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Russia’s HIV/AIDS epidemic is getting worse, not better

first_img A changing epidemic The HIV/AIDS epidemic in Russia began in people who inject drugs, but heterosexual transmission has increasingly become a major driver. In small surveys, men who have sex with men have extremely high infection rates, but they rarely are studied. Roizman sees no need for harm reduction programs for drug users; NGOs that offered needle exchange in Yekaterinburg failed to make a dent, he says. He visited Ukraine, which legalized opiate substitution therapy, to see how it worked. “An army of heroin addicts,” he says, was “reconfigured into an army of methadone addicts.”In other ways, however, Roizman’s agenda is not entirely at odds with the international HIV/AIDS community, and he has a progressive bent. A published poet who opened a free museum of religious icon painting and sculpture, he strongly supported the opposition to Putin in the March election and is critical of “the main government officials” for not speaking about HIV. Roizman promotes condoms and sex education for teens. And he publicly took an HIV test himself to encourage people to know their status and start treatment if needed. “There are more serious problems and issues that we have to battle, but bearing in mind the dynamics, we do understand that HIV might just steal the future.”A different approach is in view on the banks of the Volga River in Kazan, the capital of the Republic of Tatarstan. Kazan’s ornate kremlin (which means “fortress”), replete with both a mosque and a cathedral, dates back to Ivan the Terrible in the 16th century. The city has fanciful buildings of more recent vintage, too: a 30-meter-tall, copper-colored cauldron, a wedding palace built in 2013; and a swank soccer arena that opened the same year and is hosting World Cup games this month. The city is well-heeled, with an unusually large Muslim population for this part of Russia and a long history of independence—which helps explain why it stands out in its HIV/AIDS response.Kazan in 1999 began aggressive needle and syringe exchange programs and other harm reduction efforts with support from NGOs, the semiautonomous republic itself, and eventually The Global Fund. “We’ve had a stable epidemic,” says Larisa Badrieva, an epidemiologist and researcher there. “We really reached a lot of people very, very quickly.” The city recorded about 1000 new HIV cases in 2001, she says, and that number fell to about 150 in 2008, with little evidence that the virus was spreading to the general population. A relatively high percentage of HIV-infected people in Tatarstan—about 50%—is being treated with ARVs. Yet Badrieva is worried about the future. With the pullout of The Global Fund and with other outside assistance drying up, Badrieva says only one of seven centers in the city dedicated to drug users is still operating, and she is unsure whether it will remain open much longer. “Unless there’s a dramatic shift in the drug scene, we’ll see an increase of HIV infection across all groups,” Badrieva predicts. Other 0% In the face of a misguided response to HIV/AIDS in Russia, these bright stars are taking charge Tereza Kasaeva, a deputy director of the Ministry of Health who coordinates the country’s HIV/AIDS programs (after meeting with Science in November 2017, she became head of WHO’s Global TB Programme), acknowledges that Russia “didn’t pay much attention” to the problem until the past 5 years, but she says the current criticism is overblown. “Everybody is talking about the need to avoid stigma,” Kasaeva says. “We are against the stigma on the Russian Federation about the situation.”Kasaeva and her colleagues stress that the number of people getting treatment has increased severalfold over the past few years, and they note that they recently completed their first strategic plan to battle the disease. “We understand that now we have a problem and we’re trying to solve it,” she says. Everyone who requests treatment receives it, she insists, although some “people are trying to hide” and don’t request it. Yes, shortages of ARVs occurred in some places last year, but that was only because of speed bumps in a shift away from regional drug purchase and distribution to a more streamlined, cost-effective federally run program.Kasaeva recognizes that harm reduction programs might slow HIV’s spread in the short term, but they don’t address underlying problems, she says. “They’re very popular and they look so smart and pretty, but in fact if we look into the problem deeply, it’s not solving the problem.” Harm reduction, “according to the opinion of a huge number of Russian experts,” focuses on the symptoms and not the causes of addiction, she says. In contrast, the country’s “systematic program of rehabilitation for drug users,” she insists, has long-term effectiveness.Yevgeny Roizman, who until last month was the powerful mayor of Yekaterinburg, has embraced that effort. (Roizman resigned in protest after regional lawmakers voted to end direct election of the mayor.) In 1999 he started a rehab program called City Without Drugs that, at the request of parents, forcibly removed teen addicts from their homes and locked them up while they went through withdrawal, chaining them to their beds at times. Criticism from human rights groups—featured prominently in Western European and U.S. media—and lawsuits ultimately shut the centers, but Roizman offers no apologies. He insists the program helped his region, the Sverdlovsk Oblast, eliminate heroin addiction and slow the spread of HIV. “My goal was to stop youth from using drugs,” Roizman says. Although he offers few hard numbers to back his claims that the program worked, he has an abundance of anecdotes, proudly noting that he recently located 22 of the first teens treated at City Without Drugs who now have 38 kids of their own. “They’re not doing drugs ever since they got to us,” he says. Yevgeny Roizman, former mayor of Yekaterinburg, Russia, has opened a museum of religious icons. He has taken a hardline stance against drug users. Misha Friedman 100% UNAIDS calculates that between 2010 and 2015, Russia accounted for more than 80% of the new HIV infections in the entire Eastern European and the Central Asian region. By Russia’s own estimates, the epidemic grew 10% per year during that period, with the new infections roughly split between people who inject drugs and heterosexual transmission. At about the same time, new infections in the rest of Europe and North America dropped by 9%. By the end of 2017, the Russian Ministry of Health estimates, just shy of 1 million people were living with HIV. Even official accounts acknowledge that only one-third of those receive ARVs.Many people, even within the government, think those estimates understate the epidemic. Vadim Pokrovsky, who heads the Federal Scientific and Methodological Center for Prevention and Control of AIDS in Moscow, an epidemiological surveillance arm that’s independent from the Ministry of Health, does battle with the divisions that oversee HIV and tuberculosis (TB). His group estimates that between 1.1 million and 1.4 million Russians are infected with HIV. And Michel Kazatchkine, special adviser to UNAIDS in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, and colleagues concluded in a study published last year that the true number of infected people may be as high as 2 million. They based their number on an estimate by Pokrovsky’s team that only half the infected people in Russia knew their HIV status in 2013. 