ruiz@sgvn.com (626) 578-6300, Ext. 4444160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img

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SA state steelmaker one step nearer

first_img27 November 2012 South Africa moved one step closer to the creation of a state-owned steel manufacturer on Monday with the Industrial Development Corporation’s (IDC’s) R3.4-billion acquisition of Anglo American’s majority stake in the Scaw Metals Group. Resources giant Anglo American said in a statement on Monday that it had finalised the sale of its 74% interest in Scaw Metals to an IDC-led consortium that included empowerment partners Izingwe Holdings, Shanduka Resources and the Southern Palace Group of Companies. The IDC’s divisional executive of mining and manufacturing, Abel Malinga, said in a statement that the acquisition “puts the IDC in a unique position to make the necessary investments to grow Scaw’s operations, supporting beneficiation, infrastructure development and South Africa’s economic growth”. The government has for some time criticised market leader ArcelorMittal SA for selling steel locally at export prices. “High steel input costs inhibit the development of a robust and sustainable downstream steel fabrication industry to the detriment of job creation,” Malinga said. “It is critical to maintain and deepen the industrialisation of the economy by refocusing the beneficiation strategy to support fabrication and manufacturing.” Malinga said the IDC aimed to leverage existing strengths within the business, to grow it into a global player, taking advantage of opportunities that would be opened up by South Africa’s massive state-led infrastructure drive, announced earlier this year by President Jacob Zuma. “As a leading diversified South African fabricator, Scaw has the potential to be a key supplier to planned infrastructure and construction programmes.” SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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Freedom Day: long time coming