50% In June, the pharmacy ran out of ARVs.Through social media, Katia contacted an HIV-infected woman, 2000 kilometers away in St. Petersburg, who was part of a “reserve pharmacy”—a network that gathers and redistributes ARVs from people who have either switched treatments or died. The woman told Katia whom to contact in Yekaterinburg. “I asked how much the pills would cost,” Katia says. “She was like, ‘Are you out of your mind? Just go and get your pills.’”Almost anywhere in the world, an HIV-infected woman who has an uninfected partner and wants to have a baby would be first in line to receive ARVs. The challenges Katia faced in getting treatment amid Russia’s epidemic highlight the country’s faltering response, which critics have blasted as misguided, lackadaisical, and downright dismissive. Some federal health officials even question the term epidemic. “This is a very large and very serious epidemic, and certainly one of the few epidemics in the world that continues to get worse rather than get better,” says Vinay Saldanha, the Moscow-based regional director for the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. “This is a public health crisis.”Yet the informal network of HIV-infected people that ultimately supplied Katia with ARVs highlights another, less recognized side of Russia’s response. The darker the night, as Fyodor Dostoevsky wrote in Crime and Punishment, the brighter the stars. Bold, committed HIV/AIDS advocates in Russia are pushing hard for change—and a few places in the country show signs, albeit modest, of mounting effective responses. Having gone through years of AIDS in Europe and then in Africa and everywhere as head of The Global Fund, I just cannot accept that there have been so many missed opportunities. Michel Kazatchkine, special adviser to UNAIDS in Eastern Europe and Central Asia Russia’s HIV/AIDS epidemic is getting worse, not better 2016 2010 2005 2000center_img Needle sharing Nigeria has more HIV-infected babies than anywhere in the world. It’s a distinction no country wants Special package: Far from over Three places where “ending AIDS” is a distant hope  Kazatchkine, who earlier headed The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, also in Geneva, says Russia has unnecessarily let a containable epidemic explode. “Having gone through years of AIDS in Europe and then in Africa and everywhere as head of The Global Fund, I just cannot accept that there have been so many missed opportunities,” he says.HIV took off in Russia in the mid-1990s, later than in Western European countries, and at first the spread was limited mainly to heroin users sharing needles and syringes. Even before he took over The Global Fund in 2007, Kazatchkine and others urged the government to use proven “harm reduction” prevention strategies, including needle and syringe exchange programs and opiate substitutes such as methadone. Several nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) started programs for drug users, but the government offered no funding for what it saw as “Western” ideas that went against conservative Russian culture—and to this day opiate substitutes remain outlawed. The government also did little for another highly stigmatized group, men who have sex with men (MSM), who also are at high risk of infection. Since 2013, a “propaganda law” has made posting or discussing information geared toward MSM illegal. They rely on NGOs for many HIV services, as do sex workers.Compounding the problem, several NGOs left the country starting a decade ago after Russia, emboldened by a strengthening economy, began phasing out The Global Fund’s support—which to date has totaled $378 million. “They said, ‘We don’t need The Global Fund or money from outside; we’ll cover everything ourselves,’ but they didn’t do it,” Pokrovsky says. “We not only stopped outreach work, we lost many people working in NGOs because they had no federal support.” Other NGOs pulled up stakes after President Vladimir Putin in 2013 enacted a law that forced many of them to register as “foreign agents.”“They basically let the epidemic grow because of lack of prevention and because of very low access to treatment,” Kazatchkine says. “In short, they did it all wrong.”No program yet provides ARVs to high-risk uninfected people, a prevention strategy called pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) that has had remarkable success, particularly with MSM in Western Europe, Australia, and the United States. “Who would PrEP be for?” Kazatchkine quips. “There are no MSM.”On top of all those challenges, Russia has a dysfunctional medical system, says Olga Bogolyubova, a psychologist who did HIV/AIDS research in St. Petersburg but, fed up, moved to the United States in 2015. Bogolyubova, who works at Clarkson University in Potsdam, New York, says Russia’s broken system vastly complicates attempts to add HIV/AIDS programs for vulnerable populations. “The Russian medical system can be difficult to navigate and abusive even to people who aren’t vulnerable,” she says, noting long waits to see specialists and short supplies of medicines for many conditions. “A navy admiral recently shot himself because he couldn’t get access to cancer care.” In 2015, a dermatologist in Russia’s fourth largest city, Yekaterinburg, diagnosed Katia with herpes. “I had no idea what it was,” says Katia, who asked that her last name not be used. But because she had suffered repeated illnesses over the preceding 2 years and had an alcoholic ex-boyfriend who simultaneously had other girlfriends, she suspected that something more serious might be wrong. She asked the doctor to give her a referral for an HIV test. “Why?” he asked. “Are you going to marry a foreigner?”“I persisted and said, ‘I’m not leaving here until I get a referral.’”The day Katia learned the test results, she walked the streets for hours crying, unable to even find her car. The literature she received explained she had the AIDS virus and said the outlook was grim. She read that the virus, if untreated, could kill her in as few as 3 years. Katia, then 30, had a young daughter. Who would raise her? And Katia had to hide her infection from her employer—her father. “If I told my father I had HIV, he wouldn’t understand. He’d run away from me. Overall, the attitude here is horrible. When I look at [Western] Europe or the United States, I don’t understand why it’s so different here.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)For Katia, the differences between east and west would soon become far starker.Since 2015, the World Health Organization (WHO) in Geneva, Switzerland, has recommended treating everyone who tests positive for HIV, but doctors—despite what the literature suggested—assured Katia her immune system hadn’t suffered enough damage to warrant antiretrovirals (ARVs). Two years later, Katia was married to a new partner and wanted to have another child. She had read on social media that HIV was a scam by Big Pharma, but that made no sense to her because the government promises free treatment. Other sites said proper treatment would almost eliminate her risk of transmitting the virus to her husband, who was uninfected, or their baby. She went to the AIDS center and requested ARVs. “They told me, ‘Don’t worry, your level of virus is low, you won’t infect your husband, he’s in the military and he’s strong.’” Finally, in February 2017, after more than 2 months and a battery of tests, the doctors agreed to treat her, and in May, she became pregnant. Maria Jacovleva (left), who directs the nongovernmental organization Candle, does HIV testing at a St. Petersburg vegan bar, Animal. Misha Friedman Misha Friedman 2016 J. You/Science By Jon CohenJun. 11, 2018 , 4:00 PM Vyacheslav Ignatenko (right), holding a tray of opiate cooking equipment, receives bags of syringes from a needle exchange in Kazan, Russia. Heterosexual Like Kazan, St. Petersburg is often out of step with Moscow and has made solid headway against HIV/AIDS. The most westernized city in the country, St. Petersburg “is kind of an oasis,” says Gregory Vergus, who works with an HIV/AIDS NGO called the International Treatment Preparedness Coalition. As a federal city, St. Petersburg directly receives funding from Moscow for HIV prevention, and Vergus says it invests the money wisely, focusing on vulnerable groups. “Most regions spend their HIV prevention money on balloons, songs, and working with grannies,” he says.Saldanha says he’s particularly heartened about the latest data from the city. “We’re hoping that St. Petersburg has now turned the corner,” he says. In 2016, new infections in the city dropped below 2000 people a year for the first time since the epidemic took off, according to the city’s AIDS center. Of the 36,000 residents who know they are living with HIV, about half now receive ARVs, and 82% of that group have undetectable levels of virus in their blood, meaning they are adhering to their treatment regimens. “We’re doing something right,” says Tatiana Vinogradova, deputy director of the St. Petersburg AIDS Center.St. Petersburg still faces serious challenges, Vinogradova notes. Recent surveys that tested large groups of sex workers and MSM both showed double-digit prevalence of HIV, and only about 5% of the people already knew their status. Many migrants who have HIV also come to the region from former Soviet countries and do not have the proper St. Petersburg registration necessary to receive treatment and care. “It’s a big problem, and we have no instruments to do anything about it,” she says.Still, Saldanha says, the fact that “St. Petersburg is finally pulling its head above water” gives him hope for the country as a whole. “It’s very much a sign that in contemporary Russia, you can implement evidence-based HIV prevention programs,” he says. But St. Petersburg is only one city in a highly populated, geographically expansive country. “They have a treatment coverage level that is half what it is in Zimbabwe,” he stresses. “This epidemic is not going to go away on its own.”Science produced these stories in collaboration with the PBS NewsHour, which is airing a companion five-part series. Reporting for this project was supported by the Pulitzer Center.last_img read more

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University finds prominent astrophysicist Lawrence Krauss grabbed a woman’s breast

first_img Australian microbiologist Melanie Thomson witnessed the incident. Krauss, who is traveling in Iceland, could not immediately be reached for comment.The news comes one day after Krauss announced on Twitter that his position as director of the Origins Project, which probes the beginnings of the universe, was not renewed for another 5-year term. ASU placed Krauss on paid administrative leave on 6 March, two weeks after BuzzFeed published an exposé describing multiple sexual harassment allegations against him. It barred him from campus during the probe. The university would not say whether it has reached conclusions on the credibility of the other allegations in that article.Thomson first filed a complaint with ASU about the incident in July 2017. The university quickly concluded there was insufficient evidence to find that Krauss had violated ASU policy. But it reopened the probe in February, after publication of the BuzzFeed article, which described the incident in Australia, as well as several others. (Krauss offered an extensive rebuttal to the Buzzfeed article.)“They should have believed me the first time,” Thomson says. “It’s ridiculous the amount of effort you have to go through to stop universities from just dismissing these cases. I have been traumatized by the process and I wasn’t even a victim.” Lawrence Krauss, pictured at a January press conference in Washington, D.C., is on administrative leave from Arizona State University in Tempe. By Meredith WadmanAug. 3, 2018 , 6:45 PM LEAH MILLIS/REUTERS/Newscom The incident took place at a gala reception during the annual Australian Skeptics Convention in Melbourne in November 2016, when a woman asked to take a selfie with Krauss. (Krauss is a prominent member of the skeptics movement, which disputes the existence of a god or supernatural powers.) The investigators interviewed two eyewitnesses, and two other witnesses who did not see the incident but were at the reception and spoke with the unnamed woman the same evening, soon after it occurred. They described her variously as “frazzled and troubled” and “shocked,” according to the provost’s determination. One eyewitness to the selfie said the woman “reacted with shock and physically moved away” from Krauss. A second said that the woman “body check[ed]” Krauss immediately after he grabbed her breast. The unnamed woman, who according to Searle’s determination declined to be interviewed by investigators when the probe was first opened in the summer of 2017, did speak with them in March. She told them that “she did not feel victimized, felt it was a clumsy interpersonal interaction and thought she had handled it in the moment,” telling Krauss directly that his behavior was not OK. According to the document: “She also stated to the OEI investigator that the incident did not merit the man losing his career.”Krauss denied to investigators that he touched the woman’s breast. Thomson provided the investigators with the selfie photo, with the woman’s face redacted. According to the determination, it shows his right hand and arm coming over her right shoulder, with his hand in mid-air. Krauss told investigators he was either raising his hand to protect his eyes from the camera flash or reaching to steady the woman, who perhaps had lost her balance, he suggested.Investigators found the woman and the four witnesses more credible, based on a preponderance of the evidence, and Searle agreed, he wrote. *Clarification, 13 August, 4:25 p.m.: An earlier version of this story reported that Science obtained an investigative report by ASU’s Office of Equity and Inclusion. In fact, the document we obtained and linked to is a written determination authored by ASU’s provost. It is a final judgment reached on the basis of the investigative report, which Science did not obtain. University finds prominent astrophysicist Lawrence Krauss grabbed a woman’s breast Melanie Thomson The provost of Arizona State University (ASU) in Tempe concluded this week that high-profile astrophysicist and atheist Lawrence Krauss violated the university’s sexual harassment policy by grabbing a woman’s breast at a conference in Australia in late 2016.“Responsive action is being taken to prevent any further recurrence of similar conduct,” ASU’s executive vice president and provost, Mark Searle, wrote in a 31 July letter to Melanie Thomson, a microbiologist based in Ocean Grove, Australia, who is an outspoken advocate for women in science. Thomson, who witnessed the breast-grabbing incident, received the provost’s written judgment, called a “determination” from Searle and shared it with Science. His conclusion concurred with the findings of investigators from ASU’s Office of Equity and Inclusion (OEI).In response to an email asking what specific actions the university is taking, an ASU spokesperson wrote: “Professor Lawrence Krauss is no longer director of Arizona State University’s Origins Project, a research unit at ASU. Krauss remains on administrative leave from the university. It is the policy of the university not to comment on ongoing personnel matters.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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IFFI classics section to open with Guru Dutts “Pyaasa”