first_imgDorothy Molefe, Hector Pieterson’s mother, and photographer Sam Nzima. The Hector Pieterson Memorial in Soweto, with the iconic image.(Images: Lucille Davie)MEDIA CONTACTS • Mack LeweleDirector, communications, Departmentof Arts   and Culture+27 (0)12 441 3083RELATED ARTICLES• Freedom rediscovered• Freedom Park: celebrating peace• Hold on to freedom, says Brand South AfricaLucille DavieFreedom Day on 27 April marks the day South Africa voted in its first democratic elections. That day took 342 years to reach.Racial discrimination existed in various forms almost from the start of European settlement in the country, when the Dutch East India Company governor, Jan van Riebeeck, arrived at the Cape in 1652. But it was formally legislated when the National Party came to power in 1948. Dehumanising laws separating people along race lines, decreeing where they could live, get jobs, educate their children, spend their leisure time, make friendships, were introduced.It took 46 years to abandon apartheid, and on 27 April 1994 the first democratic elections were held in the country, with Nelson Mandela becoming the country’s first democratic president. But that was a battle hard fought, with many lives lost, many going into exile, many tortured for their beliefs, many families separated, many lives destroyed. The path to the end of apartheid is a story of courage, determination and sacrifice. Names like Chief Albert Luthuli, Mandela, Oliver Tambo, Walter Sisulu, Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, Helen Joseph, Ruth First, Dr Yusuf Dadoo, Lilian Ngoyi and many others, stand as giants of the struggle.The Freedom CharterSouth Africa’s constitution used the Freedom Charter as its building block. The charter brought together the heartfelt desires and longings of the millions of oppressed South Africans, from all walks of life. On 26 June 1955, people from around the country gathered on a dusty soccer field in Kliptown, the first suburb of Soweto, to approve the Freedom Charter over a two-day period, in an atmosphere described by Mandela in his Long Walk to Freedom autobiography as “serious and festive”.Mandela set the scene on the day: “More than three thousand delegates braved police intimidation to assemble and approve the final document. They came by car, bus, truck and foot. Although the overwhelming number of delegates were black, there were more than three hundred Indians, two hundred coloureds and one hundred whites.”On the afternoon of the second day, the police stopped the meeting, saying they suspected treason was being committed. Mandela had to creep away (he and Sisulu were hiding on the roof of a hardware store overlooking the field, because they were banned at the time). He says in his autobiography: “Like other enduring political documents, such as the American Declaration of Independence, the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Communist Manifesto, the Freedom Charter is a mixture of practical goals and poetic language.”The charter was signed by Luthuli a year later.The Treason TrialMandela admits that the apartheid government had just cause to consider the document treasonable: “The charter was in fact a revolutionary document precisely because the changes it envisioned could not be achieved without radically altering the economic and political structure of South Africa. It was not meant to be capitalist or socialist but a melding together of the people’s demands to end the oppression. In South Africa, merely to achieve fairness, one had to destroy apartheid itself, for it was the very embodiment of injustice.”And the government acted accordingly. Exactly 18 months later it struck: in December 1956 they arrested Mandela, the entire executive leadership of the ANC and others – 156 people in all. They were charged with high treason and “a countrywide conspiracy to use violence to overthrow the present government and replace it with a communist state”, says Mandela. If found guilty, the sentence was death.So began the notorious Treason Trial, which lasted almost five years, after which the accused were acquitted – the judges said the prosecution had failed to prove that the ANC was a communist organisation or that the Freedom Charter propagated a communist state.Of his acquittal in 1961, Mandela said: “After more than four years in court and dozens of prosecutors, thousands of documents and tens of thousands of pages of testimony, the state had failed in its mission. The verdict was an embarrassment to the government, both at home and abroad. Yet the result only made the state more bitter towards us. The lesson they took away was not that we had legitimate grievances but that they needed to be far more ruthless.”Kliptown MuseumThe story of the thousands of people who contributed to the drafting of the Freedom Charter is now told in the Kliptown Open Air Museum. The museum, on the western wing of the Walter Sisulu Square of Dedication in Kliptown, which incorporates the humble soccer field, was opened in 2007.The museum is open seven days a week, and guided tours are offered.Liliesleaf in RivoniaIn 1961 the ANC, established in 1912, decided to form an armed wing, Umkhonto we Sizwe (meaning spear of the nation) or MK, led by Mandela. Decades of peaceful resistance had led nowhere, with black people becoming increasingly frustrated. MK’s operations were conducted underground, with its headquarters on a smallholding on a small farm called Liliesleaf, in the suburb of Rivonia, in northern Johannesburg.The key leaders had operated from its outhouses for two years. Mandela lived on the property, masquerading as the gardener and cook, under the alias of David Motsamayi. In those days, Rivonia consisted of a rural patchwork of smallholdings, riding schools and farms, with few tarred roads. Today, it has been engulfed by the northern expansion of Johannesburg, to become one of the city’s most upmarket suburbs.In July 1963, a dry cleaning van drove up to the door. Armed policemen burst out … and from that moment, the word “Rivonia” became synonymous around the world with the silencing of black resistance in South Africa. Mandela describes the swoop on Liliesleaf in his autobiography: “On the afternoon of 11 July, a dry cleaner’s van entered the long driveway of the farm. No one at Liliesleaf had ordered a delivery. The vehicle was stopped by a young African guard, but he was overwhelmed when dozens of armed policemen and several police dogs sprang from the vehicle. In the [the thatched cottage] they found a dozen men around a table discussing a document.”That document turned out to be the plan and outline of Operation Mayibuye, the MK strategy for guerrilla warfare in South Africa. The men in the room were Raymond Mhlaba, Govan Mbeki, Lionel “Rusty” Bernstein, Walter Sisulu, Bob Hepple, Ahmed Kathrada and Denis Goldberg. Mandela himself was absent – he was serving a five-year sentence on Robben Island for inciting workers to strike in mid-1961, and for leaving the country without a passport.He wrote: “In one fell swoop, the police had captured the entire High Command of Umkhonto we Sizwe.”Mandela was brought up to Pretoria from the island, having served nine months of his five-year sentence, and together with the other top MK members, was charged with sabotage, a crime carrying the death sentence, in what was referred to as the Rivonia Trial. Says Mandela: “From that moment on we lived in the shadow of the gallows.”But they didn’t get the death sentence – instead, they were given life imprisonment. In 1964, the prison doors slammed on their backs – most of the men served between 22 and 27 years in prison, Mandela being the last one to be released in February 1990.At the trial Mandela made a speech from the dock instead of testifying. The speech is perhaps one of the country’s most significant documents, and it ends with probably Mandela’s most poignant words. “During my lifetime I have dedicated myself to this struggle of the African people. I have fought against white domination, and I have fought against black domination. I have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. It is an ideal which I hope to live for and to achieve. But if needs be, it is an ideal for which I am prepared to die.”The buildings of Liliesleaf have been sensitively restored, and are now open as a museum and conference centre. Daily tours can be taken, and the site is open seven days a week.Resistance gathersThe apartheid government thought it had silenced the ANC, but it wasn’t long before the resistance gathered again. It came to a head with the actions of schoolchildren in Soweto, the country’s biggest township, just outside Johannesburg. There had been rumblings of discontent in early 1976 when the government imposed Afrikaans on pupils, forcing teachers to teach certain subjects in the language of the government, a language with which they were not comfortable.That discontent culminated in a march by some 15 000 children to the Orlando Stadium in Soweto, on 16 June 1976. But they didn’t get to the stadium because they met the police along the way. With varying accounts of how the bloodshed started, the police were soon firing into the crowd, killing and wounding the children. It is estimated that 566 people died in Soweto on that day.One child, 12-year-old Hector Pieterson, came to symbolise the day and the brutality of apartheid. He was shot by police, and was gathered up in the arms of another pupil, Mbuyisa Makhubo, who, together with Hector’s sister, Antoinette, ran towards a press car, where he was bundled in, and taken to a nearby clinic, where he was pronounced dead.Another child, 13-year-old Hastings Ndlovu, was fatally shot before Hector was gunned down, but the difference was that photographer Sam Nzima was on hand to record the event, in what is now an iconic image of apartheid police killing children. The photograph hit the front pages of the world’s newspapers the next day.“I saw a child fall down. Under a shower of bullets I rushed forward and went for the picture. It had been a peaceful march, the children were told to disperse, they started singing Nkosi Sikelele [the freedom anthem]. The police were ordered to shoot,” said Nzima of the day. “I was the only photographer there at the time. Other photographers came when they heard shots,” he says. Nzima was a photographer for The World newspaper in Johannesburg.The Hector Pieterson Museum and Memorial, opened in 2002, commemorates Hector and the other children who died on that day and the days that followed. The confrontation spread around the township, and around the country, and 16 June, now commemorated as Youth Day, will forever be remembered as the day of the beginning of the end of apartheid.It was followed by the turbulent 1980s, when apartheid’s cracks widened, aided by international boycotts and sanctions and the unsustainability of apartheid. By the end of the 1980s, apartheid was on its knees, a wounded and desperate animal. In February 1990, Mandela was released from prison and four years later the first democratic elections were held.The Apartheid Museum, in Nasrec in southern Johannesburg, graphically and movingly captures the terrible history of apartheid, in powerful displays, large blown-up photographs, artefacts, newspaper clippings, and some moving film footage. This extraordinarily powerful museum is an obligatory stop for tourists and residents alike.last_img read more

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