first_imgMumbai, Nov 18 (PTI) A restored version of Guru Dutts “Pyaasa” will be the opening film in the Indian Classics section at the 45th International Film Festival of India (IFFI) 2015 to be held in Goa.Produced and directed by Guru Dutt, the 1957 film had an ensemble star cast including Guru Dutt, Waheeda Rehman, Mala Sinha, Johnny Walker, Rehman, Mehmood and Tun Tun.”The screening of Pyaasa will be held on November 21 at Azad Maidan in Panjim that has a capacity of over 1,000 people. There is a huge fan following of Guru Dutt all over the world who have not been able to see this ageless classic in its original form and glory.”We will also be re-releasing the film theatrically worldwide after the festival,” said Sushil Kumar Agrawal, CEO of Ultra Media and Entertainment, which has restored the film.The most challenging part in restoring “Pyaasa” was of sourcing the authentic materials to complete the preservation, Agrawal said.”After much effort, we found the original camera negatives of the film at an archive in India. However, a lot of the parts of the negatives were either damaged or lost,” he said.In September, the restored film had world premiere in the competition section at the 72nd Venice Film Festival. It competed with 20 other prestigious restored films from all over the world and was also screened in the restored classics section of the recently concluded 17th Jio MAMI Mumbai Film Festival.Besides “Pyaasa”, eight more films under the classics section to be screened at the Azad Maidan venue in open air screening format are “Jait re Jait”, “Manthan”, “Bhavani Bhavai”, “Is Raat ki Subaah Nahi”, “Uttarayanam”, “Ek Din Achanak”, “Ajantrik” and “Do Bigha Zameen”. PTI MM GK BK RYSadvertisementlast_img read more

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Juventus part ways with Massimiliano Allegri after five years

first_imgAdvertisementJuventus and Massimiliano Allegri part ways after a good five years. Inability to land the Champions League might have been the cause for this decision.Image Courtesy: MetroJuventus have confirmed that their current manager Massimiliano Allegri will leave the club at the end of the season. While the reasons for Allegri leaving not known, one must assume that his failure to land the Champions League might have cost him the job.The 51 year old reached two finals with the Italian side but lost both. Despite this, he had a seller time at Turin bagging 5 Serie A titles, 4 Coppa Italia trophies and 2 SuperCoppa Italiana titles.Singing of Ronaldo last summer made everyone think that Juventus have found the key to win the Champions League. But the side had to exit the tournament after losing to Ajax in the quarterfinals. The statement released on the club website regarding Allegri’s departure read:“Massimiliano Allegri will not sit on the Juventus bench in the 2019-2020 season.“The coach and the president, Andrea Agnelli, will meet the media together at a press conference, which will be held tomorrow, Saturday 18 May, at 2pm (CET) in the conference hall of the Allianz Stadium.”Allegri’s next move is not known but with the managers of Bayern, Chelsea and Barcelona having an unsecure future, Allegri’s exit might pose a threat to their jobs.Meanwhile Antonio Conte, who has already led Juventus before is being rumoured to replace Allegri for the next season.Also Read:La Liga Transfer Rumors: Atletico Madrid eyeing Arsenal’s Lacazette to replace Antoine Griezmann Advertisementlast_img read more

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Budget 2013: “Restoring Hope, Expanding Opportunities”

first_imgMr. Speaker, I believe that my presence in this Honourable House is an expression of the confidence of my constituents in East Central St Andrew to represent their best interest. For five successive elections they have returned me as their Member of Parliament. In the lonely moments that come with this job, they have always been there for me and have never failed to give unreservedly of their love and support. I thank them wholeheartedly for this support. ?As a member of the team, led by the Most Honourable Portia Simpson Miller, let me pay a well-deserved tribute for her leadership. I further want to thank her for her continued confidence in my ability to lead the Ministry of Finance and Planning at this critical time. I must also place on record my appreciation for the support of my team in the ministry – my colleague, Minister Horace Dalley, who shares with me the responsibilities of an extremely demanding Ministry. He is to be commended for the leadership he brought to securing the agreement with the public sector unions in support of the economic programme. This agreement with the public sector unions was critical in meeting one of the prior action requirements towards securing an IMF agreement. “Nuff Respect is due to him”. During the year under review, Dr. Wesley Hughes demitted office as Financial Secretary and moved on to take up responsibility as head of the PetroCaribe Fund. In thanking him for his service as Financial Secretary, we are confident that he will carry to his new post the capacity and integrity that has characterised his years of public service. He has been succeeded as Financial Secretary by Mr. Devon Rowe who brings to the position years of experience at the highest levels of the Public Sector. Already he has demonstrated his ability to make a positive impact as the administrative head of the Ministry of Finance and Planning. I must again place on record my appreciation to the staff of the Ministry of Finance and Planning for their unwavering and professional support; and to my personal staff for their patience and commitment, particularly in those difficult moments which come with the territory. I would also like to recognize the contribution of the staff in the departments and agencies which underpin the work of the Ministry. In particular, I would also like to recognize the contribution of the Governor of the Bank of Jamaica, the Financial Secretary and the Director General of the Planning Institute of Jamaica (PIOJ) along with the members of my advisory group, the Hon. Shirley Tyndall, Mr. Dennis Morrison and Mr. Colin Bullock for their role in bringing the IMF negotiations to successful conclusion….Read More Download the Finance Minister’s Budget 2013 Speech herelast_img read more

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Nearly 11 billion pledged for beleaguered Yemen at UNled humanitarian conference

Secretary-General António Guterres (at podium) is joined by from left: Foreign Ministers Margot Wallström of Sweden, and Didier Burkhalter of Switzerland, and Emergency Relief Coordinator, Stephen O’Brien at the press briefing in Geneva of the High-Level Pledging Event for Yemen. Photo: OCHA/Violaine Martin The aim was to bridge a funding gap in the 2017 humanitarian appeal of $2.1 billion. Prior to the conference, only about 15 per cent had been met.“We are witnessing the starving and the crippling of an entire generation. We must act now, to save lives,” said Secretary-General António Guterres, who presided over the opening of the High-level Pledging Event on the humanitarian crisis in Yemen, alongside the Foreign Affairs Ministers of Switzerland and Sweden.He noted that the “man-made crisis” had devastated the economy of a country that was “pitifully poor” even before the current conflict, and forced three million people from their homes – leaving many being unable to earn a living or grow crops.“Some 17 million are food-insecure, making this the world’s largest hunger crisis,” Mr. Guterres said, highlighting a situation worsened by import restrictions and the destruction of port facilities. Calling particular attention to children at risk in Yemen, Mr. Guterres said that on average, one child under the age of five dies of preventable causes every 10 minutes in Yemen.“This means fifty children in Yemen will die during today’s conference – and all those deaths could have been prevented,” he stated. VIDEO: 5 things you need to know about Yemen. Credit: United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)‘Between famine and starvation lies disease’More than two years of fighting has destroyed the country’s infrastructure – including attacks that targeted civilians. Some 325 attacks have been verified on health facilities, schools, markets and other infrastructure.As the violence rose, the ability to aid those in need has been hampered. The disruption of health services has been “severe,” Margaret Chan, Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO), told the pledging event.Less than half of the country’s health facilities are functioning and the majority of health providers, if they stayed, have not been paid since at least August 2016.She warned also that infections would increase as the population grows more hungry.“Large swaths of the population are on the brink of famine,” Dr. Chan said. “Between famine and death from starvation lies disease. Infections that a well-nourished body wards off become deadly in severely malnourished people.”She called for more services, such as vaccinations, and access to basic health services. Avoiding famine by supporting farmers On the sidelines of the pledging conference, Director-General of the UN Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) Jose Graziano da Silva met with Yemeni Prime Minister Ahmed Obaid Bin Daghr to discuss aid to farmers.During his address to the conference, Mr. da Silva noted that farming aid coupled with food assistance is the only way to avoid a famine in the country.“Agricultural assistancein a humanitarian crisis can no longer be an afterthought,” the FAO Director-General said. “We need to seize every opportunity to support communities in Yemen to continue producing food, even under difficult circumstances.”He stressed how livelihoods support, especially for agriculture and fishing, must be an integral part of the international community’s response to the crisis in Yemen.AUDIO: UN Resident Coordinator for the war-torn country, Jamie McGoldrick, says the donor conference was about “hard cash and resources” to bring Yemen back from the brink of famine and not about “pledges and promises”. Credit: UN News According to the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), pledges were made by 48 Member States, the European Commission, the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) and four NGO/humanitarian organizations for humanitarian action in Yemen in 2017. “Now we must see the pledges translated into the scaled up action the people of Yemen need and deserve,” the Mr. Guterres said. Yemen’s next challenge: lifting restrictions on aid access throughout the country The exact pledges for the day totalled $1,098,466,634, “a remarkable success” according to the Secretary-General, who expressed optimism at the close of the conference that the full amount required will materialize in the coming months.The next challenge to overcome would be to lift access restrictions throughout Yemen. Mr. Guterres urged parties of the conflict to respect international humanitarian law and allow unhindered movement of humanitarian actors to reach those in need.“Access is the key for the success of this pledging conference,” he said, calling also for the necessary infrastructure to be allowed to operate in normal conditions and for goods to be imported and distributed.Echoing the Secretary-General’s calls for access, Under-Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator Stephen O’Brien noted the UN and its humanitarian partners are “scaling up and ready to do more provided there are resources and access.”Having visited Yemen thrice over the past two years, he recalled haunting images of a 13 year old girl who now headed her household, of toddlers too sick to register their mother’s touch, and of families living with little access to food, clean water or medicines.Both officials stressed that funding alone will not reverse the fortunes of the millions of people impacted. They called for a cessation of hostilities and a political settlement, with talks facilitated by the Secretary-General’s Special Envoy Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed. read more

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Dont drop this on your foot The Concretronic PC

first_imgThink you have one tough PC? Then let me introduce you to a modder by the name of D. Heiße who definitely knows his stuff when it comes to hardening computer assets.Created for a recent modding contest, the Concretronic PC is a modified case made from one seamless layer of concrete that has been wrapped around a substructure of aluminum sheets. But that is not all. The PC case mod includes embedded Plexiglas windows so you can see the inner workings and the case even features a set of concrete SSD and HDD covers for additional detail.However, just looking at the finished product doesn’t do the entire project justice. So be sure to check out the entire Concretronic build blog to see how it was done along with project creation photos.Read more at TheBestCaseScenario, via TechEBlogConcretronic PC 1 (500 x 667)Concretronic PC 1 (500 x 667)Concretronic PC 2 (560 x 420)Concretronic PC 3 (500 x 667)Concretronic PC 4 (560 x 420)Concretronic PC 5 (560 x 420)last_img read more

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Android Ice Cream Sandwich leaked

first_imgThis has been a pretty crazy week for leaks so far. There was the German Youtube video where the guy “discovered” the secret lair of the iPhone 5 on the Apple website. Yeah, totally fake, apparently. I suppose the only thing that could be done to trump a fake iPhone leak would be to show off a fake Android one, right? Well, we’re not quite ready to go that far with this one. Yesterday the Android hacker/modder community RootzWiki in collaboration with Androidpolice.com released a series of images they are claiming are the next version of Android on a Google Nexus S. We’re a little more then suspicious, but lets go over what we know.Ice Cream SandwichThe next version of Android, which has been described as bringing together “all of the forks”, is geared towards unifying the tablet and phone experience and interface. Essentially, both tablet and phone will run Ice Cream Sandwich (ICS), and it will just be optimized for the differing screen sizes. This has been the plan from the beginning if the Android SDK Emulator is any indicator, though the phone part of the SDK emulator for Honeycomb has always been really broken. So, Google decided to merge these two experiences into ICS, the next in Google’s alphabetical and sugary line of release names. Amidst the speculation surrounding ICS devices is a future with no buttons on the front of your phone, even capacitance ones. While there’s been little to confirm it, there doesn’t seem to be any pushback against it, either.The “Leak”A series of images has come out revealing a very early version of ICS on a Nexus S. These four puctures reveal some changes made across the board that would be in line with Honeycomb. For starters, the application drawer has the grey Market logo in the top right which takes you to the Market in Honeycomb. Secondly, the dock appears to have a button on the far right that looks like a visually enhanced version of the multi-tasking application switch button in Honeycomb. Finally, the notifications drawer poses each individual element in a way that is very similar to Honeycomb. Each of these elements are things we could see being implemented in exactly this way for the next version of Android. Is that what this is, though? We’ve got our doubts.Debunked?There are a couple of things that don’t really jive in these screenshots. All of these things combined cause me to pause and really look these screenshots over with real suspicion. For starters, and this is probably the most trivial bit, the Android version doesn’t seem right. In all previous versions of Android, that space is held by a number. Most recently, that number is 2.3.5. Now this particular change is fairly simple to make on an Android ROM by editing the build.prop file. There’s no rule anywhere that says that Google won’t switch to text, maybe as a way to obfuscate low level fragfmentation like we’ve recently seen with the jump between 2.3 and 2.3.5, but that’s really speculative at this point.The colors are another thing I take issue with. Remember when I said the build.prop could be easily edited within an Android ROM? Well, the colors you are seeing for the battery meter and the wifi in these screenshots is identical with the “cyanbread” theme that come by default with the popular ROM Cyanogenmod 7. Honeycomb colors are a much deeper blue, and where’s all the electrified green we’ve grown used to? It’s not uncommon for Google to shake up the color pallete, but it seems extremely coincidental that Google would use a color that is so common on CyanogenMod.The multitasking app switch button looks legit to me. I can see that being very useful if the images on that icon truly represent active apps. The problem? It’s not exactly visible when other apps are running if it’s in the dock, now is it? Seems like if Google was trying to mimic the Honeycomb experience, they would make that feature avaialble anywhere in the OS, like they did with Honeycomb. Now, the counter to this is that we already have a mechanism for doing this in the home key long press, but if that’s the case then there’s no way a buttonless Android phone would work, so one of these is untrue here. Either the Ice Cream Sandwich phones are going to have buttons, or this ROM is just a fraud.What should it look like, if not this?I stumbled across this screenshot not too long ago, and I think this admittedly fake image is already far more convincing then what we’ve seen in this leak. for starters, the colors are right. However, based on the rumors we’ve heard up to this point,  we know that the Nexus “Prime” is going to be the first Ice Cream Sandwich phone, and the Nexus S will get it later. Personally, I prefer this design as it mimics the highly functional parts of Honeycomb.So, real or faux? You decide.last_img read more

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All items from The Legend of Zelda get 3D printed

first_img3D printing holds a lot of promise for creating, rather than buying what you need. One day you may be able to print your own car, your own footwear, and yes, a gun, but 3D printing can also be used to bring to life items from your favorite video games.Over at the Hyrule Foundry blog, time has been spent 3D modeling every item that’s available to collect in the original The Legend of Zelda game. Once completed, the whole set was sent off to Shapeways where they were 3D printed, and they turned out extremely well as you can see.The aim was to 3D model and print every single item in color from the original game, but there’s a few issues to iron out before that’s going to be truly possible. First of all, the arrows from the game are actually too small to have printed in color, so a different and more expensive non-color material is having to be used. The potions are also proving a problem due to the need for a transparent glass effect on the bottle. A new method of casting the bottle and placing the potion model inside is required before those items can be classed as finished.Despite those problems, Hyrule Foundry has still managed to faithfully recreate 32 of the items from the game, and if you’re a fan, you can purchase all of them. In the Hyrule Foundry Shapeways store you can buy a complete set, quarter sets, and then singles, duos, or trios of items. The arrows and potions are also available, but in the case of the potions you can’t get the bottle part yet.It’s likely Nintendo will take issue with this if it gets popular, but then you could argue why didn’t they do it first? It seems the company is embracing physical items to go alongside its games more lately, as can be seen from the forthcoming Pokemon Rumble U game, but 3d printing could open up a whole new market for them if they choose to take notice.last_img read more

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The 9 at 9 Friday

first_imgThe 9 at 9: Friday Relief after Garda strike called off, and woman found ‘chained up like dog’ – it’s your 9 at 9. By Cianan Brennan Share2 Tweet Email No Comments http://jrnl.ie/3062515 Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Nov 4th 2016, 9:00 AM Friday 4 Nov 2016, 9:00 AM Source: Shutterstock/Yulia DavidovichEVERY MORNING, TheJournal.ie brings you the stories you need to know as you wake up.1.#STRIKE THAT: There is widespread relief this morning after today’s mooted garda strike was called off at the last minute.2.#SINCERE FLATTERY: Melania Trump gave her first speech in nearly four months last night, and managed to get accused of plagiarism. Again.3.#SHANE O’FARRELL: Taoiseach Enda Kenny is to meet with the family of a young student who was killed in a hit-and-run.4. #CAO: Applications for college courses are open from this morning.5.#1916 EXHIBITION: The Advertising Standards Authority of Ireland (ASAI) has ruled that a 1916 exhibition was wrong for not clarifying that it would include a section on the 1980-81 hunger strikers in its advertising material.6. #SCHOOLS: Richard Bruton has said that a ‘large number’ of secondary schools will close on Monday given teachers who are also members of the ASTI will not be performing supervisory or substitution duties from that date.7.#SOUTH CAROLINA: A missing woman has been found ‘chained up like a dog’ inside a storage container according to a local sheriff.8.#COURTS: A Revenue sheriff is suing RTÉ and a plumber for defamation regarding an episode of the Gerry Ryan Show broadcast in April 2010.9.#GREAT PODCAST?: Eamon Dunphy is to launch an “intelligent, interesting, irreverent” football podcast.Comments are disabled for legal reasons Short URL 13,490 Views last_img read more

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Three ancient marble quarries discovered in Karystos

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram During the installation of wind parks in the greater area of the Karystos Municipality, Anatoli and Trikorfo in Marmari employees of ENEL and Silsio renewable energy companies discovered three ancient marble quarries.The coastal town of Karystos or Carystus has about 5,000 inhabitants and falls under the supervision of the Ephorate of Antiquities of Euboea island. Karystos lies 129 km south of Chalkis and from Athens it is accessible by ferry via Marmari from the port of Rafina.The first site in TrikorfoThe quarry of Anatoli in Kafireas (feature image) was found during works on the new main road to the Anatoli wind park managed by the ENEL Company, northwest of the village of Amygdalia. An ancient shale marble quarry was unearthed, with two principal mining fronts faced by small areas covered with soil, Tornos News reported.While the greater quarry area was being archaeologically cleaned, two half finished columns were located in a clean layer of fine mining gravel, which led to another quarry, the first one of Trikorfo, loacetd exactly above the main road of the works by the Silsio Company. The second ancient quarry of Trikorfo was found north west of the first one and is much larger in size.This is a very important discovery bound to shed light on the region’s marble extraction activity, for which it was renowned in ancient years.The second quarry on site.Karystos was renowned for its marble and the ancient quarries are found on the southern flanks of Mt Ochi, between the villages of Mekounida and Aetos. Strabo writes about the magnificent monolithic “Karystian columns”. Julius Ceasar and Augustus preferred Karystian marble for the construction of monolithic pillars in Rome. It was also used in the paving of floors and walls in temples and he Roman Agora. In Athens one can still admire the majestic Karystian monolithic pillars in Hadrian’s Library in Monastiraki and in ‘Kylindri’, at the top of the valley of Myloi.last_img read more

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Un sousmarin chinois plonge à plus de 5000 mètres de profondeur

first_imgUn sous-marin chinois plonge à plus de 5.000 mètres de profondeurPour la première fois, un sous-marin chinois et habité est descendu le 26 juillet 2011, à plus de 5.000 mètres de profondeur au nord-est de l’océan Pacifique.Le deuxième essai du Jiaolong s’est transformé en exploit : le 26 juillet, à 12h09 heure locale, il a franchi la barre des 5.000 mètres de profondeur au nord-est de l’océan Pacifique. Ce submersible qui emprunte le nom d’un dragon des mers de la mythologie chinoise, a fait ainsi entrer la Chine dans le club des cinq de la très grande profondeur auquel appartenait déjà les Etats-Unis, la Russie, le Japon et la France.  Issu du “plan 863”, un programme de haute technologie décidé par les autorités chinoises en 2002, le submersible rouge et blanc est conçu comme une fusée des mers et a déjà effectué 17 plongées entre le 31 mai et le 13 juillet 2010. Mais il n’était encore jamais allé aussi profond, alors que ses concepteurs affirment qu’il devrait pouvoir atteindre les 7.000 mètres de profondeur d’ici 2012, rapporte RFI.Record pour ce dragon d’Asie Par cette descente record, la Chine est donc le cinquième pays à franchir la barre des 3.500 mètres pour des missions habitées, a indiqué la presse chinoise. C’est en 1960, que la descente la plus profonde a lieu à 11.000 mètres au fond de la fosse Mariannes, au large des Philippines, record accompli par un navire de la marine américaine. À lire aussiUn plongeur se fait attaquer par un lion de merPar ailleurs, RFI indique qu’un accord entre l’Association chinoise de recherche et de développement pour l’exploitation de ressources minières océaniques (COMRA) et l’Autorité internationale des fonds sous-marins (ISA), devrait permettre au Jiaolong de prendre des photos, mais aussi d’effectuer des repérages topographiques dans une zone de 75.000 kilomètres carrés sous la surface des océans. Au delà de cet aspect scientifique, les ambitions affichées de Pékin suscitent une certaine inquiétude parmi ses voisins : “Je crois qu’il ne faudra pas attendre longtemps avant que la Chine puisse effectuer ses premières opérations minières dans les fonds marins “, a affirmé à l’AFP, Jian Zhimin, le directeur du laboratoire d’Etat de géologie marine de l’Université Tongji de Shanghai.Le 28 juillet 2011 à 11:14 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

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Kakuta joins Rayo Vallecano

first_imgRayo Vallecano have signed Gael Kakuta, according to Goal.Rayo Vallecano have resigned Gael Kakuta on a permanent basis after he spent the 2014-15 season on loan at the Campo de Futbol de Vallecas.The former Chelsea player joins the newly promoted Spanish La Liga side on a four-year deal from Hebei China Fortune.Kakuta returns to Rayo a club he had a fruitful loan spell with scoring five times in 35 appearances for the Spanish side.Zidane uncertain of Bale’s future after latest twist Obinna Echi – April 29, 2019 Real Madrid manager Zinedine Zidane disclosed he is uncertain of Gareth Bale’s future at the club beyond this summer.Real Madrid suffered another shameful defeat 1-0 to bottom-placed Rayo…The Gabon international spent the whole of last season on loan with French Ligue 1 side Amiens who finished 13th on the log.Rayo have brought the forward back as they look to strengthen their squad for the upcoming La Liga season.“Gael has arrived at Rayo Vallecano from Chinese side Hebei CFFC, signing for four years,” the club said in an official statement.Kakuta has joined his teammates for preseason training as they look to avoid the drop next season.last_img read more

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Pep Guardiola warns Liverpool about pressure

first_imgManchester City manager Pep Guardiola believes Liverpool are showing the same hunger his team showed last season, but insists the pressure of being favorites is tough to handle.Jurgen Klopp’s men can increase their lead over City to 10 points should they win Thursday’s clash between the two clubs at the Etihad Stadium.Liverpool are still unbeaten in the Premier League and looking strong as the Citizens were when they won the league last season.Guardiola said, according to BT Sport:“My feeling is last season it was a little bit easier to maintain that hunger because 80 per cent of the players had not won anything in our lives.”“I can feel what they feel, the Liverpool players. After 29 years not winning the Premier League, to be there to win the Premier League, I understand.Jadon Sancho, Borussia DortmundCrouch: Liverpool could beat Man United to Jadon Sancho Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Peter Crouch wouldn’t be surprised to see Jadon Sancho end up at Liverpool one day instead of his long-term pursuers Manchester United.“I said to the players, that’s difficult to handle.”City, who are currently seated in third position, are now facing a different kind of pressure in trying to usurp Liverpool at the top of the Premier League standings.Guardiola admits he is uncertain if his players are capable of mounting such a challenge.He said: “If it is different pressure, we have to live it, we have to handle it.”“What do I think? Yes, we are ready. I (personally) don’t have doubts, but honestly I don’t know (for certain).”last_img read more

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Miami beauty supply store robbed

first_imgMIAMI (WSVN) – A beauty supply store in Miami was robbed, Monday afternoon.According to the City of Miami police, an armed robbery occurred just after 1 p.m. at Lubin’s Discount Beauty Supply located at Northeast Second Avenue and 78th Street.No injuries were reported.Detectives continue to investigate the robbery. If you have any information that can help investigators, call Miami-Dade Crime Stoppers at 305-471-TIPS. Remember, you can always remain anonymous, and you may be eligible for a $1,000 reward.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

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Education skills determine quality of life in older age

first_imgScientists have found that raising your level of education and skills during your working life are key factors in determining your quality of life in retirement and older age. The study, published in the Journal of Vocational Behaviour, involved interviewing around 50 retirees from a range of different professions and educational backgrounds.It was found that pathways to retirement and experiences of retirement differed greatly according to profession, gender, class and education.The researchers from the University of Birmingham in the UK identified six groups of workers including the professionals, delayed professionals, those who had disjointed careers, mid-career transformation, administrative careers and semi-skilled careers.Experiences of retirement differed greatly according to which group workers fell into. For example, it was found the professionals were more likely to continue working in a part-time capacity (though not for financial gain), while those who had disjointed careers were more likely to continue to work in some capacity, such as in self- employment with retirement not an option to them.Meanwhile, those who had administrative careers retired from paid employment but were more likely to stay busy with activities such as helping family and doing volunteering.The study showed the importance of external factors throughout working life, such as employment, family caring history, social networks and cultural capital (including education) and physical and mental health in younger and middle ages.The research also identified a link between gender and class. For example, men and women with similar career histories shared similar retirement expectations and experiences.”All of these factors are interlinked, so financial resources can give individuals greater access to social and cultural resources and help maintain physical health,” said Joanne Duberley, from the University of Birmingham.”While education shapes careers and helps people to amass financial capital. As such these interlinkages can mean that inequalities in the initial distribution of resources are reinforced, facilitating those in a privileged position and constrain those who are disadvantaged,” Duberley said.The researchers identified a range of differing perspectives and feelings about retirement within each group. For example, those who had long professional careers were more likely to be optimistic and contented in retirement.The study found those who followed disjointed career paths with periods in and out of work and in different types of employment.last_img read more

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Dbacks president Derrick Hall Franchise still f

first_img D-backs president Derrick Hall: Franchise ‘still focused on Arizona’ Somers reports assistant coaches took a 35 percent pay cut during the lockout, meaning they will get that money back. What an MLB source said about the D-backs’ trade haul for Greinke Cardinals expect improving Murphy to contribute right away 0 Comments   Share   center_img Nevada officials reach out to D-backs on potential relocation Top Stories The Arizona Cardinals were panned by many for having employees take a furlough or pay cut during the lockout.Well, according to the Arizona Republic’s Kent Somers, the Cardinals deserve an apology — or at least a pat on the back.The Cardinals will reimburse employees who took furloughs and paycuts as a result of the lockout.Team president Michael Bidwill announced the move Tuesday in a regular monthly meeting with employees.last_img read more

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Lakatamia in dire financial straits says mayor

first_imgLakatamia mayor Fotoulla Hadjipapa bemoaned the municipality’s miserable financial state on Wednesday, saying that they owed close to €17 million.Speaking at a news conference where she disclosed the Nicosia district’s local authority’s finances, Hadjipapa said the sorry state of affairs was the result of mismanagement and reckless spending in recent years.The mayor said they owed some €16.9m, making Lakatamia a monument to mismanagement and wastage.“Unfortunately, the tragic position in which the municipality is in today … leaves no other choice but to address the residents with honesty and clarity,” she said.Hadjipapa had pledged before her election that economic consolidation and prudent financial administration was her top priority.Her words could probably apply to quite a few of the island’s 30 municipalities, which face serious financial problems.Yet bills to reform the sector, including cutting the number of local authorities to more sustainable levels, have been languishing in parliament and were not expected to be approved with parties closing ranks ahead of the presidential elections next February.“We will apply to all relevant state departments in a bid to tackle the situation,” she said. “If necessary, we will seek the assistance of outside consultants and experts. We will ask for an in-depth investigation, to analyse the data, carry out a proper audit, so that we know how this tragic condition was created.”Municipal accountant Panayiotis Makkoulis said their deficit reached around €252,000 last year, compared with €366,000 in 2015.Last year the municipality had around €9.3m in revenue against €9.5m expenses.As with other local authorities, used by political parties throughout the years as vehicles for featherbedding, Lakatamia’s payroll was one of the main expenses in 2016, reaching €4.2m, up from around €4.1m the previous year.“It makes up 45 per cent of the revenues,” Makkoulis said. “Accumulated deficits reached €2.5m in December 31, 2016.”You May LikeFigLeaf Beta AppGet Maximum Privacy with Minimum EffortFigLeaf Beta AppUndoTotal Battle – Online Strategy GameIf You’re PC User This Strategy Game Is A Must-Have!Total Battle – Online Strategy GameUndoClassmates.comLook For Any High School Yearbook, It’s FreeClassmates.comUndo Concern over falling tourism numbersUndoTurkish Cypriot actions in Varosha ‘a clear violation’ of UN resolutions, Nicosia saysUndoTwo arrested in connection with attempted murderUndoby Taboolaby Taboolalast_img read more

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